18

Was it better than no protection? Probably. Would I recommend it? No. The reason is this: DMM performed some tests where they anchored a sling to a carabiner and a load (80kg), and dropped the load from various heights. The results are a bit more nuanced, but the gist is that you should never fall onto a sling from at or above the anchor without any dynamic ...


9

The main issue you're going to encounter in this situation is rockfall. You don't want a situation where the person in front inadvertently kicks a rock loose, and the rock then hits the person behind. There are a bunch of possible techniques for dealing with this. You can limit the number of people climbing at one time, either by keeping the whole group ...


7

Mt. Whymper in Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, was first ascended by a party led by Edward Whymper in 1901. He also got first ascent at the beautiful Stanley Peak, which is named after the same Stanley as the Stanley Cup, and located just across the highway from Mt. Whymper.


6

It certainly isn't safe to use a sling or anything else which will not absorb shock in the event of a fall. Although you are probably not likely to have this sort of thing while scrambling, if you know are going to need to clip in to something for some reason, you could always take a tip from caving and use dynamic rope to make up what we call "cowstails". ...


6

Yes, that book is quite odd being aimed to beginners, so it should at least explicitly give some more information about that. That being said. If you want to do that, here's one way to (there are several). I did this in the past to help a party of less experienced people cross a slope full of unstable snow. First, get a lightweight rope. It does not have ...


4

Exposure is more a feeling that there is nothing below you in the event of a fall rather than a steepness. A trail that was level as it winds its way around a mountain but has a 1500 ft drop off on one side would be considered exposed, while Class 3 moves up a slope might not be depending on the person. Here is a picture of the narrows on the Long's peak ...


4

In the specific example of the video of your girlfriend, what you did seems to me like a perfectly reasonable way of dealing with that spot in the climb. When we talk about the bad consequences of taking a short fall on a static line (wrecking pro, snapping slings, injuries to the climber's pelvis), we're talking mainly about factor-2 falls on a vertical ...


3

Allthough I'm not a professional climber, I do regularly set up climbing obstacles and ziplines for children (scouting). When working up in the threes we mostly secure ourselves using slings so we can have two hands free to secure children or work on the rigging in general. I've taken a fall or two onto a sling (like you said up to 1 meter) and although ...


2

"Mountain Exposure" is a very broad term. Simply defined, it means you are exposing yourself to some risk of injury or death in the outdoors. Your level exposure while climbing is determined by how unprotected your climb is, which is summed up by how likely you are to sustain injury if you took a fall. On vertical climbs, the availability of anchors or ...


2

As a general rule of thumb: Never use static material only as protection while moving. Unless you anyway know what you do, I suggest you stick to that rule. There are several examples of fatal accidents involving static falls of very short distance into your binding, which then broke. Fall factors are not a factor to consider, as this compares length of ...


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