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18

Generally, the board is your flotation device. Because you need to be able to dive, any additional flotation is likely to impede your ability to surf well. And you are absolutely right, that the tether means you usually have that flotation available to you. It does have some problems in certain scenarios, though, and the most common one we come up against ...


14

Regarding that tragedy: In that specific instance the victims were most likely not killed by water filling their lungs, but the dense foam. I don't think there is any current flotation device what would have saved them; as they needed to get above the foam itself. An alternative source of air (scuba tank or re-breathing device) or a very long snorkel, was ...


13

P.S.: I just noticed the question explicitly said indoors! My answer ended up being considerably more general than required... But well, the logic is the same as in case (a): Indoors the bolts are really close, so you should climb (or downclimb) to the nearest one and attach yourself to the fixed quickdraw using the harness belay loop. Both options you ...


9

The short answer is - you can't do an expedition. It takes lots of time, money and effort to organize an expedition and requires experience. Your best bet for visiting the Arctic (anywhere above the Arctic circle) would be to either fly or drive. You can fly to Barrow, Alaska, or you can fly into Norway, Sweden, Denmark or Russia and then drive to Arctic ...


7

I'm not 100% sure I'm understanding all the details, but here's my take on this. This seems like a really dangerous thing to do. A prusik is never guaranteed to hold. Sometimes a prusik needs to be tinkered with, dressed, etc., to make it hold. It should never be the only thing standing between you and the long ride. Your method of unweighting the anchor ...


6

Tow floats in bright colours are meant for this and most also carry a small amount of stuff (example that holds a water bottle; others have a dry compartment for your keys/phone/money) . Swimming with them takes a bit of getting used to. Hi-vis or very bright swimming caps also exist and cost very little. I recently bought one in bright orange for much ...


5

TLDR; Join yourself to the ends of the rope. My preference if the rope isn't on the ground is towards tieing an overhand on a bight on each side and clipping them both my belay loop. This strategy has two benefits major benefits. 1) The obvious is that when rappelling, you can't go past the end of the rope. This is true regardless of which type of ...


4

The cause of suspension trauma isn't fully known but is thought to be due to a lack of returning blood from the lower limbs. It is known that hanging immobile in a vertical position can lead to Suspension Trauma and this can happen surprisingly quickly as has happened when investigating the problem in France: Proposal of an Effective Algorithm to Manage ...


4

It's good that you're in the habit of putting knots in the end of your rope before you rappel. Failing to do that is an extremely common cause of accidents and deaths, because without the knots, you can pop off the end of the rope unexpectedly (or pop off of one strand, if they're uneven). Doing this with a Munter is not 100% guaranteed to work, because it ...


4

Your question asked "would it be safe". My answer is that yes, it would be (reasonably) safe. There are several roads like that near me where even school kids have to walk on the grass to get to their house from the bus stop as there is no footpath. The A413 has similar bus stops. One danger I find is twisting your ankle in the drainage dips that ...


4

Climbing chalk is almost always magnesium carbonate (MgCO3; source: ClimberNews). Liquid chalk is just a suspension of magnesium carbonate in a low vapour pressure liquid, something like acetone or ethanol, which will evaporate quickly and leave you with dry chalk on the hands (and significantly cooler hands too, much like hand sanitizers). Magnesium ...


4

From the Marine Department: please note the question is describing a power-driven heading towards a vessel at anchor but not a vessel under way and showing a port side light. In the picture, the upper white light is the forward anchor light whilst the lower white light is the anchor light at the stern of the vessel. The red light at the middle is an all ...


4

You might as well ask "How long is a piece of string?" - everything depends on the local geology. There are thousands of quarries that have been developed for cragging. But there must be a great many more that will never be suitable. Initial research The rock in your picture doesn't look very promising, to be frank, so you might want to do some ...


4

While your question is possibly considered off-topic for this site, you raise some interesting points. First of all: Please seek professional medical help. A lack of energy and not leaving your apartment indicate that you might have depression. While I am neither a qualified medical professional nor a qualified mental health professional, I strongly suggest ...


3

Buy a ticket to Grise Fjord. That's pretty arcticy. (No plants bigger than mosses, lots of rock.) Ok more seriously, if you want to go on your own, you need to acquire some skills first. Backpacking A: Get good at backpacking. B: Now start camping above timberline. C: Now start camping above timberline in winter. Skiing A: Learn to cross country ski. B: ...


