9

There are two different norms for ski bindings (and their release characteristics): ISO 9462 for alpine ski bindings and ISO 13992 for touring ski bindings. The former is tested together with alpine boots/soles (ISO 5355), the latter with touring boots (ISO 9523), which are bent and have rubber. I assume you are not mixing the boots and bindings of either ...


4

A lot of people are doing the ski service themselves, there is no witchery about this. However, there is some things that can be done wrong as a beginner. Manufacturers grind edges in a certain angle, depending on the ski. If you do the edges you should make sure that you do not change this angle accidentally as this will change how skis behave. There can ...


3

AT skis are optimized towards low weight; downhill skis are optimized towards high stiffness. So in general, AT skis will not be as stiff as downhill skis. Stiffness translates to stability at speed. If skis are less stiff they tend to start to flap at higher speeds, especially on groomed slopes, leading to loss of control. Even moderately experienced ...


3

I use both AT skis and downhill skis. I have different bindings for AT skis (dynafit TLT and Marker where boots connected to the frame). I'm not good at skiing, so for me there is no difference which bindings to use for downhill skiing. Both work just fine. The problem is in skis and boots (not bindings). AT skis are made light and AT boots are soft ...


3

There's nothing wrong with using your AT gear at a resort. Actually, to a degree, your gear will probably see less wear on a resort than during traditional AT use. When climbing hills, your bindings and boots will see on the average a few thousand steps each day. That's thousands of actuations of the pivots in the bindings and the boots. On a resort, your ...


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