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24

The term 'rifle' comes from the fact that the barrel of a rifle has spiral grooves (called rifling) cut into the inside. When the bullet is fired it is forced into these grooves which in turn cause it to spin as it travels down the barrel. This spin around its long axis creates a gyroscopic effect which stabilises it in flight dramatically improving its ...


15

In the U.S. there are legal definitions provided by code (18 USC 921) and regulation (27 CFR 478.11), which are somewhat derived from the customary definitions. A shotgun is designed to shoot shot (i.e., multiple ball projectiles) through a smooth bore. Yes, you can buy rifled shotguns designed to fire a single projectile, but they still shoot shotgun ...


14

US Fisheries and Wildlife (with black and grizzly bears) suggests that bear spray is statistically more effective. A 2008 study by Smith et al included two polar bear encounters where the bears were successfully deterred with bear spray. However, in polar bear country you have other considerations, as the Nunavut visitor information says Pepper spray ...


9

.30-06 is a much more powerful round with flatter trajectory and greater impact energy. That said, for shots on mid-sized game (like deer) at ranges out to 300 yards, it makes no difference which of those two rounds you use, only that your shot is accurate. Both rounds are plenty powerful enough for those common hunting scenarios. For long range shots or ...


7

It looks like because you are in the UK, there is a power restriction, which means that you can either go high velocity, lightweight pellet or a low velocity heavy pellet. If that restriction wasn't there, more power would make for cleaner kills. Regardless of calibre, all standard air rifles are restricted in power output to a maximum of 12 ft/lb. ...


7

In the absence of lead, it is possible to use gravel or pieces of metal, as was done by various tribes in the American West, but it will damage the flintlock. As recorded by Capt. Meriwether Lewis (of Lewis and Clark fame), The implyments used by the Chinnooks Clatsops Cuth-lah-mahs &c in hunting are the gun the bow & arrow, deadfalls, 3 pitts, ...


6

One could use many natural things as a projectile, but I will limit my answer to two items and the lethal possibilities would depend on how close you are to the victim. This is such an expansive question, I hope others will have better ideas. My first possible source would be rock salt or halite. Depends on the distance. The bullet would, without a ...


6

Adjustable power scopes are inherently less sturdy than fixed power scopes because they have more moving parts. A .308 has a fair amount of recoil and after repeatedly firing it could shake loose parts in a scope not designed for that purpose. It all depends on the scope, but an airgun scope would likely fail after a while if mounted on a .308.


6

I have used a .177 caliber air rifle with a 1200 fps muzzle velocity to kill rabbits. It is a very quick and clean kill if you hit them in the kill zone. Their hide is incredibly weak compared to larger animals, so you can even get away with longer shots. I have personally killed them up to 30 meters, but I don't think that was the limit of that gun. I have ...


5

The long and the short of it is no - definitely not. If you check wikipedia (or other reputable sources such as SAAMI) you will see that the parent case of the .38-40 is the .44-40 Wincheseter, which on the face of it makes them completely incompatible. To see why these rounds are actually incompatible you can search the SAAMI specifications for the .38 and ...


5

No, I don't believe so. The .38-40, perhaps despite its name is a 40 caliber round, while the .38 Special, certainly despite its name, is a much smaller .357 round. The case diameter dimensions are also much smaller, so a .38 Special round is unlikely to fit properly in your rifle. In addition, it's generally considered to be a bad idea to fire modern ...


5

Two options are available to you depending on what style rifle, scope, and rings you are using: Loosen the scope rings and slide the scope along the scope tube rearward (towards the stock) Move the entire scope and mounting rings rearward. This would be the preferable option if your rifle has a picatinny style mounting rail. Some other items to remember: ...


5

Assuming both the 40 and 60 grain are actually subsonic (the projectile does not break the sound barrier) and both have similar muzzle velocities, you should expect the 60 grain to be louder. It takes more energy (gun powder) to get the heavier 60 grain projectile to the same speed as the lighter 40 grain projectile.


4

So the question remains.......what is the difference. Well in my experience there is very little difference when we are talking about bullet weights up to 180gr. A friend of mine has a 30-06 and I use a .308 Win. We put our money together to purchase heads (Nosler custom competition 155gr HPBT) to reload ourselves and we noticed something very ...


4

A fluted barrel has two advantages, The flutes make the barrel lighter and thus easier to carry for long periods while hunting. More surface area means that the barrel cools down faster. As barrels heat up they lose their accuracy to a degree. Normally while hunting this isn't a big deal, but when sighting in or practicing this needs to be taken into ...


