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11

According to this article, (How to Tell a Raven From a Crow): Ravens often travel in pairs, while crows are seen in larger groups. Also, watch the bird’s tail as it flies overhead. The crow’s tail feathers are basically the same length, so when the bird spreads its tail, it opens like a fan. Ravens, however, have longer middle feathers in their tails, so ...


5

The biggest difference between ravens and crows is that ravens average 2 feet long with a 4 ft wingspan, while crows are about 1.5 ft long with a wingspan of 3 feet. These numbers can vary a bit regionally and by individual, but for a casual birder, the size difference along is enough to differentiate them. The ravens also have a distinctly deeper call, ...


2

I am a little late in answering, but thought I would answer in the event you were still feeding your local Corvids. As Olin said, they are intelligent and amazingly so. That is important when trying to woo them to a feeding area because they will stay away if something has made them feel at risk (pets, wind chimes, clanging objects like ladders or loose ...


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Birds of the genus Corvus are intelligent and generalists. They are not picky, and can survive on lots of different types of food. They are also more able than other birds to find clever ways to get to food. Anything edible that isn't small seed they can't pick up easily will interest them. I've had ravens catch little bits of cheese I threw up in the ...


2

Ravens spend a lot of time aloft, and fly steadily and sometimes quite high (also solo or in loose pairs most of the time). They call infrequently "cronk" or "cronk cronk" while airborne. They seem to need a good reason to take off but also to land. When they're perched (which they like to do from a good vantage point), a good look can show shaggy feathers ...


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