3

If it is the length of your car, and you have tie down straps you should be able to do this perfectly safely. Ideally, get yourself canoe brackets to attach to your roof bars - these are curved to match your canoe and allow you to put more tension in the straps without damaging the canoe. It is recommended (especially when you have one longer than your ...


3

There are many references available on the internet regarding consumption of ash from untreated wood. The practice apparently dates into prehistory. However, as a few people have pointed out, the intent was not to use the ash as a food but as a food modifier. My own research shows four main uses: as a leavening agent, both in Europe and in North America ...


3

While berry120's answer is spot on, I would like to add the following: Overestimating yourself. A lot of times I see people swimming as fast as possible and as far as possible, either to show off of your swimming skills or just feeling invincible. Before entering any type of water consider your fitness level, e.g., maybe you're intoxicated. Getting lost. A ...


3

It is a good practice to backup a tope rope system, especially considering that There is only one anchor at the tope and no intermediate quickdraws Climbing far below, a visual check can be difficult Any sling rubbing on rock may be damaged pretty fast (mainly a problem on high-friction rock and around edges) Top rope climbing is often done by beginners ...


3

One locking carabiner might avoid some failure modes which apply to two quickdraws, but, as others have noted, it sacrifices redundancy. If you are concerned that two quickdraws might fail, you may make a couple "locking draws" specifically for anchors. Just attach small locking carabiners to a dogbone. That's what I have made for myself, mostly ...


3

Much depends on how frequently you use prusiks. Back in college when i was caving a lot, we used prusiks tied in 1/4" Plymouth Goldline using a 9/16" chunk of goldline as our ascent/descent line. I never had an issue, nor did anyone in our group. For those of you unfamiliar, Goldline was a very hard lay stranded rope. As stranded rope, it was ...


2

Keep means of putting the fire out if it starts spreading - water, a blanket, sturdy boots, whatever. If the fires is to be left unattended (e.g. everyone is sleeping around it) remove any fuel in a large radius from it. What follows is extremely controversial(!!) but I'll share it nevertheless. One way of doing that is to let the fire spread! This requires ...


2

Seems to me there is a trade-off between ease of paddling and ease of landing. If the nearest land is downwind and you head that way, you may have severe difficulties in landing among the breaking waves on the lee shore, especially if it is rocky. So I'm surprised that no-one has mentioned the use of a drogue, which used to be standard advice for landing ...


2

No. Energy absorbers are used when attached to a fixed point, which you won't have access to on a rope team. Additionally, the weight added to your base weight would further make this a bad pick to bring.


2

Focusing on the dangers of Swift water [Rivers and even small streams]: Many rivers and streams may look calm and inviting, especially in the hot summer, but can have hidden dangers. Foot Entrapment Any time you are in water moving at over 2 kts [about 3.7km/h] if you get a foot trapped [in a rock, branch or what ever] and the water is deeper that your ...


2

When roping up for the glacier there are two options available: The standard dynamic mountaineering rope. Static auxiliary ropes, e.g. rad line (which are sold for glacier use as well) There is an article in the German magazine bergundsteigen that compares both types of ropes. That concludes having a static element is not necessarily a problem as dynamic ...


2

Both .38 Special and .357 Magnum are calibers specified by SAAMI. If you have a gun with no indication of its caliber and no means of verifying its compliance with SAAMI specifications then don't expect it to safely fire SAAMI-spec cartridges. If a SAAMI cartridge appears to fit it and you want to work up a load then realize that you are engaging in proof ...


1

Go camping Go hiking Go hiking on multi-day trips Go hiking on longer multi-day trips Go hiking in cold conditions (snow on the ground. Using snowshoes or crampons) Go camping in cold conditions (in snow, with temperatures below freezing) Go hiking on multi-day trips in cold conditions Go ski-touring (have a guide with you) Go ski-touring on multi-day trips ...


1

If you wish to visit the Arctic but not organize and expedition yourself, you could consider a visit to Iqualuit, Nunavut. Iqualuit is usually described as being "in the Arctic" though it is not technically inside the Arctic Circle. Lots of Arctic winter activities are available, including snowmobiling, dogsledding, viewing the unique wildlife of ...


1

I cannot say with any certainty whether it is safe. As safe as can be walking along the side of a busy road. However, you might take a look at Iain Sinclair's long and history packed walk around London in his London Orbital. Iain Sinclair didn't get knocked down walking around the orbit of London.


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