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0

Just use the rule that you're not allowed to touch a hold with a hand until you've first touched it with a foot.


12

From the technical side I do not see any major issues. Assuming you made a proper, redundant top-rope anchor, your main concern should be a possible sharp edge at the top which can be countered with a rope protector if necessary. If there are more sharp edges and you are worried, using double ropes is always a good option, albeit often unnecessary. (I am ...


10

This is a well-known problem, escpecially on sport routes that have been bolted on rappel and have a bolt placed every like 2m in a straight line. The only real solution is to ask someone involved in bolting the route or doing the first ascent. Even then, as sports climbing involves free choice of holds, there might be something they have overlooked ...


4

The Basics Tying in, ropework, belaying, commands and common sense transfer quite well from rock climbing. At least from trad. Someone with rock climbing experience could certainly top rope on ice or follow an experienced leader with only some brief instructions. The climbing Ice climbing technique is quite different from (most) rock climbing. A rock ...


5

There are some helpful basics like tieing into a rope and belaying that directly transfer from rock to ice climbing as they are the same regardless of the conditions. Further transferable skills mainly depend on what kind of rock climbing you do. Sports climbing is a lot less helpful than trad climbing. Trusting your own protection is an essential skill in ...


1

I'm not a climber so this is a non-expert thought that was nearly just a comment. Could something have changed affecting your ability to hold awkward positions, perhaps a loss of suppleness if your break was caused by injury or being too busy? I say this because when I get those legs it's often that I'm holding a tricky position for some reason, like ...


11

Most likely this is not a problem of physical power or endurance. A moderately active person should have sufficiently trained legs for climbing. This is especially true for the beginner end of the difficulty range where footholds can be stood on passively (as opposed to actively pulling oneself towards the wall with the feet). Disco legs are typically a ...


3

This is very dangerous, the plastic retaining loop is not load bearing and it can be absent or broken, even if it holds your weight you can cause an uncontrollable fall in your second by simply tripping and tension on this carbiner can prevent the autoblocking function from operating at all Consider also that auto-blocking devices are usually most critical ...


6

I would definitely discourage this. Accidentially releasing the device is dangerous and can lead to fatal incidents. Moreover, releasing the device is rarely needed to my experience. Therefore this does not make the risk any more acceptable. An engaged ATC in guidemode can easily be released by hooking a carabiner into the little hole at the front and ...


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