73

Eventually some part of your brain is going to start thinking, "Holy (expletive), Rattlesnake! I'm gonna loose an extremity! I'm gonna die! What's going to happen to my family? Why did I even come on this (expletive) trip? OhGodOhGodOhGodOh...." Then another part of your brain is going to tell the first part to stop thinking like that, it is not ...


29

When a rattlesnake gets his rattle on, what exactly is the desired reaction it's expecting from you, and what other indicators does it give you that a strike is imminent? It's a warning that it's there, it's not necessarily a warning that it's about to strike (though of course, it could.) Likewise they won't always rattle before they strike. However, bear ...


21

Practice. I watched my dad nearly slice his thumb off while cutting wood, in the middle of nowhere in France, with a meat cleaver when I was about 10. He turned to me and said 'Go to your mum, ask her for the electrical tape. Tell her it's urgent and to hurry.' I remember it clearly to this day, he didn't panic, he didn't jump up and wave his now hanging ...


20

I'd suggest being very careful with information about venomous snakes on the internet. The reason is the USA's traditional preponderance on that medium (particularly the English-speaking portion of it). The USA is somewhat unusual in that almost all venomous snakes one is likely to encounter are Pit Vipers. These snakes have a special muscle for pumping ...


18

Ahh, I have been waiting for this. This answer would definitely be not much of a help if you hate complicated biology and physiology and related terms. But anyone who is equally interested in snakes is welcome to have a read through. While I am really sorry that I can't simply answer it as these many months or these many years, what I can explain here is a ...


16

When bitten by a rattlesnake: keep the patient still. keep the body part/limb bitten below the area of the heart. do not constrict blood flow. Remove jewelry, other articles of clothing or any accessories that might restrict blood flow. get to a hospital as fast as possible, if at all possible. do NOT cut the bite and attempt to suck the venom do NOT apply ...


15

First of all, you are more likely to hear the rattlesnake than see it. They tend to camouflage themselves quite well, and unless you are paying very close attention, they are easy to miss. I have actually stepped less than a foot from one and not noticed it until I was passing it (It was coiled in a circle, hence my lack of rattle snake bites...) If you ...


14

The concern is valid; your basic plan should be to stay calm and not increase your heart rate. If other options for evacuation are not available, slowly walking yourself out is the best remaining option. The bitten area can swell quite a bit, so remove nearby jewelry or clothing to prevent them from turning into tourniquets. If you have a pen you can use ...


13

Mate, I am so glad to know that you and your daughter are safe. First, Rattlers are often found under rocks and logs, particularly if the temperature doesn't suit them. So instruct your kids and other concerned people about it. Rattlesnakes are typically capable of striking up to a distance equal to 1/3rd to half of their overall length, although longer ...


12

Know what to do Make an effort to know how to deal with the risks of <activity> The most important thing I learn when I attend first aid courses is not the treatment of the injury, but knowing what to do encourages calmness. Staying calm helps you make better decisions about how to deal with the situation and usually keeps the casualty calm. In the ...


11

Stop and move away. Generally that's all you need to do. The rattle is a defensive warning. Develop the instinct (and teach your kids to do so as well) that you freeze, locate it, and move in the opposite direction the instant you hear a rattle, and you should be fine.


11

When a snake rattles at you, it wants you to move away from it. Rattlers will warn you first before striking, giving you enough time to move away. My wife and I were hiking once in the desert, she was ahead of me and passed right by a large diamondback snake that was curled up next to the trail. He coiled up and rattled at her, scaring her so that she ...


9

Rattlesnakes will generally only strike when provoked. That is the very reason we hear them rattle. Keep in mind a rattler cannot produce more venom quickly, so they too prefer to flee rather than bite. Young snake tend to be more aggressive and do not know how to control their venom. If you hear one close to you, back away slowly. Once far enough away they ...


9

First, to directly answer your question: no, don't run. Running increases your heart rate, which increases how fast the venom will be spread through your body. It also increases the likelihood of another injury such as a twisted ankle, which would further delay treatment. Your first priority is to distance yourself from the snake and any of its friends. ...


