Hot answers tagged

26

Yes there are increased risks associated with riding a lift while wearing a pack Hangups The first major risk, mentioned by Paparazzi, is hangups. These occur anytime the pack becomes entangled in the chair. These occur fairly frequently when unloading especially with chair riders unfamiliar with the hazard. The danger is compounded with inattentive lift ...


24

On the right snow, you can ascend extremely steep (even if it probably isn't the most economical thing to do) - so from that aspect, I don't see a problem. Looking at the skiers center of gravity, it doesn't seem to be off by far either. I estimated the center of gravity at the red dot. If the weight was mainly on the back leg, the current orientation would ...


23

First - Assess the situation and determine if an active rescue is possible and safe. Many would-be rescuers are caught or killed in follow up avalanches because they acted without assessing the surrounding conditions. Assuming you have equipment to assist in the rescue follow the guidelines below. Yell to alert your partners and other people that may be ...


22

Skiing is a sport where taking lessons pays off very quickly. Skiing is not an inexpensive sport: a lift ticket, lessons and rentals will cost you several hundred, but if you set aside about 3-5 days, with half day lessons for at least 3 days you should be pretty satisfied that you've cover all of the basics and evolved beyond the basic snow-plow. If you ...


21

Motorcycle helmets should not be used as a replacement for a ski helmet: Most motorcycle helmets weight between 1,000 and 2,000 grams, while ski helmets weigh between 330 and 600 grams. You are expected to fall repeatedly with ski helmets (on the order of up to several times a day), so it needs to be lighter to not exact an additional toll on your neck You ...


21

Telemark -- where the toe is attached, and the heel is free to rise up and down -- allow skiers to skin up back-country slopes with a more natural and efficient stride. However, AT (or randonee) rigs allow skiers that ability while doing alpine turns on the way down. So, in this day and age, why do people still Telemark: A different way to enjoy the ...


21

With a dash of common sense, and a modicum of skill I'd say packs are safe on a chairlift. One winter I skied over 100 days at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. I wore a pack the vast majority of those days. I never once felt that any of my packs at any time were decreasing my safety or the safety of others on the lift, tram, or gondola. According to Outside ...


21

I agree that the mountains in the background look weird, but the crop is so close that it's hard to tell for certain without additional context. This image appears to be from an article on skinning up steep slopes, and states that the skier is on a 34 degree slope: http://straightchuter.com/steep-skinning-technique/ Given that Chris Figenshau appears to be ...


19

It's not recommended to use a kayak or "CE/EN 1385" helmet for skiing. However, you can use a skiing or "CE/EN 1077" helmet for kayaking. The helmets are manufactured and tested for specific conditions. A skiing helmet is for "faster speed" impacts and colder conditions. In contrast a kayak helmet is of course created for "slower speed" impacts and warmer ...


15

Skiing is a full-body, high endurance, activity. Being in good cardio-vascular shape is important, and can be achieved through running, swimming, rowing, etc... This can not be over-emphasized. Get your heart in shape. Assuming you already are in decent shape, here are some exercises that will help you get through those initial days on the hill. I've chosen ...


15

The optimal skin track angle is a subject of much debate in the backcountry skiing world. There are generally two schools of thought on skin tracks. The steeper the better Slow and steady wins the race Since you used "effective" rather than possible, my 2 cents would be that you should set the steepest skin track that allows you to climb at a consistent ...


15

As a beginning skier you will probably be falling down a lot. This means that you are likely to end up covered in snow even if the weather is nice. If you are wearing a soft shell, the snow melting from your body heat is more likely to penetrate the shell and make you cold and uncomfortable. Depending on the local climate, you may also have to worry about ...


14

I don't have the time to give a truly complete answer here, but a good choice for you might be metal edged, waxless, backcountry cross-country skis. Other options might include: Snowshoes (which you don't like) Telemark or Alpine Touring skis (which are heavy, and downhill focused) Postholing (no fun) XC skis are far lighter than a telemark setup (~1.6kg, ...


14

The main (and classical) advantage of telemark skiing is not when you're going downhill, but when you want to travel on skis. Telemark skiing goes back to the days before chairlifts, when the ski was a flotation device used for ascending as well as descending. The free heel (and a set of skins or scales) allows the telemark skier to skin up a hill much like ...


