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If you wish to visit the Arctic but not organize and expedition yourself, you could consider a visit to Iqualuit, Nunavut. Iqualuit is usually described as being "in the Arctic" though it is not technically inside the Arctic Circle. Lots of Arctic winter activities are available, including snowmobiling, dogsledding, viewing the unique wildlife of ...


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Objectively: no idea. Subjectively: Waste zero seconds. Make sure I have boots on. Run to the edge of the fire. Simultaneously shout some orders at some of the campers (if they allowed this, they are obviously incompetent, probably also frozen in panic). Furiously use mu hands to rip fuel (dry branches, pine branches, high grass, dry brush) and throwing it ...


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Buy a ticket to Grise Fjord. That's pretty arcticy. (No plants bigger than mosses, lots of rock.) Ok more seriously, if you want to go on your own, you need to acquire some skills first. A: Get good at backpacking. B: Now start camping above timberline. c: Now start camping above timberline in winter. A: Get a canoe. (So much of the arctic is wet, that a ...


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Keep means of putting the fire out if it starts spreading - water, a blanket, sturdy boots, whatever. If the fires is to be left unattended (e.g. everyone is sleeping around it) remove any fuel in a large radius from it. What follows is extremely controversial(!!) but I'll share it nevertheless. One way of doing that is to let the fire spread! This requires ...


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Climbing chalk is almost always magnesium carbonate (MgCO3; source: ClimberNews). Liquid chalk is just a suspension of magnesium carbonate in a low vapour pressure liquid, something like acetone or ethanol, which will evaporate quickly and leave you with dry chalk on the hands (and significantly cooler hands too, much like hand sanitizers). Magnesium ...


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The short answer is - you can't do an expedition. It takes lots of time, money and effort to organize an expedition and requires experience. Your best bet for visiting the Arctic (anywhere above the Arctic circle) would be to either fly or drive. You can fly to Barrow, Alaska, or you can fly into Norway, Sweden, Denmark or Russia and then drive to Arctic ...


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When roping up for the glacier there are two options available: The standard dynamic mountaineering rope. Static auxiliary ropes, e.g. rad line (which are sold for glacier use as well) There is an article in the German magazine bergundsteigen that compares both types of ropes. That concludes having a static element is not necessarily a problem as dynamic ...


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You're using a climbing rope, which is a dynamic rope, intentionally designed to be stretchy. (It's different from a static line.) So these properties are built into the rope already. As in any climbing belay, the amount of stretch in the rope is a compromise. Too much stretch increases the chances that the person falling will fall too far and hit something.


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No. Energy absorbers are used when attached to a fixed point, which you won't have access to on a rope team. Additionally, the weight added to your base weight would further make this a bad pick to bring.


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