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I am not (yet) a slackliner, but I have been impressed with the methodology of testing and development of Adam Burtle of NWslackline.org. His site has a number of videos that demonstrate different anchoring and tensioning systems. He also does line tension measurements and break testing on different setups and materials. When you watch his videos make ...


7

This is a community wiki to add appropriate knots that will work since there will be several. Munter Mule Tensionless Hitch - Assuming you have a long tail after tensioning your line this "no knot" method may work for you. Radium Release Hitch - This incorporates a munter but also builds in a 3:1 load-lifting system, so unlike a munter it's suitable for "...


6

There are lots of options for buying indoor slack line setups, or if you're confident in your engineering abilities, you can build one yourself, I would NOT recommend trying to anchor a slack line to anything in your house, unless you are willing to drill holes in the concrete foundation in your basement to make fixed anchors. DIY Indoor Slackline ...


6

I don't think there can be a definite answer to this question: it all depends on how much tension there is on the slackline. And the slackline tension depends on a few factors, among which there are: the length of the line the width of the line how much the line is actually tensioned body weight of the people walking on the line what the people are doing ...


5

You have probably already seen the excellent resource at www.slackline.com but they have an excellent page on how to tie your slackline to a tree using ordinary webbing and carabiners. Key image from their sequence: Then just add a carabiner (with webbing wrapped round it to protect) to the metal ring and you are set. Total kit required: length of ...


4

If your basement columns are made out of reinforced concrete as I suppose, get a metal stud finder to be sure not to drill the steel and just go for it. Use a chemical bolt (see here: http://www.fischer.de/en/Home/Product-Range/Product-Selector.aspx/cpage-category/pcategory-1001076852/ for an example) by following its instructions and then happily go for it....


4

What you describe is called creep. According to this technical manual Creep is a material property frequently misunderstood and can be defined as the continued extension of a material when subjected to constant, long-term static loading. There are several types of dyneema and some of them have lower creep resistance. Balance community says Some of the ...


4

The slackline goes through the center drum to hold it in place. Better than editing a picture, you can see how it works from this video at 0:49. Basically you have to provide a bit of tension, so that the line wraps around the center drum and then catches and winds on in a "doubled over" form as at 1:20ish in the video.


3

The idea of the training line is three fold: It puts your arms in the correct position. This helps you use better form. It gives you the ability to "push off" the line with your arms, allowing you to balance more easily. You are not putting all your body weight onto the training line. @IanC in the comments nailed it! Faster "results". You can "slackline" ...


3

As close together as you want! Most climbing gyms will set up 5m (ish) lines which is a pretty good distance for beginners. In general you probably don't want to go much less than 3m. Keep it nice and taught while you are learning; the less slack in the line the easier it will be. Most of all just get it set up and have fun. It doesn't need to be set up ...


1

I'd try one or both of the following: REI. At least one employee in the store should have some knowledge. And you can always return within a year if there is a problem with no questions asked. They sell Gibbon slacklines for about $100. Climbing Gym. If your local climbing gym has a slackline setup (which at least one should), then try asking some of the ...


1

To the question Is a slackline, ratchet, and tree protector alone enough equipment to setup the slackline? The answer is yes, provided the kit is built for that purpose. In actuality, you could set it up without bark protectors, but that's frowned upon as it will hurt trees (some more than others). Most kits are made to be setup in a similar way, which ...


1

Slack lining is actually a lot easier in the beginning the shorter your line is, as there will be less movement of the line (side-to-side wobble or up-and-down bouncing). There isn't really a minimum length for a slack line - personally, when I started out I sometimes set up a line no longer than some 3m... So my suggestion is to find some nice trees not ...


1

My son slack lines (6' & 165lbs) on +15 M of 1". Using tree savers and each tree is about 6 to 8 in in diameter. He practices on a staked rigging over 6" rounds that lie on their side at each end of the run. Line is permanently mounted and staked into the ground. So when newbies or his mom gets a wild hair and tries it, they don't bust themselves up.


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