Hot answers tagged

26

Yes there are increased risks associated with riding a lift while wearing a pack Hangups The first major risk, mentioned by Paparazzi, is hangups. These occur anytime the pack becomes entangled in the chair. These occur fairly frequently when unloading especially with chair riders unfamiliar with the hazard. The danger is compounded with inattentive lift ...


24

On the right snow, you can ascend extremely steep (even if it probably isn't the most economical thing to do) - so from that aspect, I don't see a problem. Looking at the skiers center of gravity, it doesn't seem to be off by far either. I estimated the center of gravity at the red dot. If the weight was mainly on the back leg, the current orientation would ...


21

With a dash of common sense, and a modicum of skill I'd say packs are safe on a chairlift. One winter I skied over 100 days at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. I wore a pack the vast majority of those days. I never once felt that any of my packs at any time were decreasing my safety or the safety of others on the lift, tram, or gondola. According to Outside ...


21

I agree that the mountains in the background look weird, but the crop is so close that it's hard to tell for certain without additional context. This image appears to be from an article on skinning up steep slopes, and states that the skier is on a 34 degree slope: http://straightchuter.com/steep-skinning-technique/ Given that Chris Figenshau appears to be ...


19

It's not recommended to use a kayak or "CE/EN 1385" helmet for skiing. However, you can use a skiing or "CE/EN 1077" helmet for kayaking. The helmets are manufactured and tested for specific conditions. A skiing helmet is for "faster speed" impacts and colder conditions. In contrast a kayak helmet is of course created for "slower speed" impacts and warmer ...


15

The optimal skin track angle is a subject of much debate in the backcountry skiing world. There are generally two schools of thought on skin tracks. The steeper the better Slow and steady wins the race Since you used "effective" rather than possible, my 2 cents would be that you should set the steepest skin track that allows you to climb at a consistent ...


15

As a beginning skier you will probably be falling down a lot. This means that you are likely to end up covered in snow even if the weather is nice. If you are wearing a soft shell, the snow melting from your body heat is more likely to penetrate the shell and make you cold and uncomfortable. Depending on the local climate, you may also have to worry about ...


14

First, see my comment above. Get some professional instruction. Seriously. To answer your points directly: Build a snow anchor, then transfer the load to your anchor. Holding your partner's weight for the entire duration of a self rescue would be a bad idea. Building an anchor is independent of what your partner is doing. Always build an anchor. On ...


13

As the protection required in these activities differ, there are different standards for helmets: EN 1385 for kayaking and EN 1077 for skiing. There are of course even more norms for other helmets. So technically, you need a helmet that fulfils both these norms. I am not aware of a helmet that has both norms. I do however use a Kong Scarab, which fulfils the ...


12

I am willing to take the time to learn what I need to, so I don't want to go with the "easier to use at first" option. If you really mean that, then you can't not try skiing. There are many trails in Colorado where it is no easier to go uphill on snowshoes than to go uphill on skis, given even modest technique on skis -- but with even the smallest ...


12

There seem to be many widespread assumptions about helmet design, particularly regarding how well they handle multiple impacts. The poor availability of the relevant standards documents[0] does not do much to help this. As others have mentioned, relevant helmet standards include EN 1385 (for kayaks and whitewater sports) and EN 1077 (alpine skiers and ...


11

6 of one, half dozen of another. A lot comes down to how easy it is to hike in the ski boots you are using. The problem with hiking is that it only takes a short stretch of unpacked trail to lose any gain in time and you can't take advantage of any brief downhill stretches. Even with skins you can get a bit of glide. On the other hand, if the trail has ...


11

The cheapest ways to try cross country skiing are borrowing equipment, yard sale equipment, craigslist, or rentals. If you like it, and rent frequently, that stops being cheap. If you make friends who run or are otherwise active, ask around, and someone might have a spare set of skis and poles they can lend you - you can find them for a few dollars at yard ...


11

TL;DR Don't do it. It is really easy to ruin a perfectly good pair of skis. A great way to handle ski maintenance is to wax your own skis, touch up the burrs with a fine grit diamond stone (400-grit or so), and let a professional ski shop handle your edges a couple times per season. This would be analogous to doing your own oil changes on a car, but letting ...


11

I used to do some work as a ski technician many years ago, and yes, definitely this is not correct. You should not be able to see the screws from the underside. Take them back for a replacement, they are potentially dangerous and unlikely to last for as long as they could be expected to.


