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36

Compasses are good equipment both spelunking and diving. Even the deepest cave you could go to is still near the earth's surface, geologically speaking. The earth's magnetic field is also essentially the same under water as above. If you are using a compass, what you need to be aware of is nearby magnets and large sources of iron. So if you were exploring ...


19

In my experience fitting people with Dive masks frame colours almost entirely come down to personal preference. As others have noted the actual silicone skirt of the masks, as well as the shape of the frame, will have a greater effect on what you can actually see. The most important thing to consider when getting a mask is the fit of the mask, even if you ...


13

In general, a black silicon mask will block out a little more light from close to your face. But for me, the effect is unnoticed unless I specifically look for it. Frame colors have never made any noticeable changes to the colors I'm seeing. I had a "low volume" mask that was to close to my face that pressed against my forehead and gave me a headache ...


12

I like a few features on my snorkels. A purge valve on the bottom near the mouthpiece. This allows for much easier purging since you don't have to push the water all the up the snorkel. A splash guard of some kind at the top. This greatly reduces the amount of water that can get in the tube. The ball & cage you mentioned works well. Replacing the ...


12

Your breathing rate is not affected, although experienced divers always try and breath slow, deep and continuous, to conserve air and keep airways open. The higher partial pressure of gasses does however have many other effect on the body, including gas narcosis, oxygen poisoning and increased risk of dysbarism. (Just on a side note the pressure in your ...


12

Yes, and no, it kind of depends on the local laws. So long as your equipment is covered by your manufacturer guarantee, and you will have to bear in mind as will all diving the local laws and legislations for equipment use in various countries / regions within a country, then it can use a higher FO2 than diving with Air. However your equipment must be: ...


12

It sounds like you need your very own wetsuit, preferably one that is made for cold waters. Not sure if you can be too warm in a wetsuit, honestly, I am not an expert in this, but you definitely need a warmer one than an average person in a particular water temperature. And if you rent a wetsuit from a diving school, you get whatever they have available. You ...


11

It is likely your cold water reg has diaphragam-like first stage which makes it particularly suited for cold water as well as contaminated water (which is not necessary the case for piston first stage). Usually, first stage designed for cold water have more surface area and mass in order to allow for heat absorption from water (insulation is NOT a good idea!)...


10

Firstly, it's very nice to see someone do the eye float thing :) But this should be done on an near empty cylinder (50 bar). Else you are perfectly weighted with about 2kg of air in your cylinder (single cylinger) and at the end of your dive you are 2kg lighter, and therefore might struggle with safety stops, ascent rates, etc. (2kg is just an estimate; ...


10

I shall have to call bullshit on this. I personally forgot to hook up my dry suit inflation hose many years ago and sank to 36m (4.6 atm) in cold UK waters. Where I suffered from serious love bites (dry suit squeeze). Luckily my buddy figured out what I was trying to imply and attached my hose for me. The cuffs would not cut you no matter the pressure as ...


10

An embolism in a medical context refers to any large moving mass or defect in the blood stream. An air embolism is an air bubble trapped in a blood vessel. When an air bubble travels along an artery, it moves through a system of blood vessels that gradually become narrower. At some point, the embolus will block a small artery and cut off the blood supply to ...


10

There are three things you should look at here, lung capacity, oxygen carrying capacity and bradycardia reflex. Lung Capacity When I was younger I suffered from asthma, and had a series of lung exercises to improve lung capacity. I can't remember them all now so I checked various sites. This one has some excellent tips, including: Rib stretch Abdominal ...


10

I have found the differences are mostly subconscious, and a matter of personal preference. Black blocks your widest of peripheral visions. You almost never look out that far, but your brain does process it. Clear silicone masks instead blur that part of your vision, permitting you to see rough outlines and colors. Some people find the black masks ...


9

Wet suit thickness is a very personal thing. I for instance dive in a 3mm shorty in 15C and higher and 3mm one piece for temperatures under 15C and above 6C Remember that you can also layer. So I would say a Dry Suit with thick under garment or a 7mm wet suit with a 3mm chicken vest underneath. Some nice thick gloves and hood and if you really cold then ...


