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3

To expand a bit on Toby Speight's answer, I want to follow up on this comment of yours: I agree fully - any time spent dealing with the particular implementations is a distraction from that objective. Yet paper based navigation spends time teaching how to work a protractor, how to measure angles, how to move parallel lines, how to calculate distances with a ...


6

The point of a navigation course is to teach people how to navigate, not how to use particular electronic devices. The principles of navigation are most easily taught using ordinary (paper) charts, without having to deal with the idiosyncrasies of particular devices - not to mention that it's easier to provide working charts for all the students if they are ...


4

The simple answer is that electronics fail, paper doesn't. You can read the paper map now, 6 hours from now, next week, next month, next year and it will be the same, but your devices will run out of power and be unusable in a short time-frame. Those points in your question all rely on the use of powered devices. The GPS on your tablet/phone/watch all have ...


1

Some set a Mediterranean Mooring, with one anchor out to sea and the other end of the boat tethered securely to the shore. The outward anchor keeps the boat away from the shore. It does prevent the boat from swinging with the weather. You can ensure the anchor is firmly affixed by increasing strain on the shore line, and then ease the rope to let it ride ...


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