8

It's always best to back off and walk around it. Rattlesnakes can strike very fast and far. I find that the bigger problem with snakes in common is that you step close to one unexpectedly. Most of the time they strike out of reflex when you almost stand on them, like for instance in bushes or below large stones where you step over.


6

Medical care is needed immediately. Get it quickly. The Sawyer Kit is actually reported to reduce the severity of bites, but does not replace the need for care. It may buy you some extra time though. Running or other activities that drive your heart rate up aren't generally good. It's kind of hard to keep the heart rate down because your first instinct ...


6

Meditation has been mentioned, let me expand on it. There are certain techniques of meditation (namely Vipassana) which are in no way mystic or magical, but work quite like a sort of maintenance for the mind. While they are obviously employed a lot in Buddhism, they have at their core no religious/mystical background whatsoever, and they do "work" no matter ...


5

Here is a quote from Wikipedia: The idea that bullsnakes occasionally eat rattlesnakes is sometimes given as a reason for humans not to harm bullsnakes when encountering them in the wild, although a better reason is the bullsnake's role in controlling warm-blooded vermin such as rodents. While this may occasionally happen, the truth is bull snakes don't ...


4

There are two things you can focus on depending on your immediate needs. Focus on small things to do All I have to do is make a 911 call All I have to do is restrict blood flow All I have to do is stop the bleeding All I have to do is turn on my flashlight etc. The key is to focus on the tiny tasks. Leave the bigger ones for later. If you have little ...


4

Like others have said in their answers, give yourself something to do, and mentally rehearse it before you go into an area with danger of snakes. As for what to do specifically, here's what we learned in my wilderness first aid course: Call for help - 911, if there's other people in the area have one of them call 911, whatever's going to get paramedics to ...


4

I don't know if this helps, but when I have time to daydream I often intentionally run through awful situations in my mind, embracing as much anxiety as possible (it's a curse) and imagining a good response. I find that this helps me when things actually happen. I've had tangible results with this: One scenario I used to run through often is what I would ...


4

This looks like a Prairie Rattler. I'm guessing you're in New Mexico or Arizona? These are usually very docile animals; they don't want trouble. I have had a couple that were tame enough that I could handle them without holding their heads. Don't bother them, and they will definitely not bother you. Very passive creatures. But like any animal, don't ...


3

For what I have known, Crotalus horridus, The Timber Rattlesnake does not swim well. Its not a water snake, though its appearance may resemble other water snakes found in its habitat. An inexperienced person may easily confuse between them. The only reason I think the authorities have preferred that particular area as a potential habitat for a sanctuary of ...


3

According to this article: How to identify and treat snake bites - yes this does seem to be something which some people state as accurate. Venomous snakes have two fangs that deliver venom when they bite. A venomous snake bite will usually leave two clear puncture marks. In contrast, a nonvenomous bite tends to leave two rows of teeth marks. However, ...


3

There are lots of answers here and I'm reluctant to add one more, but after reading through them they all seem to focus on breathing and meditation. I'd like to add some other things to this with a more medical focus, as well as directly address your main questions: I'd like to know exactly what is meant by "keeping calm" It quite simply means that ...


3

Along the lines of existing answers to breathe or meditate, I prefer "The Litany Against Fear". Breathing alone does not divert the mind for long, so it's necessary to add something else. When meditating, one is usually attempting to reign in the mind, but doing so takes mental energy and focus and, in my experience, works best when starting calm. (When I ...


3

Returning to a calm state is aided by knowing what to do for a given event. Knowing the actions required to deal with any situation allows the brain to focus on acting on those steps vice panicking. How quickly this occurs depends on the amount of time spent learning, practicing, and actually dealing with the event. Given enough experience your reactions ...


2

Ignorance often breeds (uncontrollable and unnecessary) fear. It doesn't take much to learn about the significant dangers (and how to deal with them) in an area you will visit. Facts such as (in Southern California low desserts) no rattle snake bitten victim has ever died. (One exception concerned an "imported" rattlesnake) (In a similar vein, on average, ...


2

This isn't a scientific evidence based answer, but I think that line should not be changing much, as it should have more to do with snow cover than temperature. This article on the history of snow fall in the Sierras, asserts that there has been no change in snowfall over 130 years despite a change in temperatures. This isn't too surprising as air carries ...


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