14

It isn't that unusual to use 8mm rope in caving on vertical (at least in Europe) especially in deeper caves with more rope to carry down and of course, back out again. In the US cavers tend to rig pitches from a single anchor and take care that there are no sharp bits of rock the rope could come in contact with and use rope which is more abrasion-resistant. ...


13

A number of prominent climbing organizations (e.g. International Federation of Sport Climbing) either recommend or require two locking carabiners for clip-in attachment to a harness, e.g. IFSC Rules 2015 [1MB DOC] 8.3.5 The climbing rope shall be connected to the competitor's harness by two Screwgate or Self-Locking Karabiners arranged in opposition (i....


11

It is never advisable to use any safety gear that you do not know the history of. Doesn't matter if it is legit, what matters is the history of the rope. If it's a club rope for climbing then there should be a record of usage and falls. If no record exists, then it is unknown whether the rope has taken any significant falls or if it is still safe to use. ...


11

Sometimes, especially where permits are required, it is mandatory to fill out the sign-in/sign out books. Usually they are at trailheads, although I could see them on a particular piece or trail and perhaps shelters along the way. However, mandatory or not, it is almost always a good idea to put your information down on any sign-in sheets and to sign any ...


10

Are climbing harnesses tested for upside down falls? ... No. Harnesses have forces gradually applied to them of up to 15kN while attached to a dummy; the dummy is oriented in the head-up position and the force is applied as if a person was hanging from the belay loop. Alternatively, the harness belt is placed around a cylinder and forces are gradually ...


9

Yes, there is an EN standard that regulates how crampons should behave to get the EN certification. Unfortunately the guide is not available for free, as far as I know. The UIAA reccomendations mostly rely on top of the EU ones. The only added requirement by UIAA is: In the information to be supplied the manufacturer shall draw attention to the dangers ...


8

No. An industrial shock absorber cannot be used as a via ferrata set, because: Via ferrata sets are intended to absorb falls that exceed a person's height. EN 355 (industrial absorbers) mentions a drop test that involves a 100kg mass being dropped from 1.75m such that the final resultant force cannot exceed 6kN. The EN 958 (via ferrata sets) drop test ...


7

I'm answering here because I don't think it would fit as a comment but I believe others might have a better answer. Is each cam, stopper, and carabiner individually tested? Maybe. It will depend on the manufacturer. Usually a few samples from a batch go through tests. That's why when you hear about recall, they know which batch to recall. Here is kind of ...


7

The new labeling system gives each PFD not one type, but three attributes ranked on a spectrum: buoyancy, turning power, and size. The label adds a fourth attribute listing suggested activities for which this PFD is best suited. Let's look at these one at a time: Buoyancy: Will be given by a letter class from A to E. Class A provides the most buoyancy, E ...


6

Most firearms regulations (and certainly best practices) require the firearm itself and its ammunition to be protected by separate, independent locks. Gun safes typically help you meet this requirement with a locked compartment for the ammunition within the main safe. Modern ammunition is pretty stable, so there's no real danger of it firing unexpectedly ...


5

As EN norms are not publicly available and quite costly, I can't confirm for sure that there is no temperature testing - but from what I hear there is none. If anyone can authoritatively confirm or deny this, please write a comment. The first impulse is to look into fire-fighting resources. Problem there: Their requirement far exceed what a climber is ...


5

Safety guidelines for this smoker specifically state that it's not suitable for indoor use. It's quite literally the first thing on the instructions https://www.riversidegardencentre.co.uk/pdf/2009_Smokey_Mountain_Cooker.pdf DANGER Failure to follow the Dangers, Warnings, and Cautions contained in this Owner’s Manual may result in serious bodily ...


5

It's basically a unwritten law which can be used to give beginners an overview about the "core rules" while hiking. Due to the fact that it isn't something official, there are many different versions out there. However, it basically always contains this: It is important to leave the trail in the same shape you find it. The following Trail User’s Code ...


5

I did a bit of research and it appears that NFPA 1983 is a standard for ropes used in technical rescue, similar to UIAA ratings for climbing ropes. The tag you found seems to imply that this rope meets the specifications of the 2001 edition of NFPA standard 1983 for a life safety rope. I couldn't find a free copy of the 2001 standard, but in the 2012 edition ...


5

The carabiners are definitely good to go as those are pretty standard ratings. Most climbers using climbing harnesses and not body harnesses, I would suggest that you buy a climbing harness as I think that it would work better and be more comfortable for you.


5

It looks like the answer is that it depends on the direction, wind speed, terrain and type of chairlift. The ski area you are going to might keep statistics on how often the wind makes the use of chairlifts unsafe or whether or not they think the lifts will be open for those dates. "It's really a matter of wind speed as well as wind direction and that ...


4

I've not done any formal testing and am hesitant to recommend such an arrangement, however over the past 15 years climbing I have in many situations either used or seen others use such harnesses and had no concerns around how belay devices sit. I've never seen any issue in this arrangement and can't imagine it, you may just want to lock off slightly more to ...


4

I also agree that 8mm rope is pretty safe. I've done pretty close to straight vertical rappels up to 160ft on it while canyoneering (8mm rope is very common in canyoneering). I'm assuming you've gone on your trip by now, but for anyone else who might be curious, I'd like to address the idea of different descenders. The speed that you travel on the rope has ...


4

What you describe is called creep. According to this technical manual Creep is a material property frequently misunderstood and can be defined as the continued extension of a material when subjected to constant, long-term static loading. There are several types of dyneema and some of them have lower creep resistance. Balance community says Some of the ...


3

My Silvercore instructor said you should never store ammunition in an airtight or near-airtight safe, so that may be a contributing factor. If ammunition detonates in a fire or some other unintended scenario it can create a sudden and intense increase in pressure. If there is nowhere for that pressure to quickly vent your safe becomes a bomb and could ...


2

It's not necessary, but neither is using two non-lockers really. People usually use two carabiners because they will bend the rope less sharply, reducing friction when loaded (also reducing wear on the biners). This is very common in top roping, when the climber is expecting to be lowered. I suspect the person that setup the anchor in the picture wanted ...


2

Yes it will create CO. The question is if the CO level is dangerous when you open the door to tend to the cooker. Put it by the door and don't enter the shed while cooking.


1

My son slack lines (6' & 165lbs) on +15 M of 1". Using tree savers and each tree is about 6 to 8 in in diameter. He practices on a staked rigging over 6" rounds that lie on their side at each end of the run. Line is permanently mounted and staked into the ground. So when newbies or his mom gets a wild hair and tries it, they don't bust themselves up.


1

As I said in the comments, I believe my findings deserve an answer on their own. These matters are urgent and I'm a little troubled by what I've found. I've sent emails to three major rope manufacturers (Petzl, Beal, Mammut). Only Mammut cared to even write me an answer - which made me feel lonely and friendless. But anyway, I don't think there would be any ...


1

For my uses {natural fibers, normally) , having a wider contact surface, a gentler angle of ascent and descent as the rope slides is a factor. As stated above{ " bendng the rope less sharply "} A specialized aspect but important to my segment of the community.


1

Is this sufficient reason to conclude that the rope is indeed legitimate for aid/rescue use? Can it carry more than 2000 kg as specified by the NFPA 1983? No, but almost. If your statement was Is this sufficient reason to conclude that the rope WAS indeed legitimate for aid/rescue use? COULD it carry more than 2000 kg as specified by the NFPA 1983? The ...


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