Hot answers tagged

21

The concept of wind chill does not apply in this situation. Wind chill talks about perceived temperature due to additional heat loss due to convection. Meaning without wind, the "heated" air will stay around you much longer, thus "insulating" you a bit, while in high wind any heated air will get swept away immediately. In a properly built snow cave you have ...


17

My experience comes mostly from backpacking in remote areas without already made tent sites. I have found that a hammock is better for me and my style of camping. If you are mostly a car-camper and are used to pulling your SUV up to a pad site, YMMV. Following are the reasons I believe a Hammock is better than a Tent. Weight - In all but the coldest ...


14

There are a few different styles of shelters that come to mind with differing levels of difficulty. A lot of it depends on if they will be making it to survive the night, or to survive for an exponential amount of time until possible rescue. A snow cave is one option, however it may be difficult with the tools you have mentioned. Although I think that it ...


13

I did it for three nights. First night was more like intermittent napping, but my girlfriend slept great. The second night I woke up twice. The third night I was more concerned with the flapping sound from my rain fly, the creaking trees and the sideways wind. After minimizing the flapping sound I slept as fine as I would have in those conditions on my own. ...


12

What kind of shelter you can build will depend on what is around you at the time. If you are in a forest or woodland you will obviously have more to utilise than in a desert or moorland, but from my own experiences I've built shelters in British deciduous and coniferous woodlands. During Girl Guides (bit like Scouts) and school based Team Building weeks we ...


12

I'm somewhat of a claustrophobic sleeper when it comes to quinzhees, so I'm very particular about my ventilation. How much ventilation you need is proportionate to the size of your quinzhee, and how many people are sleeping in it. Larger quinzhees need less ventilation than smaller ones, and more people obviously require more ventilation than fewer people. ...


11

Large tents are generally not an issue in campgrounds, although finding a large enough flat piece of ground may be. The more likely problem you'll face is maximum stay restrictions. Be sure that you check the requirements before making your decision, because having to move your camp every couple of weeks will dramatically change the setup you want. I ...


10

That lean-to in the link looks like it would shelter from all but the most wind driven rain. If you pack a cheap vinyl poncho that should take care of most situations. They are light enough that you can pack a second. What is the temperature rating on your sleeping bag? 15F/-10C will probably be more than warm enough. If you are carrying a summer bag, you ...


9

IMO you totally don't need a tent. Plenty of people, including me, prefer to sleep out under the stars even if there's no hut. It can be difficult to sleep with a wind blowing across one's face, but that won't be happening inside the hut. It's also off the ground, so you won't be losing heat into the dirt. Yes, the temperature inside will be the same as ...


9

Do they work? Yes...but you need to know why... The Key, Like Most Things, Is Understanding How They Work The material on “space” blankets was actually developed by NASA for the purpose of use in space to protect astronauts from solar heat, and they’re very good at it. In a wilderness setting, they do have limitations with must be mitigated though. They ...


8

I own a Grand Trunk Double hammock (10.5' long x 6.5' wide), I'm 5'10" 160 lbs, my wife is 5'4" and not overweight (I'm not writing the # ;) ). Slept 2 nights so far with her in the hammock. We each had our own sleeping bag. We were definitely squished together tightly. We couldn't roll over. That said, we both slept okay. It is definitely less comfortable ...


8

Not as real as the danger of death by exposure and hypothermia while outside the igloo. Your risk of asphyxiation in a snow shelter depends largely on its size, and the number of people inside it. People have been living in igloos for hundreds if not thousands of years, and not just for one night or two at a time, but as permanent dwellings also. Igloos ...


7

I would at least look into multiple smaller tents instead of a single large tent to handle all. Other than the cat thing (I really don't know how to respond to that), I'd probably have one tent for sleeping, and another for the "office". A third thing that isn't really a full tent but more just a canopy for cooking, eating, and other things that can be ...


7

I think the answer is as simple as: If you own a mid-layer wear it to the store when you purchase the shell. If you own a shell wear it to the store when you purchase your mid-layer. If you don't own either purchase them together to ensure best fit. There are several different layering systems find what works for you and try everything on in store. If ...


7

No, there won't be anything electrical. A front country kitchen will usually contain: a wood burning stove 2-4 picnic tables food storage lockers a bear proof trash container (nearby) Depending on the park there may be a woodpile next to the kitchen. Food storage lockers are also dependant on the park and the wild life situation (e.g. bears, racoons), ...


