10

In theory you could hunt Mule Deer with .223. I had friends who hunt boar with .223 and mule dear aren't really any tougher than a boar. That being said, smaller caliber equals less expansion and kinetic force. That means you have to be more precise. If you are new to hunting, I would go with the classic .30-06. Good range, good ballistics, great range ...


9

Often times it makes sense to ask the locals by asking at gun shops or outdoor gear shops like for example Sportsman's Warehouse or Cabela's. The other good resource would be the managers of public land in the area, sometimes the BLM or Forest service will have designated areas and sometimes areas will be closed to shooting during certain times of the year....


9

You should clean all guns at the end of every session of use for a few reasons. I am assuming .22 or .17 cal since you said rimfire. These are the most common rimfire calibers. to prevent residue buildup which can be dangerous if a bullet gets lodged in the barrel, and even more dangerous if you somehow don't notice and shoot another round which I suppose ...


9

.30-06 is a much more powerful round with flatter trajectory and greater impact energy. That said, for shots on mid-sized game (like deer) at ranges out to 300 yards, it makes no difference which of those two rounds you use, only that your shot is accurate. Both rounds are plenty powerful enough for those common hunting scenarios. For long range shots or ...


8

You shouldn't shoot steel shot through a shotgun barrel that isn't designed for it. Steel shot builds higher pressure than lead and could seriously damage both your gun and your face if the manufacturer didn't design for it. This kind of warning will be written on any box of steel shot ammunition you buy. You say "by law I can only fire steel shot", but is ...


8

According to article Benefits of Copper, Orange, Yellow And Brown Lens Tints and from my own experience, but with cycling solar glasses: Copper, orange, yellow/amber and brown lens tints make an environment appear brighter and are commonly used in low-light conditions. These lens tints significantly block blue light and enhance contrast and depth ...


6

If you can't break it free with pliers where you've added some kind of protection against the teeth (rags, etc) gouging the bullet, you are left with either a collet puller (top) that goes in your press or hammer style puller (bottom).


6

.30 cal is about where big game hunting starts. You could get away with .223 with smaller white tail deer, but you'll increase how often you need to track your deer and that's less humane. For mule deer, I would stick to .30 or higher. I prefer Springfield 30-06, but that's just my preference. You could really use any .30 or higher.


6

According to: Competition Shooting 101: CMP/NRA High Power By Nick Leghorn on April 21, 2011 Shooting Jacket – This is another tool for keeping you steady. While standing or sitting, having an extremely tight jacket to hold you up can be a real help. It also helps keep the sling in proper position during prone. It’s a little spend-y, but worth the ...


6

I clean all of my firearms, including rimfires, on about the same schedule: A light cleaning/oiling. I swab the inside of the barrel with an oil-dampened (just oil) cloth AND very lightly coat all easily-accessible metal surfaces: After each use. After exposure to the elements. (I was on a backcountry hunting trip in central Idaho once where the fog, rain ...


5

Two options are available to you depending on what style rifle, scope, and rings you are using: Loosen the scope rings and slide the scope along the scope tube rearward (towards the stock) Move the entire scope and mounting rings rearward. This would be the preferable option if your rifle has a picatinny style mounting rail. Some other items to remember: ...


5

The general rule of thumb I've always read/heard is does the trigger hand placement naturally allow the finger to reach the trigger if you were to set the butt on the inside of the elbow - stick your arm out to your side, bend it so your forearm is pointing up, set shotgun/rifle on your arm out by your elbow. Does your hand naturally reach the grip so you ...


5

Assuming both the 40 and 60 grain are actually subsonic (the projectile does not break the sound barrier) and both have similar muzzle velocities, you should expect the 60 grain to be louder. It takes more energy (gun powder) to get the heavier 60 grain projectile to the same speed as the lighter 40 grain projectile.


4

So, is "quality shooting" an official term to describe a bunch of disciplines (like traditional archery etc.)? No, de facto, I'd never met such interpretation even unofficially. Is it really true that we call these kinds of archery "quality shooting" or did they want to make a joke (mock compound and crossbow people)? It looks like a strange ...


4

My deer rifle is a .270. That is a smaller caliber than what either of the two current answers recommend. My father frequently carries only his .44 magnum bear pistol when hunting bear and/or deer. With my .270 I don't consider shooting bears, and he only considers relatively close shots. In my opinion there are many firearms that can do the job effectively ...