9

Personally while scuba diving I have it on a monopod with a strap around my wrist. Not only does this prevent bubbles clouding your shot, it allows you to extend it beyond your normal reach. Ever tried getting close to a shoal of fish? Near damm impossible. With an extended monopod, moved very slowly, you can get really nice shots.


8

Ankle weights may only be a solution for beginner divers. The fact that your feet may be floating is not a real problem, the problem is when your whole leg floats as this causes a feet up head down profile which is bad. (Especially when diving in a dry suit) To get your feet down get yourself a pair of heavier (less buoyant) fins (jet fins tend to be ...


8

It really depends on locations so if you are traveling make a point to check. Your local club should be able to give you all the info for your area and abroad if they organize group dives in other countries, otherwise just contact the destination dive club (and keep in mind that in some places the situation might change from one year to the other). As a ...


8

You do not want a 6-7mm wetsuit for spring canoeing, you'd have trouble moving freely in it, and you would overheat very easily. They use 7mm wetsuits for arctic diving. I surf and swim in glacier lakes using a 4-3mm wetsuit (4mm torso, 3mm arms and legs). For paddling especially you want the extra mobility. Paddling with 3mm neoprene on your arms is ...


8

How about leaving the PADI fold and moving on to other styles of diving, for example technical diving: where you can learn to do much longer dives with decompression (an hour at 30 metres?); where you can use alternative gases - Trimix - and dive deeper; where you can investigate the amazing underworld in caves/caverns/mines; diving with CCR; diving ...


8

I have no experience in this but It seems logical that you can drink while underwater. This thread seems to confirm that. Most importantly you should use a soft pouch as a container with a straw. This keeps pressure equal and prevents seawater from flowing in.


8

The amount of nitrogen in your body is only part of it. Nitrogen is absorbed quicker by your lipid, or fat, tissues at greater depths. The cut off point for a non-deep PADI qualified diver is 30m. There is a course to go deeper, down to 40m, as the absorption rate increases. This can cause various effects including nitrogen narcosis. I will add nitrogen ...


8

Straight up the Answer is almost certainly NO, since unless there is some way of restricting access to a site, any person can put on dive gear and go dive without any experience/training. I am not aware of any countries with laws prohibiting scuba diving in any form except for reward (commercial gain). The more acceptable answer is, whenever you enter any ...


7

Diving is first and foremost a PRACTICAL skill so the best way to practise is to do it. Yes you can read through the books to refresh your theory, but this will not refresh your ability to dive. But it can be helpful in reminding you about small things you may have forgotten. Practising hand signals can be good, but these we always confirm before dives as ...


7

There are many discussions going on around this. Just remember the decompression models are theoretical mathematical models, backed by practical dives/research. We implement some rules for safety, like slower ascend rates, deep stops, safety stops, deep dives first, etc. Remember many factors determine your ability to on and off gas from day to day. The ...


7

Reverse profile dives are not taboo as they were once thought: Deepest Dive First? Not Anymore Plan your dives and dive your plans. Going shallow and then deep should be fine as long as you don't push the limits. That said, there are times when deep first can be better logistically. For example I can do a deep dive on double 80s and use half my gas with ...


7

A good estimation is to deduct 5 degrees Celsius from surface temperature to get temperature at 20m - 30m depth. (This is based on my experience over thousands of dives, but most of the diving is in temperate and colder waters) There are several factors that can influence the difference between the temperature at surface and at depth. I would say contact ...


7

Here is a quick reference : CMAS PADI Equivalent CMAS 1 Star Diver Open Water Diver CMAS 2 Star Diver Rescue Diver (with verification of Night and Navigation dive) CMAS 3 Star Diver Divemaster or IDC Candidate CMAS 1 Star Instructor IDC Candidate CMAS 2 Star Instructor IDC Candidate ...


7

I'm only a beginner, but... I found in my very first pool dive that losing my peripheral vision with a black silicone skirt on the mask gave me immediate and profound claustrophobia. I spent the whole dive stressed about what was around me. I went out and bought my own mask with a clear silicone skirt. Problem solved. From a practical PoV I'm well aware ...


7

So researching on the net a little bit shows some slightly different certifications than I had thought, however the specialist diver is something you get every 2 specialisations with SSI and the course material tells you you get it before Advanced Open Water, so there may not be a PADI equivalent. I cannot either find an equivalent PADI certification to ...


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