11

Really the key to escaping tree wells is to ski/board/snowshoe with a buddy. I have friends who have ended up head down in a tree well, completely unable to reach their bindings. With every movement more snow would fill in the well. If they hadn't been skiing with a partner, it would have been a dire situation. Even with a partner it took a while to get them ...


11

It cannot be that the image is rotated, and that this rotation is the only alteration to the image. The reason is simple: look at the straps of the backpack. They are hanging vertically, and they are aligned with the vertical axis of the image. Essentially, they give us a "plumb line". If the image had been rotated, that detail would have to have been ...


10

In addition to telemark, there are randonnee, aka alpine touring bindings. These are basically regular alpine bindings, where the heel can be released, for climbing. When going downhill, the heel can be clipped back in, for greater support during steep alpine descents. Telemark skis usually aren't super great for climbing on their own, and usually require ...


10

Here are a few quick and easy ones that will help your strength: Squats will be the most useful. Not exactly at your desk, but you can definitely do it next to your desk. Seated leg raises. Keeping your legs straight, hold the side of the chair and raise and lower your legs Calf raises. Put your weight on your toes and lift yourself up. You don't need to ...


10

Adding to what others have said: First and foremost: make sure you get your boots fitted properly by a professional boot fitter. A proper snug fit will allow blood flow around the foot keeping them warm. Often cold feet are a sign of problems elsewhere. Once your body/core cools it pulls blood/heat in from the extremities. So layer up and it might just ...


10

If you have no experience with either, then I recommend getting some snowshoes first (I'm not recommending you don't eventually get into everything else as well). There are many different styles of snowshoes out there, the most popular types on the market are the hiking snowshoes with the crampons, but if you're going cross country on flat terrain, then you ...


10

I believe the answer to your specific question is no; the only boots I know of with tech fittings are hard boots made of plastic or carbon fiber. However, I think you may be underestimating those boots. AT boots are hard plastic but can still offer a soft feel. Transitioning to skinning uphill consists of not just unlocking the heels but also switching ...


10

tl;dr I don't think you need spent big money on a new jacket just to go skiing if you have a serviceable soft shell. You can wear anything you want. I know when the ski season is coming to a close some people go skiing in little more than bathing suits on warmer days, and there are competitions where people try to cross/jump over pools of ice water. I skied ...


9

There are two basic designs for bindings for ski-touring: tech/Pin bindings and frame bindings. All examples given are not a generally representative sample as they base on my experience here in Switzerland, where Diamir and Dynafit dominate the market with a recent increase in marker bindings (but mostly in freeriding). Frame Bindings These are similar to ...


9

The answer to this question at its most basic level is generally use your ski crampons until you would feel more safe using boot crampons. I suspect since you asked this question you aren't very experienced with ski crampons and/or boot crampons so I'm going to talk a little bit about their use cases. Ski crampons are only used when ascending, and used in ...


9

There are two different norms for ski bindings (and their release characteristics): ISO 9462 for alpine ski bindings and ISO 13992 for touring ski bindings. The former is tested together with alpine boots/soles (ISO 5355), the latter with touring boots (ISO 9523), which are bent and have rubber. I assume you are not mixing the boots and bindings of either ...


9

I just wanted to give my input as an avid backcountry skier and general ski bum during the winters. As mentioned above, the straps seem like a pretty good indicator that the picture is real. Even if he was moving, skining up a slope is a pretty smooth movement that wouldn't disturb the straps much. If there was any wind then there is a low chance that the ...


8

In many (possibly all) European ski resorts it is mandatory to lower the safety bar in a chair lift. On the chairs I have ridden there is not enough space to sit down while wearing a backpack - I am referring to a backpack that has things in it, such as off-piste gear and a bit of spare clothing. Even if you do not want to lower the safety bar on a European ...


8

As a ski patroller for many years I usually have a pack on when riding the lift. Yes packs can be dangerous, but it is a manageable hazard, and a potentially life saving and life saving and required accessory depending on where you are skiing. People need to be educated about the hazard and how to mitigate it! You determine the hazard by how you wear the ...


8

This article covers the 2 commonly used methods for vertically carrying skis, and their relative advantages and disadvantages. The diaganol: The A Frame: Shoulder Carry: One additional method of carry which I'm a fan of but is not strictly a "pack carry" is on your shoulder. This method has some clear disadvantages but it maximizes your ability to ...


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