43

The canoe has three huge advantages: it works in the absence of paths or trails it can carry enormous loads adding paddlers to it makes it go faster The first is probably the most important. I've paddled a distance while someone else walks (for various reasons) and if the person is walking across lawn, it's about the same, and if I'm into the wind I'm ...


29

All waters no, some places like National Parks require permits, see Dinosaur Monument and Canyonlands. It also differs state by state, in some states the water belongs to the public but not the stream bed, so floating is fine but using an anchor is trespassing. In other states the public has a right to the water and the sides to the high water mark, so one ...


23

Don't violate Zebra Mussel restrictions!!! There are lots of lakes in Minnesota, and many of them are connected by streams. Its is great to paddle between them in a canoe, you can go tens of miles through dozens of lakes if you have the time and back strength. That being said, some lake have zebra mussels, and some don't. Minnesota DNR has restrictions ...


15

No. Water use, like everything else in the US, is a patchwork of Federal, State, and Local regulations plus quasi-legal muscle. Multiple overlapping laws and agencies can apply at each level. Here's some examples in my home state of Oregon. Oswego Lake In Oregon ORS 537.110 flatly states "All water within the state from all sources of water supply belongs ...


15

Lash them together in parallel with spars such that there's a wide enough gap down the middle that you can paddle in the centre. As you say, you're not going to be making tight turns, but you are in full control of both boats which is the more significant aspect. You also gain massively on stability, especially if you have other (non-able bodied) persons. ...


14

This answer is focused to a bike and canoe combination. This answer began as a an internet search, but I have completed all of the legs by bike and/or canoe. No Warranty on the information is implied here, it represents my findings at the time each piece was written. The bike trail is generally rails to trails, the trail generally well above the river (...


14

It's always risky to be on a river that you have no information about. Apart from waterfalls there could be other dangers such as rapids, rocks under the surface, whirlpools/undercurrents, artificial dams, ... This isn't like in the movies, where the protagonists float down a calm river on a flimsy boat until they see from afar the misty cloud of a waterfall....


10

The most efficient boat design is fairly straightforward. Rowing is more efficient than paddling, because anchoring the oar to the hull allows oars to be longer than paddles and longer levers are more efficient. Facing backwards allows you to use the muscles in your legs, which is also more efficient. None of the gains are likely to convince white water ...


9

No. Not reliably. But you only need to be wrong once. Depending on how abrupt the drop is, you may only see a horizon line, with no white caps from rapids below. If there is enough wind to put riffles on the water, you may not notice it. An abrupt drop will have all the noise hidden below the horizon, so sound will be substantially attenuated. Factors ...


7

For calm water towing would work. For short stretches of even the gentlest rapids the best approach would be to tie up one boat, paddle the first down (or pole up), tie it up and walk back for the other. Continuous white water on a solo expedition (presumably far from civilisation as well, or you wouldn't need to carry so much) seems like a bad idea, even ...


7

As mentioned in the answer provided by Charlie Brumbaugh, many states use the Ordinary High Water Mark (OHWM) to define the limits of state control. The images below from the American Water Works Association publication entitled Understanding the Proposed Definition of the Waters of the United States help illustrate what this means:


7

The typical speed of a canoe on calm water is at least the same as a person walking along a smooth path, about 3 mph. If you are walking along a road, then a bicycle or a car would be the most efficient means. A more meaningful comparison would be between a canoe on a river and hiking through the bush. For the Voyageurs, the canoe was by far the best choice. ...


6

Of course you should research your rivers beforehand, and have a decent idea of where the major hazards are, but even assuming you've done so and are expecting them, it's still necessary to detect the hazards as you approach, and this is something covered in the kayak leader training I've done (I know also canoe leader training is similar, and would expect ...


6

I canoe a bit, almost exclusively down stream I tend to paddle at a steady speed, with almost no drifting. I average about 2 miles per hour (3KPH). As the river is 290 kilometres (180 mi) long that gives a down stream time of about 90 river hours. If you did 10 hours a day on the river, you could do the whole thing in 9 days. BUT going up river, and with ...


5

Towing doesn't work well. The trailing canoe will tend to swing wildly from side to side. This is a chronic problem when towing a swamped canoe to shore. This may be affected by how the trailing boat is loaded. Try loading it stern heavy. Another effect with towing: the towed canoe will not have the same behaviour in the wind. In a cross wind it will ...


5

This answer is focused to a bike and canoe combination. Camping areas appear to be appropriate but I have not contacted or visited them. It is the result of several hours searching the internet, I have not been to any of these locations in person. No warranty is made about the accuracy of the information but all appears to be correct. The Ohio River ...


4

This Interactive Map Tool pinpoints all locks and dams, as well as paddling access and amenities, including boat launches on the Ohio River: There are at least two tenting campgrounds by the water about halfway between Pittsburg and Wheeling near East Liverpool: Smiths Landing Campground & Yellow Creek. Then another just past Wheeling: DC Ventures. ...


4

From the Marine Department: please note the question is describing a power-driven heading towards a vessel at anchor but not a vessel under way and showing a port side light. In the picture, the upper white light is the forward anchor light whilst the lower white light is the anchor light at the stern of the vessel. The red light at the middle is an all ...


3

Your question mixes two things together which are actually very different: How efficient ... in terms of effort/time required to cover distance Boats of all kinds are really efficient in terms of what you call "effort". You can move a lot of weight with them, while expending little energy. Speed actually reduces that efficiency, that's why the ...


2

This answer is a work in progress This answer is focused to a bike and canoe combination. Only legs I have traveled by bike and/or canoe are listed. No Warranty on the information is implied here, it represents my findings at the time each piece was written. The bike trail is generally rails to trails, the trail generally well above the river (flooding ...


2

You can usually notice the noise. And if the river is loud, then be triple careful. But generally, it's not important what you notice, but what you don't notice. Can you see water 100m in front of you? Great, than you know, if the next 100 meters are safe. But you have no idea if the 101 meter is still safe. Your security margin is as far as you can see. ...


2

It's going to be slow, with a lot of rowing. Looking at the prevailing winds, to get an estimate of how much the wind will be on your side, it's not good news. In June, at Greenville Airport the wind is more likely to be against you than on your side, as you head broadly north upstream. This is true for the majority of reporting stations on the prevailing ...


2

The head of navigation is entirely subjective. It depends on the type and the size of boats, which have different requirements. The river Thames in UK, for example, has several locations that limit navigation. London Bridge was the traditional limit for tall ships due to their mast height Richmond lock marks another limit, restricting the width of vessels ...


1

It is the motorboat. Definitiely Draft Any sailing vessel needs a mechanism to withstand sideways drift and heel. A yacht with an ordinary fixed keel will require at minimum 1.5-2m of depth but we are not limited to this. Draft is not only a problem in rivers but also in tidal areas so people have been creative by developing sailboats with retractable keels, ...


1

It is usually much easier to climb up a steep hill, than climb down again. Then you fall and die. It is usually much easier to eel your way into a tight spot than out again. You get stuck, you die. Similarly, it is much easier to enter a river, than to swim back to shore and climb out of it. You drown and die. Stop. Think. Observe. Pull Out. OR Pursue. Do ...


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