14

First, see my comment above. Get some professional instruction. Seriously. To answer your points directly: Build a snow anchor, then transfer the load to your anchor. Holding your partner's weight for the entire duration of a self rescue would be a bad idea. Building an anchor is independent of what your partner is doing. Always build an anchor. On ...


12

Every ski resort gives lessons, and that's how you should begin. You can rent skis, and they will help you get them on, etc. Dress in clothes you would wear to go sledding. Remember that you work hard, get wet, then sit still. Layers, of wool and acrylic will keep you warm when wet and let you adjust as needed. Cotton makes you cold when wet, so avoid ...


12

Ski wax, like many subtle aspects of sports, is subject to a lot of lore. While there is strong science behind wax, the details of how it affects your daily ski trip is hard to pin down. That said, there are several situations that cause me to re-wax my skis (and we are talking about PTEX based alpine-style skis here, with a melted-in base wax, rather than ...


12

No, it's not vital to have thermal underwear. Layering is your friend. During the winter months, I've been hitting the slopes regularly for the past 8 years or so. Though I do own thermal underwear, I've rarely had to use them. What I normally do is simply layer my clothes and then add/remove as needed to be comfortable. The downside to this approach is ...


12

As the protection required in these activities differ, there are different standards for helmets: EN 1385 for kayaking and EN 1077 for skiing. There are of course even more norms for other helmets. So technically, you need a helmet that fulfils both these norms. I am not aware of a helmet that has both norms. I do however use a Kong Scarab, which fulfils the ...


12

There seem to be many widespread assumptions about helmet design, particularly regarding how well they handle multiple impacts. The poor availability of the relevant standards documents[0] does not do much to help this. As others have mentioned, relevant helmet standards include EN 1385 (for kayaks and whitewater sports) and EN 1077 (alpine skiers and ...


11

Various anti-fog products will work. I actually use the Rain-X anti-fog fluid (I had it for the car anyway and tried it successfully) You just need to clean the inside thoroughly, then apply it and it should last an entire season.


11

In winter your worse enemy is sweating. It is really hard to deal with it once you are sweating. An appropriate thermal underwear will help evacuating sweating instead of retaining it. This been said, an appropriate winter jacket is also essential to keep you warm and also evacuate the sweating from the the internal layers. It is not necessary to pay a ...


11

You definitely need to be concerned if you are using waxless XC skis with fish scales under foot. Skiing over hard dead sticks can break off the edges of these scales (or wear them down over time) making them less effective on climbs. For smooth bottom skis, pine needles, roots, etc will likely do nothing more than scrape the wax off your skis (which if ...


11

6 of one, half dozen of another. A lot comes down to how easy it is to hike in the ski boots you are using. The problem with hiking is that it only takes a short stretch of unpacked trail to lose any gain in time and you can't take advantage of any brief downhill stretches. Even with skins you can get a bit of glide. On the other hand, if the trail has ...


11

The cheapest ways to try cross country skiing are borrowing equipment, yard sale equipment, craigslist, or rentals. If you like it, and rent frequently, that stops being cheap. If you make friends who run or are otherwise active, ask around, and someone might have a spare set of skis and poles they can lend you - you can find them for a few dollars at yard ...


11

I am willing to take the time to learn what I need to, so I don't want to go with the "easier to use at first" option. If you really mean that, then you can't not try skiing. There are many trails in Colorado where it is no easier to go uphill on snowshoes than to go uphill on skis, given even modest technique on skis -- but with even the smallest ...


11

I used to do some work as a ski technician many years ago, and yes, definitely this is not correct. You should not be able to see the screws from the underside. Take them back for a replacement, they are potentially dangerous and unlikely to last for as long as they could be expected to.


11

Really the key to escaping tree wells is to ski/board/snowshoe with a buddy. I have friends who have ended up head down in a tree well, completely unable to reach their bindings. With every movement more snow would fill in the well. If they hadn't been skiing with a partner, it would have been a dire situation. Even with a partner it took a while to get them ...


11

It cannot be that the image is rotated, and that this rotation is the only alteration to the image. The reason is simple: look at the straps of the backpack. They are hanging vertically, and they are aligned with the vertical axis of the image. Essentially, they give us a "plumb line". If the image had been rotated, that detail would have to have been ...


10

Learn to inline skate/rollerblade. Seriously, learn to rollerblade first. Many techniques that you apply to roller blading also apply to skiing, the two activities are very similar, all that varies really is the surface. I roller bladed for a number of years before I first learned to ski, and my ski instructor said that roller blading can help pick up ...


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