Hot answers tagged

26

You are indeed correct that robins use their eyes individually as they tilt their head from side to side. It's known as monocular vision, and is how they, and many other birds, locate their food, primarily worms and grubs. In May, 1965, an ornithologist named Dr. Frank Heppner published a 10-page report entitled Sensory Mechanisms and Environmental Clues ...


10

American Robin, Source European Robin Source They are from different families of birds, The American robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. It is named after the European robin3 because of its reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related, with the European robin belonging to the Old World ...


9

They eat them. It's true, egg shells are edible, and birds will eat them. Mommy robin probably snacked on the shells while she was sitting on her babies keeping them warm. After laying their eggs, birds are rather depleted of calcium, and eagerly eat the shells up to replenish those minerals. Eggs shells are actually a recommended food for bird feeders. ...


9

According to The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, American Robins are indeed found in wild places like woodlands, forests, and mountains. Because worms hibernate, the winter robins feed primarily on berries, found on trees and shrubs in the woods. The Ohio DNR Division of Wildlife lists robins as native to Ohio. Some migrators travel through but there is a ...


8

One unusual thing about robins is that they're territorial all year round. Combined with the way they sing from prominent spots to mark out their territory, this makes them really rather obvious in the winter, when other birds are quiet and inconspicuous. Robins, as well as being plentiful, are also quite confiding around humans, mainly in the UK where we ...


8

Robins are an all year round bird in the UK: RSPB with its bright red breast it is familar throughout the year and especially at Christmas! Males and females look identical, and young birds have no red breast and are spotted with golden brown. So this proves, for those of a keen eye, that there's inherently nothing special about the Robin Male vs Female,...


5

I've certainly seen robins in woods (I'm in Scotland) but I've also noticed how much the populations of different bird species vary with location. There might just not be that many robins in your local woodland. Edit: American robins and European robins are apparently quite different. However, my comment above is probably still valid.


5

The robin should be quite capable of building the nest on her own. Almost anywhere there should be enough dried grass and small twigs around. It is unlikely your robin is having trouble finding building material. The best thing you can do for the robin family is to give them space. For your own enjoyment and perhaps that of others, you might install a ...


5

I don't know for sure, but your suggestion seems right. As you can see on the picture you posted, these birds have their eyes on the side of their head which means that they quite surely are not able to see things right in front of their beak. So by turning their head they can look at their prey with one eye (no stereo vision but with better detail) before ...


4

I live in the UK and the first time I noticed Robin's nesting was in the top of a down pipe. Unfortunately the heavens opened and we had flash floods. The water filled up and the 6 babies died despite taking them to a rescue centre. I put up 2 Robin nest boxes directly underneath and around. Within 3 days they nested again. Each year I'm really lucky to have ...


4

We have one spot under our back deck where Robin's make a nest every year, last year we had a nest with five eggs: Every year, we did absolutely nothing to help them out, and they always did just fine. I did think that I could have helped a bit by giving them a couple worms when I poked my head in to take a look. Every time they'd hear something near by the ...


4

You don't see robins in the woods for the same reason you don't see prarie dogs there either; it's not their habitat. Notice that most of the time when you see a robin, it's hopping along the ground in some open space, or in a tree near some open space.


3

I am not a robin or even a bird expert; this answer is solely from googling "Do robins mate for life?" From Journey North American Robin -- Annenberg Media http://www.learner.org/jnorth/search/RobinNotes2.html "No, robins do not mate for life. Pairs usually remain together during an entire breeding season, which can involve two or three nestings. However,...


2

Pretty much any, the bird feeds you get from the garden centres are normally very informative, you can see what to feed different birds for different seasons. If you get a multi-feeder, so basically a pole you can hang different types of feeders on you can accommodate a range of birds. You can however get Robin specific feeders, take a look here: RSPB bird ...


1

Apparently American Robins migrate for the winter (hence the official name) but in reality they often don't and form 'nomadic flocks' that find good berry trees etc to live near in the cold months. But the British/European Robin is not migratory and always solitary (except when mated) and is always highly defensive of its personal territory. American Robins ...


1

Yes and no; As a breeding/home territory robins do not like thick woods. They prefer an open woodland typical of single home suburbs ( in US). They want some open ground for foraging. Goldfinches like similar open woodlands. However , I see the large migrating flocks of robins in the thick forest ( E TX, piney woods).These loose flocks contain many thousands ...


1

Placement of the eyes on either side of the head widens the field of vision making it difficult to sneak up on the prey animal. It limits the area of binocular vision but comes with clear benefits. Tipping the head allows the bird to focus their vision on a specific location/item. Science Direct - Bird Vision


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible