17

This sounds like a great idea. Wild camping is permited under the Land Reform Act. Outdooraccess-scotland have put together a useful summary of how it relates to your access rights. Key points from which are; Does it mean I can camp anywhere? The main places where access rights do not apply are: houses and gardens, and non-residential ...


12

A list of changes to the Munro list and database of Munros and tops can be found at The Database of British and Irish hills. The list is maintained by the Scottish Mountaineering club (SMC) and is published in the SMC Journal. As far as I am aware, an update is only published when there is a change to the list. This is normally because of new survey data ...


12

There were two large steel water tanks on these foundations back in the 1960's. The tanks were rectangular. I used to play in these woods as a child and remember the tanks as being very rusty and military looking.


11

They appear to be part of a water tank. I've found a 1954 OS map that describes buildings at that location as "tanks" -- a term also applied on the same map to the water tower itself. Earlier maps don't show them The current OS map only shows the tower itself. Without a scale so making very rough guesses as to the diameter of the silver birch trees, they'...


10

There is not really a defined time in which midges are out and about, but usually they are seen from early June until October. Midge season heavily depends on the weather and a wet and cold June will mean less midgets or a later start to the season (as it happens this year). For a really good resource to know about midges is the Midge Forecast that gives ...


10

There are a large range nice routes you could do. Generally, I would say the further North you go the wilder/more remote it will be. Although if you go really far North, the options for Munros does decrease somewhat. For specific routes, the "official" Scottish coast to coast goes from Oban to St. Andrews, and has some options for remote bits and Munros ...


9

In short, just the name. Fjord is of Norse origin, loch of Gaelic. They are the same feature, formed when glaciers debouch into the sea. In both countries, you'll find varying scales, from a few hundred metres in width to several kilometres.


9

I can't speak for the Scottish winter and there definitely are differences to the Alps. But still I can give you an overview what is important to learn if you are going to do alpine summer tours in the Alps. The German Alpine Club (German: Deutscher Alpenverein, DAV) is the world's largest climbing association. The number of members is over one million. (...


8

Update on the sleeping side of things: I would use a relatively light sleeping bag, at most a two seasons one. It doesn't get that cold in Scotland, as the north Atlantic drift keeps our climate pretty mild all year. In terms of tents the key is to get one which can cope with winds as they can get pretty high. I wouldn't expect much over a force 4 for ...


7

Wild camping is allowed most places but due to car drivers leaving rubbish it's not allowed near the road at Loch Lomond in summer. Wishingwell Farmhouse campsite, Gartness and Drymen Farm campsite are both closed.(according to Google Maps) Shops at Balmaha, Loch Lomond. There are a few campsites besides Loch Lomond. Salachy Campsite is £5 which is the ...


7

I would agree with your research, I am certain that it is Fomes fomentarius - Hoof Fungus. Common in Scotland, and northern England, becoming progressively rarer as you travel south. Here are some that I photographed in the Great Glen, Scotland, when kayaking. Old ones... and a fresh one... Apparently it can be used by trout fishermen to dry their ...


7

If you want to cross from west to east you could research the venerable TGO Challenge walk, where hundreds each May walk their own coast-to-coast route. If you Google "TGO Challenge" you'll find a large number of blogs discussing routes in detail. As others have said, for maximum Munro bagging, you'd probably want to cross the Nevis range and the Cairngorms....


7

This isn't a complete answer, just an answer about the avalanche stuff, but it's too long to fit in a comment. Research shows that most avalanche training actually is not helpful in reducing people's chances of getting killed. It may even produce a negative effect on safety, because people get a false sense of competence. This is called the "expert halo." ...


7

Although I had originally thought Wikipedia had a good list, nivag pointed me in the direction of walkhighlands, and the Munro Society pages have more info. 1884 - 236 1891 - 282 or 283 1921 - 276 1974 - 279 1981 - 1984 - 1990 - 1997 - 284 2009 - 283 2012 - 282


6

Interesting. All of the answers address winter mountaineering, which I would regard as a separate subject. Winter skills for someone like me, living 4 hours from the mountains, would primarily be about how to prepare and cope with winter conditions, such as encountered by a hunter or hiker below timberline. Skills I would see as important: Hypothermia. ...


6

You're looking for balds. They are quite common in the southern Appalachians. The Roan Highlands along the border of Tennessee and North Carolina are particularly beautiful.


5

Nice walk. I have done it many times. Avalanche black spots are not really an issue on the Clova leg, Driesh, Mayar etc assuming you are taking Jock's Road but as you enter Callater section of Jock's road then you can get into some avalanche areas and the glen deepens. If you are taking the summit route then Avalanche issue only really apply on descent but ...


5

A fairly traditional and challenging route might start on the west coast at Inverie (shop, bunkhouse, remote pub!), which you must reach by sea on a passenger ferry from Mallaig. Head into Knoydart, tackling Munros Meall Buidhe, Sgurr na Ciche (bothy at Sourlies), the head over the Glen Dessary Munros and Sgurr Mor (bothy at Kinbreak), then on to Tomdoun (...


4

In northern California, after a rainy winter, much of the coast ranges are green and grassy, especially as you get further from the Pacific. But timing is very important. In the same region, Pt. Reyes Nat. Seashore looks similar and stays greener, although it's not a very big area.


4

One possibility is that Kielder Forest Park covers quite a lot of the Scotland England border. This should provide enough wilderness for wild camping and exploration off the beaten track but is also close enough to the well established Berwick to Gretna trail that you have the option of a more 'civilised' route for some sections if you want. A more ...


4

You can find grassy mountains in Colorado in the Guanella Pass, but you may find that the air is a bit thinner up there than it is in Scotland: Guanella Pass Another place you'll find mountains very similar to the the Scottish mountains is in Newfoundland Canada: Grand Codroy Valley


3

What you are specifically asking for is quite rare. That is because any place wet enough to have the kind of grass you want will have trees. There are vast grassy areas in the center of North America, but they are grassy because they are too dry for trees. They don't look so lush and green except perhaps a few weeks of the year. If they were so lush all ...


2

Chaga is parasitic and grows exclusively on living trees. The tree you have pictured appears to be rotting. Additionally, the mushrooms on that tree have a clear top and bottom. Although the coloration is similar, the picture above does not appear to be Chaga. I will, however, do some research to see if I can find what fungus in fact is growing.


2

We called them birch ears here. They are antiseptic. If you get cut, slice some and cover the wound with them. But they are not an eating mushroom.


2

Your travel to Scotland has probably passed, hope you had a good time. You are in the land of my favorite single malts: glendronach, oban, and glenmorangie - and therein lies my answer: Use ethyl alcohol in a pinch. That is, any high-proof potable spirit, generally anything 75% or more alcohol. Rum, for example, is often used for flambé, and any 151 ...


2

tricky, Rain - Scotland is pretty wet but May and June look to be your best bet. Light - Skye gets very long summer days which stretch out the 'golden hour', the summer solstice is in June Midges - apparently the first midges start hatching May-June, unfortunately the best time to go to avoid them is winter but this isn't the best time for your other ...


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