Hot answers tagged

34

I use a truckers hitch it is easy to make and create and pull tight. It is not difficult to untie but does stay in place well. It is a great knot when you need to cinch something down. Image source https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:TruckersHitchUsingAlpineButterfly2.jpg


28

If you don't have an electric hot-knife, it's possible to heat a (sacrificial) table knife in a flame until it glows, and use that to make the cut against a wooden block. It doesn't need to be sharp, just hot. I find that I normally need two cuts (with the knife heated until glowing slightly red each time) to chop and seal 11mm static rope. Keep the knife ...


24

It's possible that it could damage the soft gear, Tests done by the UIAA Safety Commission and some rope manufacturers have shown that marking ropes with liquids such as those provided by felt-tipped pens can damage them; even with those markers, sold specifically for marking ropes. The test results have shown a decrease of up to 50% of the rope ...


21

I agree that the trucker's hitch will certainly do the job. That said, if your special situation requires retightening if things start to sag, you might consider the tautline hitch. It's a great knot for situations where you might need to take up slack due to stuff like rope stretch in the dark and rain (like, say, if you're using your line to make an A-...


13

As others have commented, Trucker's Hitch (with an Alpine butterfly) would be the best. Note that it would be enough to do it on one side only; I usually tie an Anchor Hitch at the other side. Another option, when you won't be loading the rope too much, would be to use an Adjustable Midshipman's Hitch. As a bonus, you could easily re-tighten the rope by ...


12

Although you asked an outdoors question, I'm going to give you a physics answer that might shed some light (with an outdoors note at the end.) When you string an ideal rope (with zero stretch) horizontally between two ideal vertical trees (with zero give), and then hang an object from the center, the horizontal force pulling on the two trees is... infinitely ...


11

You don't need a knot, just add a few rounds of rope around the tree and the friction will make it more or less impossible to "pull" the rope and create sag (besides, a few extra rounds prevents the rope from sliding downwards). Basically any knot will work after this although two half-hitches is a good option. An alternative to the extra rounds is to simply ...


11

At one end, I tie the rope any old how. It can be loose even. Then I go to the other tree and pull as hard as I can on the rope until it's really tight. Then, holding tight, I walk around the tree several times until the turns of the rope round the trunk are doing most of the work of holding it tight. Then I can tie it off. If things slipped a little while I ...


11

The easiest way to do this is to use an electric rope cutter. Source To use this you wait till the blade is hot then stretch the rope tight with your hands giving yourself a couple of inches on either side of where you want to cut and bring it down across the blade. The blade will go through the rope like a hot knife through butter and seal the ends at the ...


9

I think this falls into that grey area where you shouldn't do it but it probably won't cause problems if you really want to use it. I personally wouldn't use it. There's so much quality climbing gear out there and slings are cheap. We're far beyond the time when Royal Robbins hammered lumber into cracks for fall protection. In my opinion the apparent ...


8

If you're after getting tension into the line, I'd normally use a Truckers Hitch. This uses a loop to create a pulley - and there are various ways to make the loop. I tend to prefer either an Alpine Butterfly (as it doesn't get hard to undo after tensioning) or the loop of a slippery overhand knot (as it can be undone easily). If you have issues losing ...


6

Just a reasonably sharp knife and a tape are fine. First use a sticky tape (better cotton, rather than electric - the climbing tape for finger taping is fine) around the place of the cut. Then cut through the tape and use heat of a small gas flame or outdoors even just a lighter to connect the threads by melting to prevent fraying. The tape can remain there ...


6

First, try with more 'coils', when you tie the taut-line hitch; every coil adds some friction. An alternative, that I, myself, like a lot, since I find it easier to tie, is the Farrimond Friction Hitch. And again here, if your rope is slippery, wet or stiff, add some more loops/coils, and make sure you 'dress' the hitch so it's good and tight. A major ...


6

It appears to be an Anchor Bend, which Wikipedia lists as being #1723, #1841 in ABoK. (Anchor Bend knot, Public Domain from Wikipedia) I found it by initially thinking the knot in your picture looked a little like a round turn with two half hitches, but with only one half hitch, and it being through the wrong place. That page on Wikipedia though led me to ...


5

You can tie the rope to one tree using a knot of your choosing, depending on the application. The other end you fit using a prusik knot, which is easy to tie. You can tie this knot while the rope is loose, then slide it along to make it as tight as you need it to be. I use this for my hammock Ridgeline and with a bit of practice, it's extremely easy and ...


