78

In my experience, most standard single sleeping bags, are built so you can zipper them together to make a double. They are designed to zipper to an identical/matched bag, so don't count on buying to different bags and have them work together. Instead of buying a dedicated double bag, buy a matched pair that can be joined. Google sleeping bags that can be ...


73

Humans have a few intuitions about how temperature, heat, and liquids work. These intuitions lead us astray for the specific case of a bladder full of urine. "Keeping Warm" / "Cooling down" The first intuition is that things cool down on their own: If you leave a pie from the oven on your counter, it eventually cools down to room temperature. We believe ...


30

There is another post in which my answer deals with this question among other things. I have not yet met anyone that has tried to sleep with two people in a hammock that still practices it. I have tried it, and while it's ok for a short nap or just relaxing, for overnight and/or multiple nights it's just not comfortable or practical. I have owned two ENO ...


29

Quality of sleep can depend on a multitude of factors. These are some of my experiences: Quality and appropriateness of gear Most people sleep poorly if they get too cold or too hot. Having a quality sleeping bag that is appropriate for your climate and time of year will definitely increase the likelihood that you will get quality sleep. Material matters ...


27

Most important reason to pee before you go to bed: you'll be uncomfortable lying there all night feeling like you have to pee. Second most important reason: if you try to delay it, you'll just have to get up later, in the middle of the night. This means getting out of the bag and getting cold. The REI blog sounds scientifically illiterate to me and does ...


24

The parameters of your girlfriend would matter depending on the ratio of 'space' occupying, but let's ignore that for now. I would put a cord or something around it to minimize the space; air needs to be warmed up too. You should try to tie it in such a way, that you have on one side a 'triple' layer (half of the bag bent, so something like this /---------...


20

I hang my hammocks using the same slings I use for anchors while climbing, a girth hitch around the the tree is more than sufficient, but wrapping the sling around the tree twice, then tying it with a water knot is best. It holds well, it's easy to adjust the height, and it doesn't slip when weighted. The wide surface area of the webbing is better for the ...


16

If you end up with a snake on your chest while sleeping, you can rest assured that the snake is not in an aggressive mood. It's on top of you because it thinks you're cozy and warm, if it's cozy then it's going to be pretty mild tempered. I imagine you could easily grab it behind the head and take it out of your tent. If you don't want to touch it, just flip ...


16

Storing the backpack inside instead of next to you won't provide a whole lot more security, in some crowded places where theft is more common it might be justified. Normally, if I am worried about people my common practice is to keep a low profile and try to camp out of sight. If on the other hand, I know that there aren't any humans for several miles then ...


15

This is not personal experience, but I'll share anyway. I was really into hammocking a few years back and found a guy on one of the message boards who was VERY enthusiastic about sharing a hammock with his girlfriend. He had built a hammock he was very satisfied with, but it had a spreader across the top, which I assume kept their top halves from smooshing ...


15

It depends on the thickness of the mattress and the ground below it. With a very thick mattress and a level ground, it's the opposite: Less air is softer/more comfortable.** The thinner the mat or the less even the ground (e.g. roots), the bigger the chance that you "touch" the ground (i.e. only compressed foam in between) - usually that happens at your hip (...


15

Using canoe paddles to rig tarp shelters seems to be a common practice (e.g. see here or here). I would rig them as in the diagram below - as for an A-frame tarp shelter. I would expect you would need more than 1m height for the centre of the net so I would use the paddles whole not split. The two paddles are on end, pointing up, with the top ends ...


14

Pads have several measurable characteristics that may be important for you when you make a decision: Weight. How much you carry is important if you actually carry it. Weights ranges from ~250g to several kilos. Don't forget to consider the repair kit if needed, the pump if you take one, ... Dimension folded. If you carry it outside your pack make sure it ...


13

Anecdotally, the only three factors which may cause you problems are: supplies running out losing fitness boredom And these are really only an issue if you are stuck for extended periods of time. Your solutions are: exercises you can do in your tent, or just outside - stretches, press-ups, sit-ups, basic cardio - will help you maintain a level of fitness ...


13

I did it for three nights. First night was more like intermittent napping, but my girlfriend slept great. The second night I woke up twice. The third night I was more concerned with the flapping sound from my rain fly, the creaking trees and the sideways wind. After minimizing the flapping sound I slept as fine as I would have in those conditions on my own. ...


13

The single most important consideration for your parents is going to be their comfort. For starters they must have something comfortable to sleep on or they're going to spend every day achy and tired, wishing they were sleeping in their own beds. The older you get, the more precious sleep is. If they can't get a good, comfortable night's sleep, then they ...


13

My wife & I are both in our mid-50's, and we stopped going car camping a few years ago largely because of the lack of sleep and difficulty getting into and out of our tent. Our last trip we were so tired that I was hallucinating on the drive back home & we had to pull over on a mountain road to take a nap before we carried on. Even the nice ...


13

Air Mattress Pros: Comfortable (Come in many varying thicknesses.) Warm (Some air mattresses are down-filled.) Compact (I have one air mattress that can pack down to fit inside a pop can.) Lighter (Not necessarily true for all air mattresses.) Cons: More Expensive More Maintenance (Can easily be punctured.) Some experience required (How firm do you make ...


13

We hardly ever stay in a campground. We usually camp far from a trailhead, and far from the trail, in places where there are no official campsites. We have done this for decades, and nothing has ever been stolen by two-legged critters. When we are leaving our remote camps to take a hike, we put the packs inside the tent and zip up the tent. We always ...


12

Bivy Pros: Very light. No tent poles. Ease of finding a place to sleep. Stealth bivvying is easier. I've slept on a slope against a tree. Very quick to setup or pack away, even in the dark. One minute, compared for ten minutes for a tent. You are at one with nature. Very little between you and the wild. You can fall to sleep looking at the stars. Cons: ...


12

If your parents gear worked for them 10 or 15 years ago. If the gear has not seen significant wear in storage. If your parents have remained in nearly the same physical condition (or better) as 10 years ago. The only thing they need to do is load their gear in the car and go. Seriously, it worked then, it should work now. Much of the older gear is ...


11

Depends on the situation and therefore the gear you have along and the environment you are in. For example if you are on an alpine tour, you can do similar as we did this year in a bivouac: try to get in wind protected area (not so important in your case but even with a tent it changes your comfort) get a flat surface (heads up) lay your ropes directly ...


10

Tents, tarps, and bivvy sacks are three different specialized tools for three different jobs. Tarp I typically prefer a tarp to either a tent or a bivvy sack, but that's because I do most of my camping in California in the summer, when the weather tends to be quite dry. In summer in the Sierra, I usually bring a tarp but sleep in the open and never take ...


10

You say car camping - does that exclude a caravan ? A caravan is a significant investment in cost to buy. There may be somewhere near you that hires/leases/rents them. Plus you'll need a tow fitting on your car rated for the weight of a towed caravan. Electric cars cannot be fitted with towbars (in New Zealand anyway) Some of the places you have camped ...


10

Disclaimer: I go with tarps or tents instead of Bivy's but have used them before. Necessary: Protects you from water Protects you from strong winds Some ventilation (through openings or fabrics) to reduce condensation and allow fresh air flow Large enough to comfortably fit you and not too much bigger (the less empty space, the easier it is to stay warm ...


10

From the viewpoint of physics it's exactly the opposite. You have taken some liquid and you have already spent some of your energy to heat up that liquid. This liquid increases your total heat capacity making your cooling a tiny bit slower. Ryan estimated that your increase in volume might be about 0,3%, your increase in mass will roughly be the same. Yes, ...


9

Cotton is the dominant bedding material choice worldwide for several reasons and as long as you aren't getting into the bag drenched and have adequate water control for your environment, I can't see the lining choice being a make or break factor in warmth. I can see it making the bag much more comfortable for casual use. Furthermore, for winter camping in ...


9

The three risks that are relevant here are the risk of fire, suffocation and carbon monoxide poisoning I'll take suffocation first. A gas leak can exclude oxygen to the point that you can no longer breathe, but there are standard mitigations: the gas canister is usually mounted external to the passenger cabin, in a compartment vented downwards, so that gas ...


9

Theoretically, it depends on the length of time you sleep. What a full bladder does is raise your body's heat capacity by providing you with more mass, so your body temperature goes down more slowly because it is storing more energy in the additional mass of the water in the bladder. However, a full bladder also increases the surface area of your body by ...


9

There is a really good answer by Ryan Cavanaugh, as to the scientific side of emptying your bladder. In short NO your not going to be any warmer for having emptied your bladder. HOWEVER Big picture human stuff, you might actually "feel" warmer in the end. Now to be clear, this is not at all the same as the argument that you have to work harder to warm ...


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