11

I used to do some work as a ski technician many years ago, and yes, definitely this is not correct. You should not be able to see the screws from the underside. Take them back for a replacement, they are potentially dangerous and unlikely to last for as long as they could be expected to.


8

This dimension is know as the binding stack height (as well as binding stand height) and can be both beneficial and detrimental: On piste / carving / racing: a larger stack height is generally perceived as beneficial---the FIS even passed a regulation limiting it to 50mm after the thickness of binding plates started getting out of hand. The main benefits ...


7

For most people, having a shop do the mount is a hassle-free and relatively inexpensive way to mount bindings. Shops will often mount the ski "on the line" but many will mount it to your basic specifications. Why mount yourself? In my experience, the main reason someone would choose to mount their own ski bindings is that they want to mount older but still ...


6

No, they didn't do anything wrong (they probably didn't do anything at all). The stoppers purpose is not to stack the skis, it's to stop the skis if they become undone from your boots and slide down the slope. That they help with attaching the two skis together is certainly a nice (and expected) feature, but it's not their main purpose. I had skis which ...


5

The short answer is tech binding compatible boots will work fine with non-tech AT bindings in the vast majority of circumstances. The more involved answer is (as always for safety gear) to check the specific manufacturer recommendations for a specific boot/binding combination. Here is a quote to support that: MOST AT boots and alpine boots will work ...


5

According to this source: Auto-locking toe lever puts you in uphill mode upon step-in, no manual lifting necessary. What this means is you don't have to lift up the toe tab to lock in your toe manually. Racers should appreciate this because it will save a little bit of time when stepping into the skis. That being said I doubt this will be the difference ...


2

You don't need to be looking any further - there is no such adjustment screw. Reason being, there's nothing adjustable there. The purpose of this slider is to facilitate your ski boot moving sideways out of the binding, not to regulate the force at which that happens. It eliminates some friction between the boot sole and bindings, which can vary between ...


2

If you know exactly where your bindings need to be fixed then you don't need the demo plate, and fixing directly to the ski gives a more rigid connection between boot and ski. A demo plate is only really useful if you need adjustment.


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