7

My husband and I backpacked around Europe for 3 months, sleeping in a hammock almost the entire time. At first we slept side by side with our heads on the same end. It was horrible. So we switched to having our heads on opposite ends, with each person slanted, forming a tight X. It was comfortable, and we are planning on exchanging our bed for a hammock.


7

Lean-tos are hard-sided structures, and are not really meant to be set up quickly. As a hiker and scouter, I and my group carry tarps all the time, and expect rain to greet us wherever we decide to set up camp. As such, tarps need to be one of the most accessible things you have. If I were caught in a downpour, my immediate reaction to get/stay dry as ...


7

The danger is not only suffocation due to lack of oxygen, but also poisoning due to too much carbon dioxide in the air. Normal air has 21% oxygen; humans will safely survive down to ~15%. Maybe 10% oxygen is barely survivable for a few hours. Mountaineers might have an advantage here, they regularly survive Everest, which has ⅓ of the oxygen at sea level ...


7

To connect two poles (of roughly equivalent size) in a square angle you should be using the square lashing, as you already suggested. Here is a good animated tutorial showing how to tie it: https://www.animatedknots.com/square-lashing-knot Note the steps no. 13-16 from the above tutorial, where you basically "circle" your lashing between the two poles on ...


6

One of the fun things about tarping is that every tarp setup is different. For that reason it's hard to make generalizations. Also, it may make a difference what environment you're in. In some places, you're virtually guaranteed a rainstorm every evening. In others (the Sierra in summer), you basically don't expect rain, and the tarp is a piece of emergency ...


6

You could talk to the guys at Panther Primitives. They make high-quality canvas wall tents for the historical reenactment community, and they spend a sizeable amount of time camping in them. However, I really think your answer is a yurt (or ger). They are round, so that helps with high winds. They are big enough to walk around in. They have accordian-...


6

You can improvise a tent-like shelter with a sturdy rain poncho and some cord. Tie one corner to a tree a 18" (~1/2 meter) off the ground, then spread the poncho in a diamond shape. Pull the corner opposite the tree somewhat taut and tie it to a peg or stick. Spread the other two corners and secure them likewise. For the hood, tie it off so rain can't ...


6

Tried this for two separate trips with my boyfriend. We each have a double nest of our own. They are great because with so much extra fabric you can wrap it around yourself or even sit with your backpack. Both nights were AWFUL. There is no angle that won't end up with some kind of pressure for you both. Both nights I ended up sleeping on top of him. This ...


6

The main reason that I found is for cutting a cornice, sometimes referred to as the bombs of the backcountry. Extending the handle allows one to cut it without being too close, and as for why one would want to cut a cornice, The advantage of cutting cornices is that it allows backcountry skiers or mountaineers to test a slope without getting onto the ...


6

I have spent many nights sleeping in tents, tarps, and under the stars. Tents are definitely your warmest option, and can be up to 10 degrees warmer than the outside - if you're using a rainfly. Just using the mesh tent body will even increase the temperature by a few degrees, but won't protect from any weather except mild wind. Tarps can certainly ...


6

A tarp is significantly warmer. On a clear night the surface of your bag is radiating into interstellar space. Not much radiation back. With a tarp, you have one absorb/reradiate layer which will essentially cut this in half. If you look on a frosty morning, you will see that there is often no frost under a tree. Due to the tree intercepting radiation ...


5

Think of the time you can invest and rather you'd want to invest into making one of these, as it takes quite an effort and time to make one that you'll be wanting to be inside of. If you are in a hurry, consider making a trench instead of a snow cave. As a trench can be made far more quicker and takes less efforts, and can be relied upon in case of emergency ...


5

Early October should not be overly busy. South bounders (SOBO) starts around July and will be out of Main by that time. North bounders (NOBO) must finish before October 15 and many of them will already have completed the trail. For SOBOs, June-July is the peak season for Maine. There are less than 500 thru hikers per season in this direction. For NOBOs, July-...


5

A hut like this should at least be dry and reasonably sheltered so you might get draughts but not direct driving winds. This means that you can afford to focus on warmth rather than more general shelter if you are confident that you can reach a hut every night. In this sort of context down sleeping bags are attractive as they offer excellent warmth and ...


5

Neglecting the wind (advection) the tarp shouldn't make any noticeable difference. I doubt you could measure even one Kelvin difference. Even a tent isn't providing a lot of warmth during night but as long as you stay active in the tent (by moving and/or cooking) you will notice an increase in the temperature. During night you are passive and most of the ...


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