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27

As a New Englander who hikes a lot, I’d say that the sight of any good signage is so startling and unexpected that the appearance of the material should be a distant secondary concern to the signs’ utility. There are a few things to consider that you haven’t mentioned: How long will you be on this trail committee? Are you likely to have other board ...


26

What you're asking to do is impossible to accomplish. The signs will never, "move outward with the tree as it grows". Trees don't grow like that. The reason trees have rings is because they grow layer-by-layer each season. If you tie a thread around a tree, the tree will not grow and break the thread, it will grow around it. Similarly, you're not going to ...


20

Switzerland has a nationally consistent policy for hiking signs with Swiss precision (for example and inspiration, see this impressive 64 page guide on signage), as required by law. This applies whether in the high mountains, on easy forest trails, or (usually short segments) on rural roads. You might find a sign indicating it's 5 hours and 55 minutes ...


14

Given that trees don't push outward, one option is to use lag bolts, and once a year two go around and turn them out a little bit so they are never engulfed in the growth. The amount of turning you'll need to do and the frequency will depend on the speed of growth and how secure you need the sign. If you can leave a half-inch out of the tree and have the ...


12

My only experience with this is as a hiker, and I can only give my own opinion. But first: Examples In the Columbia River Gorge there are a few different types of signage used. Major road-side signs: Trailhead signs: Junction signs: Masonry signs: Unlike the stone sign WedaPashi showed the lettering on these masonry signs is quite fine, so they are ...


11

How about if you just take photos and post them on mountainproject or summitpost, along with verbal descriptions and UTM coordinates? Physically marking the starts of the routes is not compatible with a leave-no-trace ethic.


11

Knowing why distance was included or omitted in any particular instance requires asking the people that decided on that particular sign. In other words, in the general case, you don't know why. I've been involved with specifying trail signs. One reason I can imagine that distances were omitted is because they weren't known with enough confidence to put ...


11

In other contexts a knife and fork icon (or fork and spoon e.g. on UK motorway service signs) is widely used, but I'm a little reluctant to propose it here, as it could equally mean cutlery, or more generally (and perhaps more plausibly) food preparation equipment. It might be appropriate to combine with a coffee cup (hot drink) icon, and/or a raindrop/tap ...


10

You are probably finished with this project by now, but I'll weigh in with our experience for others searching for this answer down the road. We were wondering the same thing about how to attach horticultural signs to trees a couple of years ago. We manufacture interactive plant tags for trees and other plants and many of our users attach our larger signs ...


10

I have been researching sign construction various ways, with asking a question here being one of them. I was just forwarded a email from Adobe Signs, replying to questions from the Groton Conservation Trust (our local private land trust). Adobe Signs is the regular sign maker used by the Trust for their roadside signs. These signs are dark-stained wood ...


10

I appreciate everyone's help and opinions here, and want to report what we ended up doing. We (the Town of Groton Massachusetts Trails Committee) looked at a variety of options. At first the plan was just to do what everyone else was doing in the backcountry (where you can't drive a motorized vehicle to), which is overwhelmingly plain routed wood. After ...


10

Coming from a heavy ranching area the method used for properly attaching fences to trees is to add a board in between. The board provides enough surface area and strength that instead of the tree growing around the nail it pushes it out .


8

IMHO, I would like to suggest using the ones made with plastic, probably Custom Engraved Signs. I believe its about personal opinion up to certain extent. The people who are suggesting you to use wooden trail signs are right about the fact that we should never put on something in nature there, which is made up of plastic in particular. But on the contrary I'...


7

Muir Valley is a privately owned area, so presumably the coins are acceptable to the retired couple that owns it. Don't know about Ontario, but in the US (the Red River Gorge aside) most climbing areas are owned by federal or state governments who may likely have regulations against physically marking the starts of the routes (this is in addition to any ...


6

The answer has already been picked, but I want to throw in my 2 cents as well. While I'm not against plastic, the sample you show turns me off. Looks too urban. If they make one that looks more natural, then I'm all for it. Also, I think signage should be minimal. Trailheads and big intersections. Along the trail I like painted blazes. When it comes to ...


6

The right answer will depend vastly on how fast the trees grow. For example Aspen trees grow extremely fast in certain climates while subalpine fir are pretty slow growing in almost every case. Fortunately, there is an extremely easy way for you to find out the growth rate of your trees. Cut one down, count 10 years worth of rings and measure the distance ...


5

In Europe, especially in the mountains, trail signs usually have time instead of distance, even though the distance is probably accurately known. The mileage isn't really the most important thing as altitude change and terrain are much more important; 3 miles on a good track along a valley floor might take less than an hour, but 3 miles on a narrow, ...


4

In short no for hiking trails, the closest one will ever get to a standard difficulty rating are the first 3 classes of the Yosemite Decimal System. Beyond that, there are many different scales of measuring difficulty, Shenandoah's Hiking Difficulty is determined by a numerical rating using the following formula: Elevation Gain x 2 x distance (in ...


3

Punch a hole in each corner of the sign. Run a length of 1/8" elastic around the tree and the top 2 holes, and again around the tree and the bottom 2 holes. Tie a rolling hitch behind the tree for each cord, leaving plenty of extra length. Loosen the cord as needed.


3

Why to put nails in the trees when you can paint the trail signs on them? I know, I know, it needs some updating each 2-3 years, but plastic and aluminium colors may also fade. I would consider one information board at the beginning of the trail(s), telling where each sign and direction leads, and then just paint them on the tree along the trail.


3

Use a finish nail; the undamaged sign will slide off sometime in the future when it has long been forgotten, and the tree will have the smallest wound. I have watched a 16d galvanized finish nail, two inches proud, hold a painted tin can lid to a slow-growing tree for at least a couple of decades. Aluminum sounds like an even better material, if a long ...


2

Here is the National Park Guidelines to your questions, Blazes are placed on trees or posts, slightly above eye level so that hikers can see them easily when traveling in either direction. In areas where the trail receives winter use, blazes are placed higher so they are visible above the snow. Blazes should be within "line of sight"—when standing at ...


2

Painted wood with 2 galvanized nails like this: They do that all the time in Finnish natural parks and such signs can take all the 4 seasons with minimal maintenance. The tree will push the sign outwards as it grows but they won't drop out like ever.


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