10

I know that bow length needs to match the draw length mostly because you lose precision if overdrawing it as soon as the string stop touching the limbs and just hold on the tips, string can swing sideways and affect arrow travel. Holy... - no! Just no! No, no, no, no, no :) There are even 44" (38" string) which are able to shoot accurate 'till 32" ...


10

In simple terms. Yes. But it is easily avoided. When not in use dry off the bow and keep it in a waterproof case. Like anything, prolonged moisture is damaging. Using it in the rain is no problem, I'm talking about days or weeks without being dryed. Same goes with the string. They are usually coated in beeswax but moisture will eventually take effect. It'...


6

A recurve could be considered more accurate than a longbow due to the simple fact that longbows traditionally do not have sights, whereas a recurve does. It is however down to skill. As a side note I will mention arrows as well. For a recurve I had carbon fiber arrows with a spiraled aluminum core, curved fletchings, and interchangeable weighed heads. For ...


5

Adding a quiver to the bow will increase the amount of noise, and also increase the amount of interference of the flight of the arrow as it leaves the bow. It also makes your bow heavier increasing the amount of effort to aim and hold the aim.


4

The Shelf The answer is really simple. It's the little "cut out" just above the grip. This edge where you can "lay down" your arrow while you shoot. A picture might help: Note: An "arrow rest" is something different! Design patterns Some notes on the different designs which may occur: There are 3 basic types of shelf designs; flat, radiused and ...


4

A bow whose string touches a section of the limb ... Yeah, all these different bows may confuse a beginner. However, it's generally really easy like in this case. A recurve is simply defined as "a bow of which the string touches a section of the limb when it is strung". To further explain this definition refer to this image: The string: as you might have ...


4

In addition to the already given answers, I've found a in-depth guide on how to build a bow (full credit goes to Jason Knight). How to Make a Quickie Bow from a Sapling 1. Choosing wood The first step is to select the proper materials. Some of the best woods for making bows include osage orange, yew, ash, black locust, and hickory, though most ...


4

Two different kinds of wood, fiber from bark (to make the string and to hold the wood together while gluing), a knife or hatchet, pitch from a pine tree, fire to temper the wood. The stiff wood needs to be on the front of the bow, the less stiff on the back. Edit: if making a recurve, you need to soak the wood, and bend it opposite the direction you will ...


3

The earlier answers were "Technically" correct, but how many bows are in use today with a quiver attached? Again, strictly scientifically speaking, yes it adds weight to one side, however in real world use it will not likely affect your bow in any negative way. Millions of people shoot bows with quivers attached every day. I think you can adjust to it ...


2

From the sales material you quote it sounds like the 'wood' in question has been vacuum stabilised. This involves completely saturating the wood with a polymer resin so it is in effect more like a plastic composite than natural wood but retains the grain and appearance of wood. As long as the process has bee carried out correctly this should make the ...


1

yes, it is possible, at least for the Alabama curriculum it is. Alabama doesn't require the course, but other states do and you can take it online. The course specifically talks about recurves and longbows. Check you state laws concerning minimum poundage and equipment, and assuming the state your hunting in allows the weapon, give it a go. You can see ...


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