New answers tagged

5

If you start a route, fall, lower down a bit, and then climb to the top, most people would not say that you have sent the route. See What is the term for completing a climbing route uncleanly?. Most people think of sending a route as climbing it cleanly. If you start a route, fall, lower to the ground, and then climb the route cleanly, that is clearly 2 ...


0

Another thing to consider with professional climbers is that they constantly train finger strength, meaning, doing a two finger pull-up is very common and much easier for them than the average climbers. Its kind of like holding a really good hold. A 'good' hold is relative to the climber, and a crimp or a pocket that may be 'bad' for us may be really good ...


2

A few things not otherwise mentioned in other answers: Grip depends on how much pressure you can exert via your fingers. Often times it is not advantageous to just get as much skin on there as you can. A good example is the occasional sloper - if you try to smear your whole hand on it it's much harder to not slip off versus just driving your tips down like ...


7

I think it is easiest to understand if you think about a small pocket where you can fit a single finger in deeply and securely or jam two fingers in poorly. While it is always nice to distribute the weight between two fingers instead of one finger, sometimes the grip you get on a hold is much better with one finger than with two fingers. For the hold shown ...


11

Every time a climber finds a way to place more fingers on a hold, he/she will. If he/she is not using all fingers, it's because: They're training their fingers to get stronger, It's impossible to place more fingers on the hold, They have injured fingers they do not want to use and worsen, They're careless because the route is too easy for them.


12

When racking up, you have a spectrum of possibilities between two extremes: At one end, you could put every single piece of gear on the same carabiner. While the weight savings would be incredible, it would be an absolute pain to place a piece. At the opposite end, you could rack every single piece of pro on its own carabiner. You pay a penalty in weight (...


4

For Great Britain, with both climbers beginning at the foot of the next pitch, with leader L and second S: LOn belay: I'm tied to the rope and prepared to climb SClimb when ready: I am now belaying you LClimbing: I know you're belaying me; expect to pay out now LSlack (or rope colour), Take in, or Tight as needed during the climb; also Below! when required ...


4

@BenCrowell describes the sequence nicely and @Jasper brings up reducing commands. Due to circumstances (no visual contact and out of earshot) and simply to reduce the yelling on the mountain (both for the pleasure of silence and security, as there is less that could be misunderstood, especially on crowded sections) it is beneficial to do so. I'll give an ...


5

The German mountaineer and safety expert Pit Schubert advocates to reduce the signals down to two: (I'm reusing @Ben Crowell's terms since I know only the German words) Leader to belay: "Alice, off belay" (German: "Stand!") when the leader has built their own anchor point. If there is a line of sight to the belayer, the leader may also show both hands as a ...


5

Alice and Betty are climbing in a team of two. Let's start the cycle with both climbers together at a belay, both tied in to the anchor with clove hitches. Betty is going to lead the next pitch. The standard set of voice signals in America, which I'll use below, are the ones introduced by Paul Petzoldt. When the climbers address each other by name, it's so ...


2

Technically speaking, no. For a Grigri to work, the cam must engage, so asking if it works when the cam does not, the answer is: no. Can it be used to belay? Yes, but it will be more difficult on falls than an ATC. The sharp angles of the rope going through an ATC provide the friction to ease controlling the rope. The strength required to stop a fall can ...


3

Besides super glue, as some do not want to go that route, here is another option. You also mentioned that you cut it off. This can actually slow the healing process as it will dry out the skin underneath the flapper. The best solution I found and experienced was to clean up the wound, which will hurt at first but is necessary, and then leave the skin ...


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