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6

It appears to be an Anchor Bend, which Wikipedia lists as being #1723, #1841 in ABoK. (Anchor Bend knot, Public Domain from Wikipedia) I found it by initially thinking the knot in your picture looked a little like a round turn with two half hitches, but with only one half hitch, and it being through the wrong place. That page on Wikipedia though led me to ...


5

First, try with more 'coils', when you tie the taut-line hitch; every coil adds some friction. An alternative, that I, myself, like a lot, since I find it easier to tie, is the Farrimond Friction Hitch. And again here, if your rope is slippery, wet or stiff, add some more loops/coils, and make sure you 'dress' the hitch so it's good and tight. A major ...


4

Since I'm guilty of the comment in question and referring to climbing ropes in particular. The key to the comment is that they're more sensitive to damage, not that they're more vulnerable to it. What they're specifically vulnerable to is hidden damage. If the core is damaged, the rope is significantly weakened but it's really hard to tell from a surface ...


2

In general, the answer is most likely no. With regard to (at least) one specific scenario, however, kernmantle ropes are thought to be less resilient than twisted rope. Consider the case when one rope (rope1) is used to tie a load into the middle of another rope (rope2). Rope1 is first turned in a few coils around rope2, and then somehow fastened. Rope2 ...


2

Try a sheep shank to create a loop, then run round the peg and tie off. This gives you an easily tensioned and tied off pulley system. You could also use a truckers hitch in much the same way, but my scout leader was a fan of the sheep shank and it's rubbed off on me. It's slightly slower to adjust than a midshipman's hitch but it also holds better under ...


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