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32

Actually, it is often the opposite--many fords which are fine for humans are unsafe for a horse and rider, because the ground is too rocky, or the area is too narrow or steep, or the ford relies on some tool like stepping stones or a safety rope that the horse can't use. On the other hand, horse-safe fords can be muddier and deeper than those meant for ...


29

All waters no, some places like National Parks require permits, see Dinosaur Monument and Canyonlands. It also differs state by state, in some states the water belongs to the public but not the stream bed, so floating is fine but using an anchor is trespassing. In other states the public has a right to the water and the sides to the high water mark, so one ...


27

I've never taken an unpowered, hand-built raft out onto a commercial river, but I do have experience under sail and under power on the Columbia River in the United States. What I know about maritime law, tradition and etiquette might not be exactly what they expect in Europe, but I imagine the principles are much the same. In most cases, a craft without a ...


27

First off, weigh up whether it's worth crossing said river. I know this question is about if you "have" to cross it, but bear in mind that falling in is a real danger and if you do, hypothermia can onset very quickly and be deadly. It depends on the situation - if we're talking about a shallow, wade-able body of water that's not much more than a stream I'd ...


25

It depends on how many crossings. If very few, I do them barefoot and change. If there are a lot of crossings in a short distance I have shoes that I just wear for the entire hike. I'll cover both. General Rules Don't use rocks if you can avoid it. Stand on the bottom of the river. Just don't try rock hopping - you're asking for serious injury. (...


23

Don't violate Zebra Mussel restrictions!!! There are lots of lakes in Minnesota, and many of them are connected by streams. Its is great to paddle between them in a canoe, you can go tens of miles through dozens of lakes if you have the time and back strength. That being said, some lake have zebra mussels, and some don't. Minnesota DNR has restrictions ...


20

Upstreampaddling can be very exhausting, but in genereal it's more predictable than paddling downstream. I got my knowledge purely out of experience and not out of books, i paddled down the whole Rhine and in the process of it i had to change direction a few times, so i'll try to provide you with a rundown of the essential learnings. A River just flows ...


19

There is one more important technique you can use that I was taught in New Zealand, where you have to cross rivers all the time. If you have a group of people (at least 3), you can greatly enhance safety by forming a chain in the following way: Position the strongest person upstream, the second-strongest person downstream and the weakest person in the ...


19

It depends very much on the specific geography. But the idea of "whirlpools" that suck down people or entire ships, never to be seen again (which I suspect is what fascinates you) is largely a myth. The dangers aren't any different (and typically much smaller) than those posed by whitewater rapids in rivers. Specific dangers are: Being knocked against rocks ...


19

Horses are bigger and stronger and than humans and because of the square cube law, they have more mass to surface area which makes them better suited to fording deeper/faster rivers. As to whether or not you could cross where the horses do, that will depend on the individual crossing. You probably couldn't cross at all of the places horses can, but that ...


18

I think there would be many times when crossing barefoot would be fine. However, a number of potential risks do exist. Those can include: Getting scraped or cut on either the bottoms or sides of your feet. Culprits could be various sharp items, including broken shells, broken glass, pieces of fish hooks, bottle caps or other sharp litter. Stubbing your ...


17

With a large enough canoe, you can simply put the bike in the canoe, albeit somewhat precariously. What's more common though is for people to bike their canoe to an input, lock up the bike on shore, then return to it. A good alternative is a folding bike. They're not as efficient to ride for long distances, but can easily be fit inside a canoe. For just ...


17

Fishing in a river while wearing waders permits me to fish down stream and positioning my lures in the spot that is only possible while being in the water. This also helps me to avoid the many snags such as branches and tree trunks that are commonly found on the banks of many water ways. I can not tell you how many lures I have lost while fishing off the ...


16

The traditional tip is to cross at the widest point, where the river has the least power and is spread over a wider area. Often this is the most shallow point also. You will cross while facing upstream, but you can move slightly downstream to use some of the force of the current rather than working against it. If you are a group, lock arms and move in a line ...


16

The good news Navigating the Danube with a raft is certainly possible, and has been done: for instance, Flossbusters are a group of Dresdners who went all the way from Bertoldsheim to the Black Sea on a home-built raft over the course of five summers. Their craft, the good ship Dresden, looks quite similar to what you envisage: Source: flossbusters.de ...


16

These are main things that you would do. For most flow: Paddle upstream: What you'll do most of the time when there isn't much flow. Eddy-hop: Moving between the relatively still/upstream flowing parts of the river - they usually occur around bends at the sides of the river, outcrops rock in the middle of the flow or sides or, at nodes in waves(and the ...


16

Thank you to nhinkle who posted the answer that showed it is possible to put a bike in an canoe. I have something over 100 miles of canoeing with a bike and a dolly in my canoe now. I started with the bike and the dolly laying in the bottom of the canoe. But it took up lots of floor space and everything tended to get tangled together. I put the dolly in ...


15

OK, this isn't a hypothetical question. You will have to ford numerous rivers fed directly from glaciers if you hike in the Swedish mountains. These are extremely cold, very rapid streams with rocks everywhere. Some basic advice is: Use a rod or stick as support. You should always lean on two points - two legs or one leg and the rod. Never have your hip ...


15

I have a 17.5' Clipper Tripper, and I live in Southern Alberta, which means I sometimes get caught on the water in Chinook winds (90km/h gusts), I know what it feels like to get tossed around in the wind like a wind sock. Unless you have a heavy load to keep the bow down, or someone in the bow that can help you out, your best option is to paddle the canoe ...


15

I would suggest not sleeping on the boat. Apart from the safety issues this will bring up - the boat could slowly lose air, or could start drifting away, the water could rise, ... - it will not protect you against wind or rain. So in any case, the least I'd suggest for you to get is a good tarp or a rain-proof bivouac sleeping bag. A tent is obviously even ...


15

No. Water use, like everything else in the US, is a patchwork of Federal, State, and Local regulations plus quasi-legal muscle. Multiple overlapping laws and agencies can apply at each level. Here's some examples in my home state of Oregon. Oswego Lake In Oregon ORS 537.110 flatly states "All water within the state from all sources of water supply belongs ...


14

They sell fiberglass repair kits at most boating stores which are made for this exact sort of repair. It includes a fiber glass cloth which you put over the damaged area, as well as a resin / hardening agent to hold the patch in place. Any kit you buy should have instructions for applying the patch in it.


14

This is highly dependent on the type of water as well as the location, but I'll summarise a few things to be aware of. In many locations most of these dangers won't factor in, but they're useful things to bear in mind if you're trying to assess the danger of a particular body of water. I'll focus on the sea here - for other things such as rivers similar ...


14

Don't, unless you know the route very well and are sure the rivers can pose no danger. Travel the day before so you arrive to the trailhead before it gets dark, then spend the night at the trailhead. Big river crossings at night are too dangerous. A headlight will only do so much as the light will just reflect off the surface. You won't be able to tell ...


13

If you want to remain stationary, you need a solid anchor, and the best option is going to be to attach to a tree or something that you can securely fix to on the bank. Not knowing that river, I can't say whether that would work or not, so I'll discuss anchoring to the bottom. This is the same procedure for anchoring in a tide or a river, except in a river ...


13

While I was crossing a stream, I was caught in one such but not so serious kind of a strainer. We call that strainers. These are formed when some obstacles get piled up and let a very narrow window for a person to pass through, but the water pass through it. Most of the strainers that you will (unfortunately) come across are likely to be formed by trees and ...


12

Wile the faint of heart might find this answer disturbing, Yes it is fine to sleep on an inflatable boat, if it is durable thick rubber like a Zodiak. I have done so many times, and find it quite relaxing even on the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. These after all are life raft level construction. You are actually safer in a boat on the water than in a tent,...


12

I guess the answer really is It depends As a general purpose solution I normally bring sturdy trekking/hiking sandals on my trips. Something like the models from Teva for example (many pictures on Google). I specifically look for models with have sturdy rubber soles with good profiles, and which come with velcro straps that I can fasten/adjust quickly and ...


12

We're planning to take our dog kayaking in the not so distant future. We both have two Sit on Top Kayaks which easily leave him room to sit between my feet. If you can fit him in your cockpit in a sit in kayak then it shouldn't be an issue either. From below you can see a section in the back where you can add bags etc (with a elastic string to keep it in ...


11

I will not recommend crossing if the bridge is only composed of frozen snow because snow does not support a lot of weight. You should check the following: The ice should be at least 15 cm thick (be careful to differentiate the frozen snow from the clear ice, the 15 cm applies only to clear ice) The bridge should not contain any water on it (sign of melting ...


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