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24

This item might be identical to a certified one, but the seller is clearly not aware of certifications, so you should assume it is not certified - in short: Do not use this carabiner for safety-relevant applications. The description on ebay says The ultimate tension: 25KN CE Certification "ultimate tension" is not a term used to describe ...


11

The main issue is that fraud and misrepresentation is rife in the chinese manufacturing sector. When I was working in outdoors retail, I saw a couple press releases where Petzl was facing counterfeiting from China. The copies were visually identical, down to the packaging and tags. Of course, when tested, they failed at significantly lower forces than what ...


9

Garmin GPSMap 182C and Simrad TP32 share the same language (NMEA 0183), but they do not have enough in common to talk about. The NMEA sentences that the 182C can transmit are GPRMC, GPGGA, GPGSA, GPGSV, GPGLL, GPBOD, GPRTE, GPWPL, PGRME, PGRMZ, and PSLIB. The first two letters of these identifiers are the Talker ID. GP stands for GPS receiver. PG and PS ...


8

If your concern is regarding broaching, then the two actions you take are: allow the head to come towards the wind, reducing the sideways force. This can be instant. if needed, slacken the main, depowering the sail. Unlike in a dinghy, where this can also be an instant move, in a yacht this is a bit slower. But unless the wind suddenly increases and you ...


5

As you mentioned, a vertical sail gives you more power, so where possible that should be your goal, but the drag caused when heeling is enough that for most catamarans you want to minimise it as much as possible. So aim to keep the windward hull just out of the water in calm seas, and a little higher in rough seas, in order to avoid a rough ride. If the ...


4

In short, yes. The rules in Section A (right of way) always apply, even when constrained by rules in Section B and C (which include room at marks). Boat A in your scenario is required to gybe at the mark. But let's look a little deeper at the scenario you describe, because it's a good question and it happens all the time. At the zone, overlapped A ...


3

These look like the Carabiners frequently used on Via Ferrata climbing kits. See for example these images on google. I am certain that you can find such carabiners from respectable brands with a known history of high quality gear that fulfils all the needed standards. They might be a little bit more expensive. In light of this I would say: If you have to ...


1

The best bet on a job like this is to stick a tape measure across it and see what you've got. While technically a "one design" hull a modern sunfish is a long way from a classic one and a wooden hull may have changed shape over the years. Styrofoam and the like comes in standard sizes so if you're doing the job yourself you'll be buying blocks and carving ...


1

Without specifics of when and exactly where in the Arctic your character plans to visit, this is a difficult question to answer. I see no risks (beyond the usual storms etc.) of sailing a boat of pretty much any description in the tropics and higher latitude ice-free waters. The Arctic covers a lot of territory on water and on land, some of which is ice ...


1

Generally, hold your course If there isn't a directional change and the wind doesn't exceed your vessel's ability to carry it under your current sail configuration, don't change a thing. Benefit from the puff. If the puff is sustained, you may be able to point slightly higher (if that's desirable because your objective is further to windward than your ...


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