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Disclaimer: I don't climb. Pharmacies sell fabric kneepads for ~5EUR, those would protect from scratches while bouldering: For actual climbing, bicycle kneepads can protect you from swinging into the wall but approach 60EUR. These are hardening upon impact gel + kevlar: and these are hardshell, so they won't rip after being scratched every day for an year, ...


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TL/DR: There are no real codified rules in climbing itself. There is common sense and some mostly environmental regulations. Other than that you are free to do what you want. If you want a starting point take the articles on etiquette in climbing magazines or by alpine clubs Long version As Ben Crowell points out in his answer, rock climbing used to be a ...


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There are also different styles of climbing, and the expectations are different for the different styles, for practical reasons. In trad climbing, which wasn't originally distinguished from mountaineering, it was traditionally considered bad style for the leader to fall, basically because with hemp ropes it was dangerous as hell. Sport climbing upended this ...


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Climbing chalk is almost always magnesium carbonate (MgCO3; source: ClimberNews). Liquid chalk is just a suspension of magnesium carbonate in a low vapour pressure liquid, something like acetone or ethanol, which will evaporate quickly and leave you with dry chalk on the hands (and significantly cooler hands too, much like hand sanitizers). Magnesium ...


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We hate to use the term "safer" in climbing, but here's a method to manage risk a little more appropriately. Using this method, we'll never be off belay, and we'll never be trusting our life to a single piece Evaluate your last point of attachment. We're looking for the best anchor that we can make. Realistically, that's likely to be the newest, ...


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