4

So the question remains.......what is the difference. Well in my experience there is very little difference when we are talking about bullet weights up to 180gr. A friend of mine has a 30-06 and I use a .308 Win. We put our money together to purchase heads (Nosler custom competition 155gr HPBT) to reload ourselves and we noticed something very ...


4

You could visit your local police department and ask if they can recommend a public range. This is somewhat more likely to get you a range that caters to handguns than rifles, but it's worth a try.


4

If chambering a round deforms or otherwise mars the bullet, it may have a decrease in accuracy. Even a damaged case can change the point of impact for very long range shots. Also, accuracy is a relative term. Anything that varies the variables from those present when you shoot from your benchrest conditions will change the point of impact and therefore "...


4

What the 2-stage gains you is having a perceived lighter trigger weight even though it is the same overall. I forget the technical term for it, but the first stage takes up the "slack" or travel in the trigger up to where you reach the second stage. From there it acts just like a single stage. So the potential benefit is if you can set the first stage high ...


4

Despite what the extremely smart and dedicate (and if I say so myself good looking) individuals in the US military say is the maximum safe exposure, more noise reduction is always better to the extent that it does not hamper situational awareness or impact operational readiness. As a recreational shooter, this means more is better. The big issue is that in ...


4

As in the article linked by @topshot, it is because of two factors, Sound is being conducted by your bones around the hearing the protection. They don't act as two separate devices. The principal reason is the bone-conduction (BC) limits to attenuation, which are also illustrated in Figure 1. The BC limits represent sound that effectively flanks or ...


3

I have had good luck taking a shotgun in hand and then picking out a spot at a typical bird type height and distance, often where the ceiling meets the wall in a corner. Then I stare at the spot, and mount the shotgun. Without moving, I shift my focus to the bead and see how close the bead is to my intended target. You can do a similar process by closing ...


3

It turns out that repeatedly chambering a round should be avoided, not because of accuracy, but for safety reasons. When a bullet is repeatedly chambered, it can cause what is called set-back where the bullet is pushed further and further into the brass case. This can cause higher pressures than the gun is designed for and that is dangerous. The type of ...


3

I have owned, reloaded, and hunted with both 30 caliber rounds and have to say that they are both very effective and capable for almost all hunting applications. The first comparison I can offer is felt recoil, the 30-06 is a little bit more than 308 in this area. So For new shooters still getting use to shooting with a scoped rifle 308 will probably be ...


3

I've only been shooting traditional muzzleloader for the last few years, so I'm not an old hand with them. But I would suspect that you'd begin to see cracks around the top edge. I frequently remove mine and make sure it's clean inside and out. Honestly, I've never heard of that level of failure on one. I hunt and shoot with guys that have used them for ...


3

In addition, it isn't only the gun itself you should worry about with steel shot. For instance, my turkey plug is only for lead shot. I believe my shotgun can take either, but the specific plug I am using for turkey specifically said no steel. For additional maintenance, I don't think there would be as much extra lead residue in your barrel (obviously), ...


3

It is important to match your intended shooting height to the bipod that you select. Additionally, the longer that you are shooting the more stable the attachment between the rifle and the bipod need to be. Additionally to properly load up the bipod you want feet that will grip the surface that you are on instead of allowing the bipod to walk forward.


3

For long range shooting, you have to aim above the target in order to hit it. For example, a 308 will have dropped 340 inches at 1,000 yards. Source Instead of aiming above, it is possible to dial a scope in so that you can hold the crosshairs directly on the target. However, scopes have a limited amount of movement. A 20 MOA (or 30 or 40) rail will point ...


3

A bore sight will get you close, but it's not perfect and you will want to shoot real bullets to test your aim afterwards. If you bore sight it at 25 yards it should be on paper at 100 yards and you can make small adjustments from there. As for calculating how much it will drop over distance/ be pushed by the wind there are ballistic calculators or phone ...


2

In school I shot competitive rimfire with valuable Anschutz .22LR rifles. Our team didn't clean our rifles until the end of the season, even though we fired thousands of rounds through them during practice and competition. The problem with cleaning is that it takes barrels some number of "fouling" shots before they reach some equilibrium where peak shot-to-...


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