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14

Given that your avalanche beacon has the potential to be your partner's lifeline (or your own), it makes sense to protect it. Rocks, branches, skis, poles, ice tools, there's a lot that could potentially damage this important piece of equipment before you even enter avalanche terrain. In the event of an avalanche, it's not just the pressure of snow on ...


8

The problem with rescuing someone in the death zone is, well, that it is the death zone. Supplemental oxygen helps, but the decreased pressure is also problematic. If you are injured or sick, you are not going to get better no matter what type of supplies could be hauled up to you. The only way to rescue someone is to get them down, and get them down quickly....


5

Beacons are tough. Tougher than you if you get thrown against a rock or a tree or buried under the snow. With that in mind, if things were so bad that there was any concern about my beacon being damaged in an avalanche I would certainly be more worried about whether I could survive the impact. Clothing is not going to provide much shielding against the sort ...


5

This sort of hard decision happens at lower elevations. In some ways harder: The Death Zone scenarios obliges you to abandon the victim to save the rest of the party. At lower elevations it's often less clearcut. The difference usually amounts to better weather shorter distances to more moderate terrain. easier access to machine assistance (skidoo, ...


4

Assuming weather conditions were perfect, and the condition you were treating was mostly oedema, then a hot air balloon with a hyperbaric chamber may be possible. However, conditions are rarely perfect, and the risk, and expense would simply be too much to keep such a toy on constant standby near the major climbs. The manoeuvrability of such a vehicle ...


3

If you can get to the person, a rescue operation is 90% done. A danger zone is a danger zone because spotting someone is often impossible, let alone getting near them. I never heard of anyone passing near someone that was dying and ignoring it, even in the massive scam Everest is. Edit: I didn't know about the case of David Sharp, mentioned in the comments....


2

The biggest reason I've always believed that you wear your beacon next to your base layer is battery life. Cold is well known to reduce battery life. By keeping the beacon close to your body you r beacon will function longer and may even have a stronger signal because the batteries aren't fighting the cold. I don't know how much of a difference this makes ...


2

Mt Elias isn't even in the top ten for number of deaths. It comes in in 24th place according to https://www.shughal.com/25-of-the-deadliest-mountains-in-the-world/ with Everest at number 1. This site takes into account the ratio of deaths to number of attempts, as well as total deaths. For the top ten we have: 10 - The Eiger 09 - Annapurna 08 - Cerro Torre ...


1

The American Alpine Club does provide some rescue insurance as part of its membership. It's the only group that I know of that does. As I recall it's fairly limited. In the United States, rescue is still mostly free. Any costs are generally covered by the local government and if you are rescued your county will likely be billed for your rescue costs. So ...


1

Not all search and rescue organizations charge for their services, even for air evacuation. It varies from state to state and even county by county. In the US clubs like the Sierra Club, the Mazamas, do not offer insurance, and in fact require that you sign waivers holding them not responsible if you are injured on an outing they sponsor. The American ...


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