Hot answers tagged

128

When travelling on extremely remote roads, you need to prepare for the worst. This is even more true if you are travelling in a climate where the weather might kill you within days, such as in extreme cold. I've had a car break down once at -35°C. That road in Northern Sweden wasn't as remote as the one in Siberia you describe, as it still had maybe two ...


50

First, if you go somewhere in a car, take along the clothes necessary to be outside for an extended period. 406 MHz PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) All the tragedies have one thing in common: they did not have one of these and/or did not activate it. This is the gold-standard, same as aircraft ELTs and ship EPIRBs and works worldwide on the COSPAS-SARSAT ...


46

Well, I'm from Russia, and I heard that in the most desperate situation like this you can burn your car's tires. The tires are made of oil, so they burn well. Using fire from tires you can use other car parts that burn well, like a seat. This will allow you to last at least for a day and if you're driving a big car, like a semi, you can last several days. ...


21

I have always learned that when you go to remote areas you should have at least a basic knowledge of car repair and depending on the make of car and the area you go to your knowledge should be good to expert. So your first action should be looking whether you can repair it, with what you have and where you are. If that is not possible, you go to what the ...


20

This is not constrained to Siberia. A snowstorm/blizzard can occur at many locations and throw down so much snow that roads are blocked and people outside the main routes (or even on main routes) get trapped. As most of the answers give good advice on preparation (telling the route and estimated time of arrival, having a kit and good clothing or even an PLB)...


12

There are times when a car will not drive, but its engine will run. In such cases, if you can spare the fuel, use the engine to generate heat. Ventilation from time to time would help prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. If the engine won’t run, perhaps the battery is fully charged. All of that power will produce a decent amount of heat if you can rig ...


11

I live in Siberia. First, clean roads in winter are used by traffic. Minor ground tracks get covered by snow and impossible to use in first weeks of winter. If you're driving down a highway in winter, it means it's been cleaned by tractors, and this only happens in important roads. So at least minimal traffic must be there, even in remote areas. If you're ...


10

The Khibin mountains and the neighboring area are very popular places to visit in Russia, especially for hiking. There is one relatively big town there - Kirovsk, and you can start your trip from there. It has some industry, but I haven't heard of it having any bad influence on the ecology. I have drunk water from Umbozero lake and Umba river and I'm still ...


10

Basic car survival kit Flares Dehydrated food Signal mirror Map and compass (not for hiking. Need to know what direction the nearest people would be to use the sinal mirror effectively) Water (at least 1 gal, more if you will be more than 50 miles from help at any point) Battery operated multi-channel handheld radio (many places have relays along the ...


10

If you are hundreds of miles away from anyone else, getting out of the car and walking is a stupid idea. Chances are you'll die before reaching anyone or you get lost. If someone goes out looking for you they'll probably take the road/fly along the road to search for you, so as long as you stay close to the road eventually they'll find our car. Thus, keeping ...


8

One of the best things you can do in this situation is actually what you could do before it happens: bring preparations. Other comments have already mentioned different items already and ultimately you need to have brought those with you for them to be of any use, or what you lack in items you need skills to make up for them. Whether by items or skills, you ...


7

It's meter per second. See the more detailed legend explanation at this huge pdf The text means "Arrows that show rivers' flow direction (0.2 is a speed of the flow in m/s)"


7

Everybody seems to be addressing survival tips; so I want to instead focus on restarting that car to get back. While all cars/trucks behave differently, its important to understand how diesel vs gasoline engines work. But generally speaking, in severe cold you need to cover the cars radiator to maintain heat within the engine; perhaps with something more ...


6

I read an article somewhere, about a family who got stuck in the cold. They were able to start a fire, and heat rocks. The hot rocks were brought into the car, and of course the cold rocks were placed back into the fire and swapped on regular intervals.


5

Disclaimer, my car broke in extreme cold in Siberia many times. Many things were already said, I just want to share my own experience from living in rural Siberia for 5 winters in a row. We do not travel in Siberian winter, instead we run from A to B, we do quick short well planned runs. Advice: know the map very well, know which direction and how far is ...


4

Layers of fleece plus a very wind resistant outer shell. Anything else (Carhartt type clothes, leather, Mongolian reindeer skins...) will be heavy as heck. Full face coverage would be smart, but it looks like you'll have a windshield at least. Since you'll spend time riding in the cold wind, the conditions will be similar to snowmobiling. Try snowmobiling ...


4

People here are posting horror stories about being 30km from nearest habitation (this is walkable distance). If you're in Siberia, you're likely to be 300km from nearest habitation on a road with traffic some 2 cars/week. So if your car broke, you die. It happens (often) in Siberia. Never ever travel alone/in a single car. So, you can try call for help via ...


3

Alternative answer in case you can't reliably come up with a good fuel solution: buy an alternative burner for your Trangia stove. If finding ethanol fuel is too much of a hassle it might be worth considering buying a gas burner for the Trangia stove you already have. See for example here on the Trangia home page. These burners can be used interchangeably ...


1

Answer is work in progress! Still working on the translation. Help is welcome — my Russian is very limited. There are several relevant pages on the park website (all in Russian). At the Инструкция по технике безопасности на маршруте (instructions for safe techniques on the route) there is no mention of bears — the instructions are about camping, rafting, ...


1

As far as I know, there are no specific ice axe test requirements in Russia. I didn't find any GOST standard for an ice axe as well. So, if your ice axe isn't UIAA certified you can just guess about whether it's reliable or not.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible