New answers tagged

1

As other answers have said, you need a map which shows contour lines. From seeing which end of the river is higher, you can work out which way it's flowing. Google Maps does do this, but it's not very user friendly. First, turn on "Terrain" from the "layers". This will show you a shaded map giving a rough clue to the shape of the ...


12

In addition mostly to @csk's answer, there are maps that give the direction of rivers, e.g. OpenTopomap For most parts of the world, this information is redundant at the first glance since you can see the overall (larger) shape of the valleys in the map and follow the valley until it is clear whether you go upriver or downriver, but there are some ...


9

The answer is often to not use Google maps, and this is no exception. If you want an online source, Openstreetmap.org can help - the cycling layer shows contours so you can use the methods in another answer, but if you're at a PC and select "Edit" the default editor shows arrows pointing downstream. As cbeleites unhappy with SX says in another ...


42

USGS has a web map called Streamer that will let you trace a stream or river in the US. If you click on a point on a river, it will highlight every part of the river that's downstream of that point. Or you can choose the "trace upstream" option and it will highlight everything upstream of that point. For example, here's everything upstream of ...


12

Look up a topographic map ("topo"), such as the USGS maps, which are free online. These maps show elevations. As a quick and dirty expedient, you can also just try zooming out and seeing which end of the river drains to the ocean, or which end is up high in mountains or hills. I can imagine that this might not always work, e.g., if the river flows ...


Top 50 recent answers are included