4

The distinction between rifle and shotgun can get convoluted if only considering shot vs single projectile. Shotguns can be loaded with rifled slugs, rifles can fire shot shells. CCI has marketed shot shells for the 22LR, 22Mag, 9mm Luger, 40S&W, 44 Mag, and probably others (those are just the ones I've bought). Yes, I've seen and/or owned rifles in ...


3

Mine is. If you told someone what kind of gun you were using you would get a better answer. I use an RWS 350 that shoots .22 caliber 18.13 grain pellets 750 fps. I've killed rabbits from over 50 yards. When I was a kid back in the 1960's there were a few pump up air rifles that could do the same. Crosman 140 came out in 1954 and it shot .22 caliber 14 ...


3

When I was young, we would hunt both rabbits and grouse with a .177 caliber air rifle and found them fine for hunting. We made it a point of using pointed pellets while hunting: A selection of .22 pointed pellets: RWS Superpoint, Beeman Silver Sting, Beeman Silver Arrow and ARS Cobra. Pointed The head of a pointed pellet is just that. It ends in ...


3

It is important to match your intended shooting height to the bipod that you select. Additionally, the longer that you are shooting the more stable the attachment between the rifle and the bipod need to be. Additionally to properly load up the bipod you want feet that will grip the surface that you are on instead of allowing the bipod to walk forward.


3

I have owned, reloaded, and hunted with both 30 caliber rounds and have to say that they are both very effective and capable for almost all hunting applications. The first comparison I can offer is felt recoil, the 30-06 is a little bit more than 308 in this area. So For new shooters still getting use to shooting with a scoped rifle 308 will probably be ...


3

There are 3 different manufacturers currently making these. Auto Ordance Inland Manufacturing Fulton Armory There is also a stock for 10-22 rifles that make it look like an m1 carbine but still fires 22 ammo. Of course, you can also still buy the originals.


3

The issue isn't really variable vs. fixed power - it's whether the scope in question ("Weaver 3-9x40" is probably at least a dozen different scopes) is suitable for a high-power rifle or not. Most rimfire (and probably air-rifle) scopes are going to have a 30mm or smaller objective; I'd venture to guess that with a 40mm objective, it will be fine on a ....


3

Instead of carrying bear spray, noise flares, and/or a rifle, how about carrying bear spray (primary) and a large caliber pistol (backup at close range)?


3

A difference on the side of the rifle would be that polar bears live in more open environments, so they're easier to see coming. A difference on the pepper spray side could be that these open plains can be windy, limiting the range and precision of the spray. So I figure the different approach might have more to do with environmental factors than bear ...


3

For long range shooting, you have to aim above the target in order to hit it. For example, a 308 will have dropped 340 inches at 1,000 yards. Source Instead of aiming above, it is possible to dial a scope in so that you can hold the crosshairs directly on the target. However, scopes have a limited amount of movement. A 20 MOA (or 30 or 40) rail will point ...


3

A bore sight will get you close, but it's not perfect and you will want to shoot real bullets to test your aim afterwards. If you bore sight it at 25 yards it should be on paper at 100 yards and you can make small adjustments from there. As for calculating how much it will drop over distance/ be pushed by the wind there are ballistic calculators or phone ...


3

Most of these I have experience with the supporting arms are the weak point - hit them and they bend, making it hard to take the target apart for storage, keeping the target from spinning/flipping, etc. A spring loaded "popper" style target may work better/longer without issues. Alternatively, a hanging target and have it hung from (small) chains. I've ...


3

22 Long Rifle bolt actions usually hold the bullet to the bolt with a spring. See the red arrow below. That spring is pushing against the cartridge to hold it in place. If you pull on the spring out away from the action it should come loose. Be careful not to bend the spring too much because then it won't be able to pull the cartridge case out of the ...


2

We carry both, a handgun (.45) and bear spray in black bear/grizzly country. A warning shot recently stopped a black bear from (bluff) charging LONG before it was within range of the bear spray. I deployed the bear spray as well, but it was carried sideways 10 feet by the wind and the bear would have to been much closer for it to be effective. Had it charged ...


2

tl;dr: No. Any theoretical advantage of one rifling profile over another is lost in execution. Since this is a question of practice, not theory, I appeal here to the experience of authorities in this space. Bartlein Barrels, which for years has been on the forefront of barrel research and manufacturing, and whose barrels are the most widely used in ...


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