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6

I had the same dilemma. I finally solved it, and it's awesome. I added an extra line to the cockpit which goes up the mast and connects to the two spars. When I haul that line, it raises the two spars to be parallel with the mast. The sail is completely out of the way, allowing you to anchor, fish, paddle...etc. The gooseneck ring needs a little help going ...


4

From the Marine Department: please note the question is describing a power-driven heading towards a vessel at anchor but not a vessel under way and showing a port side light. In the picture, the upper white light is the forward anchor light whilst the lower white light is the anchor light at the stern of the vessel. The red light at the middle is an all ...


3

I know this thread is old, but American Sail in Charleston, SC has them. I just bought one for my sunfish and it looks exactly the same and fits perfectly. They have either the screw in option or the pop-up option. My bailer had threads all the way down, so I got the screw-in one. I think it was $8. I picked up locally, but I believe the owner said that it ...


2

You are correct in the meaning of the term "Hull down" - meaning the hull was not visible from the perspective of the observer, but the sails or superstructure would have been. The home-bound ship would have appeared for some time, how long depends on how far away it was and its trajectory respective to the viewer. Given that the two boats appear ...


2

There are a many variables in any sailing passage estimation, such as wind direction strength which will vary over the course of the passage, tidal currents, and of course the chosen path through all that. There are some great tools that can help a lot with passage estimation. One free one is the OpenCPN weather routing plugin and there are other commercial ...


1

Almost certainly an Australian Scow Moth (see video stills here (youtube)). It was a pretty common boat in the 1980's or thereabouts, and I think (Wikipedia confirms) that the design was developed in Australia, but they were also common elsewhere. Moth class boats (now the common foiling dinghy) were and perhaps still are one of the boat classes with a lot ...


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