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2

I totally agree with both @Ben Crowell and @Jon Custer in their comments to your question. The answers to this a easily searchable and require some very simple maths to work out. As a quick google search will tell you, sea water contains about 380 mg of potassium per litre of water. A typical daily requirement for a typical sedentary person (i.e. not active ...


3

Your question mixes two things together which are actually very different: How efficient ... in terms of effort/time required to cover distance Boats of all kinds are really efficient in terms of what you call "effort". You can move a lot of weight with them, while expending little energy. Speed actually reduces that efficiency, that's why the ...


41

The canoe has three huge advantages: it works in the absence of paths or trails it can carry enormous loads adding paddlers to it makes it go faster The first is probably the most important. I've paddled a distance while someone else walks (for various reasons) and if the person is walking across lawn, it's about the same, and if I'm into the wind I'm ...


10

The most efficient boat design is fairly straightforward. Rowing is more efficient than paddling, because anchoring the oar to the hull allows oars to be longer than paddles and longer levers are more efficient. Facing backwards allows you to use the muscles in your legs, which is also more efficient. None of the gains are likely to convince white water ...


7

The typical speed of a canoe on calm water is at least the same as a person walking along a smooth path, about 3 mph. If you are walking along a road, then a bicycle or a car would be the most efficient means. A more meaningful comparison would be between a canoe on a river and hiking through the bush. For the Voyageurs, the canoe was by far the best choice. ...


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