14

First, see my comment above. Get some professional instruction. Seriously. To answer your points directly: Build a snow anchor, then transfer the load to your anchor. Holding your partner's weight for the entire duration of a self rescue would be a bad idea. Building an anchor is independent of what your partner is doing. Always build an anchor. On ...


12

Climbing Self Rescue: Improvising Solutions for Serious Situations This book presents self-rescue techniques in the first section. The latter half contains several dozen "what would you do" scenarios, allowing you to test what you've learned. It gives one or more solutions to each scenario, as well as highlighting things to watch out for. Most importantly, ...


12

In case of ascending on a rockface it does not really matter which way round you use it. I put the chest-prusik above the foot-prusik, but this is only because of personal taste. By adjusting the lengths of the slings you can do huge steps in this configuration too. Even though this may not be desirable, as shorter steps can be more efficient (also up to ...


10

To start with, each situation will be different. E.g. if you have an overhang and your partner is hanging freely in space, you may need to handle things a bit differently. Lowering an unconscious leader is also dangerous, as lower-angle terrain can exacerbate their injuries, and getting them caught on an unseen ledge could introduce slack. Also, if you ...


10

I am going to approach this question differently. Since the question is marked with the rock-climbing tag the use of a 7.5mm Technora escape rope that AM_Hawk's answer focuses on seems unlikely. Also, the method by which he arrives at a minimum Prusik cord size doesn't address certain issues. Cord diameter All else being equal a smaller cord for a ...


9

What do you do in this situation? Just keep moving, trying to basically swim through the ice, while breaking it hoping to reach thicker ice or the shore? More or less, yes with two caveats. If someone else is in the process of attempting a rescue (e.g., their first rope toss came up short or the boat is on the way) you might be better off making sure you ...


8

This is simply a Clove Hitch on the belay loop. It could be quite effective to use instead of a belay plate if you can only use one hand because it doesn't require you to hold either side of the rope - it simply tightens and locks up in the event of a fall. The biner is placed where it is to make it easier to loosen the rope with one hand in-case it locks ...


8

EDIT: When the question was posed I misinterpreted it to be asking the diameter of the "Climbing Rope" not "Cord" However my answer for Cord diameter is also listed as "2mm less than cord diameter and not less than 5mm" I would not go any lower than 7.5mm*, it is a common diameter used by rescue technicians.There are several reasons why I recommend 7.5mm, ...


7

Although there is information on various websites and forums on self-rescue techniques, you really cannot learn enough to cope with a situation just by reading about it without a LOT of hands-on practice. To start with try and get help as much as you can - for instance shouting for help if there are any other climbers nearby. Get them to phone immediately ...


7

I always ascend the other way around (foot-prusik above the chest prusik). This allows for a bigger movement with your foot and hence a bigger climb during your ascend. Note: I actually use bloqueurs, but basically the methods should remain the same.


7

As many other posters pointed out, drinking alcohol to prevent dehydration is counter-productive. However, there are other uses for a bottle of high-proof booze in a survival situation. When its proof is high enough to be flammable, it can be used as a fire accelerant or even as fuel for cooking It can be used to disinfect open wounds to avoid a nasty ...


4

If you are confident and not out of breath, reattach the skirt before the roll after upside-down re-entry (re-entry and roll mentioned above). It takes a lot of effort and maybe a nose plug. But if you can do it, it saves a lot of pumping effort.


4

Alcohol is poisonous, it saturates your blood with sugars and will dehydrate you faster as your body sucks your own cells dry in need of water to dilute those sugars. If you're in a survival situation, and all that you have left is the heavy bottle of alcohol that you somehow forgot about and didn't notice weighing down your bag, the best thing to do with it ...


4

If all I had was some liquor, I would not be drinking that. Drinking alcohol causes dehydration, so while you might feel some very very temporary relief from having liquid in your throat, it's going to hurt you in terms of dehydration overall. Additionally, as you said, alcohol leads to poor judgement and reduced decision making skills. That's only going to ...


3

He was demonstrating how to tie a Clove Hitch one-handed for setting up a belay when one arm is broken. The karabiner in the knot is to help release and untie it afterwards.


1

Alcohol is a high flammable liquid so better answer is to spread it all over the woods (if there's any) and make a spark, the help will reach you faster than you thought. ;)


1

One more piece of gear worth considering, if you plan to do solo trips or group trips in conditions that might separate the group, are inflatable sponsons—-long narrow inflatable tubes stowed compactly alongside the cockpit rim, secured in advance to the hull or rigging. You can inflate these in an emergency from inside or alongside your boat, making the ...


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