5

Some manufacturers state that soft goods such as ropes and dogbones can be damaged by markers so it is best practice not to mark them with sharpies or other generic markers. If you do wish to mark them, there are special markers designed for the purpose. For example, see this one by Beal.


5

It's unclear if you're asking about sewn slings or single lengths of webbing--so I'll answer each separately below. The most important thing when using webbing (sewn loop slings or single lengths) is that any knots should leave the webbing laying flat. There should be as few twists as possible in your system, and none in the knot itself, as these decrease ...


5

If you don't have a hot knife or professional rope trimmer/cutter, you can use a very sharp (fresh) single-edge razor blade. Make the cut and then seal the end of the rope with an open flame or a flame from a butane-fueled "jet lighter." If done slowly and patiently you'll be able to gently fuse the kern to the mantle and the end should look nice and ...


5

Look for any type of line that is meant for running rigging on a sailboat. These lines are made to work with pulleys or block and tackle systems, they have very good strength with more than adequate working load limits, and they can withstand the weather for quite a while. The main idea is to have a polyester sheath for UV protection. For a backup, I would ...


4

These thimbles are primarily used for fixed point attachment. They're used on yachts and sailing dinghies for stays, halyards and jib mounts. Spliced onto the end of the rope they're for loops and semi-permanent anchors, or where you need to attach two very different materials via a D-shackle or equivalent. Climbers use rope-carabiner-rope for their ...


4

Even though I am late on this, I'd like to try to give you some answers on your questions. I am volunteering in the german mountain rescue service, but I am in no way an expert in climbing security - so please take everything below with a grain of salt. 1.1 We use redundancies for virtually every type of rescue but there is usually a lot more weight ...


4

General Answer Sterling Accessory Cord is probably somewhat ideal for your weight specs while still being a reasonable price. Stronger than what you are looking and from a very reputable brand. I use sterling accessory cord all the time; it is a staple in my whitewater kayaking rescue kit for prussics. They have a bunch of sizes, but here are three in your ...


4

Since I'm guilty of the comment in question and referring to climbing ropes in particular. The key to the comment is that they're more sensitive to damage, not that they're more vulnerable to it. What they're specifically vulnerable to is hidden damage. If the core is damaged, the rope is significantly weakened but it's really hard to tell from a surface ...


3

(Maybe not a great answer, but too long for a comment.) I guess this would all depend on how much tension we're talking and how much extra line you'll have (and whether you have another set of hands). When I'm trussing a roast, I use a surgeon's knot to help maintain a small amount of tension while I finish the knot. You use the multiple wraps to build in ...


2

I am not a climber. These should work in the sense that they are unlikely to fail. But be sure you understand both the original purpose and the history of the sling: A: Some emergency stuff -- tow straps come to mind -- aren't designed for long term use. B: Some gear is not well stabilized for UV resistance. Their normal cycle may be to be used hard ...


2

My only concerns would be around its tear resistance (in case of rubbing against a sharp bit of the tree) and bend radius. If those are appropriate, then it should work as a sling. Be aware that it will have no elasticity, so you'll still want to build in whatever "give" you need, but a short sling of any kind won't give much either.


2

Try a sheep shank to create a loop, then run round the peg and tie off. This gives you an easily tensioned and tied off pulley system. You could also use a truckers hitch in much the same way, but my scout leader was a fan of the sheep shank and it's rubbed off on me. It's slightly slower to adjust than a midshipman's hitch but it also holds better under ...


2

You need to be looking for semi-static rope, as used by cavers for SRT, usually of thickness between 8.5 and 11.0 mm. It's normally sold in 200-metre reels, though most retailers will cut to a specific length for you. The only difference to caving rope is that some specialist canyon ropes are designed to be less dense than water, so they float rather than ...


2

All of these require slack. If you need to tension the system to bring the ends together, find a longer piece of rope, the one you're using is too short. Reef (Square) knot Easily tied, everyone knows it, the only problem is that tying it under tension requires 3 hands. Sheet bend (because you've mentioned it) Not really designed for tying under tension, ...


2

In general, the answer is most likely no. With regard to (at least) one specific scenario, however, kernmantle ropes are thought to be less resilient than twisted rope. Consider the case when one rope (rope1) is used to tie a load into the middle of another rope (rope2). Rope1 is first turned in a few coils around rope2, and then somehow fastened. Rope2 ...


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