Hot answers tagged

14

There are two factors to care about here: a static rope and a rope that is slightly too thick. Static ropes are usually less flexible than dynamic rope, which would explain the stubborn feeling. 0.5mm of thickness is generally nothing to worry about. The main concerns with the manufacturer-approved ranges of rope thickness are safety and "user ...


5

Here are four variations on the bowline, in words and graphics. Note that all four of them are here left not fully dressed (not tightened). In each case, the standing part should be pulled, or at least held firm, to tighten the knot. If, instead, you pull on the working end without holding the standing part -- and this seems to be your problem -- the knot ...


4

The bowline is an interesting example of a knot which fails if dressed wrongly - even if it has been tied correctly. If you tighten a bowline by pulling on the working end, or by pulling the loop apart, it can invert to a running noose. Tighten it by pulling the standing end to avoid this. Here is a loose bowline: Pulling the working end (and the right-hand ...


2

Going around a 90-degree corner will produce a force on the bolt 40% greater than the tension in the rope. (I.e., greater by a factor of the square root of 2.) The force on the anchor will be about the same as if there had not been a 90-degree bend, but it will be slightly less because of friction. This is nothing to worry about. The forces generated by ...


2

I have used natural fiber rupees, hemp and jute, for a number of years for yoga type activities where repeated handling of the rope is common. What I have always understood is that "industrial" rope, such as that you would get from hardware stores and the like, is manufactured using some chemicals that are not healthy over time. Of course, buying ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible