77

In my experience, most standard single sleeping bags, are built so you can zipper them together to make a double. They are designed to zipper to an identical/matched bag, so don't count on buying to different bags and have them work together. Instead of buying a dedicated double bag, buy a matched pair that can be joined. Google sleeping bags that can be ...


23

The parameters of your girlfriend would matter depending on the ratio of 'space' occupying, but let's ignore that for now. I would put a cord or something around it to minimize the space; air needs to be warmed up too. You should try to tie it in such a way, that you have on one side a 'triple' layer (half of the bag bent, so something like this /---------...


16

Storing the backpack inside instead of next to you won't provide a whole lot more security, in some crowded places where theft is more common it might be justified. Normally, if I am worried about people my common practice is to keep a low profile and try to camp out of sight. If on the other hand, I know that there aren't any humans for several miles then ...


15

Using canoe paddles to rig tarp shelters seems to be a common practice (e.g. see here or here). I would rig them as in the diagram below - as for an A-frame tarp shelter. I would expect you would need more than 1m height for the centre of the net so I would use the paddles whole not split. The two paddles are on end, pointing up, with the top ends ...


13

We hardly ever stay in a campground. We usually camp far from a trailhead, and far from the trail, in places where there are no official campsites. We have done this for decades, and nothing has ever been stolen by two-legged critters. When we are leaving our remote camps to take a hike, we put the packs inside the tent and zip up the tent. We always ...


9

A thin (2 or 3mm) steel wire, plastic coated, with a loop at each end works well. Anything between one and two metres will do, depending on tent situation. One end looped round the straps of the bag - or locked with a small padlock to the zip ends, and the other end wherever you prefer. That could be attached to the tent, a tentpole, your sleeping bag zipper,...


9

I assume based on the [backpacking] tag and the phrases "miles away from civilization" and "most contents of a pack are essential" that you are specifically talking about back country camping and not car camping. The reason I am clarifying is my opinions on security are very different for the two and many of the answers presented here are only practical for ...


8

If the bag is laid flat like it would be for two people, it will not be nearly as warm. Basically you are doubling the effective surface area in which to lose heat relative to a single person sleeping bag. If you fold the bag on top of you, you will be keeping the surface area about the same as a single person bag and effectively doubling the insulation. ...


5

Zip-together bags would be the best solution but if you already have a double then just fold the sleeping bag in half and sleep in the top half with the other half underneath you. You get extra cushioning and extra insulation between you and the ground and your weight will keep the sleeping bag (mostly) folded.


5

Two ground anchors The ones which look like large corkscrews, frequently used for securing dogs. If you screw two in next to each other and then attach a padlock between them, neither can be turned to extract them. Removing the ground anchors requires about a foot of soil to be removed. Lock the rucksack to them, and job done. Of course that doesn't ...


5

I’m having trouble finding a link, but I’ve read several praises for a net bag made out of cable. Put the bag in it and lock it closed. When ready to hit the trail again, it collapses into a little ball and goes into the pack. The hard part for OP’s situation is finding something to secure it to. The testimonials I read were from people staying in ...


4

There are many variables, with weight and budget. But given this sentence in your question slept with my backpack wedged uncomfortably beside me due to limited room in a fully manned tent I assume you are in either a one or two person tent, with the rated number of users. Consider upgrading to a tent with extra space. 2 people in a 3 person tent, or ...


3

I'll second the recommendations to buy bags that can zip together. We have the older North Face Cat's Meow, and they work well for my ultralight distance hikes, and for family camping. While you can zip things down, remember that compressing loft is your enemy. Use a light touch.


3

It might be a little colder but I don't think it would be so much colder as people are thinking. It's a bag, not a box or a balloon. The unused area should fall flat leaving little extra air-space inside for you to have to warm. You will feel cool material if you turn in your sleep though. Depending on the weather that might even be a good thing.


2

I've used foam mattress toppers before. So they can absolutely work well but there's a few things to keep in mind. Thickness - 4" is OK and would probably be great for a back sleeper on grass. However, on a more rocky/rigid surface that may only be entry-level comfort and you might find that bigger rocks can be felt underneath. Thus, you might need to find ...


2

Yesterday night was my first experience sleeping together in a hammock in a single sleeping bag. While I cannot say that it's as comfy as single sleeping, there are still a lot of other comments: It IS really warm. TBH I've never slept with someone together in a tent (only in different sleeping bags, so separated). This time in a hammock we were hugging ...


2

You can buy a folding/camping bed: Then stash the backpack below the bed. Since the bed is low, and assuming the backpack is full and rather big, any attempt to take it out will result in the whole bed moving, waking you up to catch the thief before they have a chance to run away with your backpack.


1

I like to use my backpack as a pillow, which is the safest place, next to all my senses and reach of my hands. :-)


1

I'd consider two theft risks: Whole bag being stolen. Bag contents being stolen. Solutions: To avoid the bag being stolen, I'd anchor it somewhere, prefferably close to you. Easiest (and IMO safest) thing to do would be to wrap the bag straps around your body (arms, legs, etc) so that to take it they have to lift a part of your body. It's trickier to ...


1

My buddy just sent me this picture. But he didn't want to send me more detailed pics or a drawing. I'll keep this answer up to date whenever I'll have more details.


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