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30

Is it "severely dangerous"? Maybe Is there risk? Absolutely I'm going to say first off that you seem like you have little to no hiking/outdoor experience, and whatever answers me or other users give you here are NOT a substitute to knowing and understanding the hazards and risks yourself. Hiking is usually a pretty safe activity, but you can easily get ...


29

When a rattlesnake gets his rattle on, what exactly is the desired reaction it's expecting from you, and what other indicators does it give you that a strike is imminent? It's a warning that it's there, it's not necessarily a warning that it's about to strike (though of course, it could.) Likewise they won't always rattle before they strike. However, bear ...


24

Already some great answers here. TBH, haven't been able to go through all of them, so adding in a short summary as what I do and ask people to follow. Answer to question 1: Rule of thumb: Never ever ever ever try to handle a snake. If you don't know what snake it is, whether venomous or not, or a semi-venomous, refer rule #1. If you don't know a snake well ...


20

I'd suggest being very careful with information about venomous snakes on the internet. The reason is the USA's traditional preponderance on that medium (particularly the English-speaking portion of it). The USA is somewhat unusual in that almost all venomous snakes one is likely to encounter are Pit Vipers. These snakes have a special muscle for pumping ...


18

The best thing to do is just avoid it completely. If you can't go around because the bush is too thick, find a plenty long enough stick and get it off the path. The snake won't chase you, it's just defending itself. Do NOT pick the snake up with the stick, just get a hook on it as best you can and fling it gently off the path.


18

Ahh, I have been waiting for this. This answer would definitely be not much of a help if you hate complicated biology and physiology and related terms. But anyone who is equally interested in snakes is welcome to have a read through. While I am really sorry that I can't simply answer it as these many months or these many years, what I can explain here is a ...


18

There is hardly anything very effective first aid as such, considering the fact that you are 5 hrs walk from any medical facility. I guess I can assume that you will be roaming in rain forests of Agumbe or anywhere in Southern Western Ghats since you referred to King Cobras. If in India, you would definitely like to take a look at The Big Four. ...


16

If you end up with a snake on your chest while sleeping, you can rest assured that the snake is not in an aggressive mood. It's on top of you because it thinks you're cozy and warm, if it's cozy then it's going to be pretty mild tempered. I imagine you could easily grab it behind the head and take it out of your tent. If you don't want to touch it, just flip ...


15

I basically agree with Escoce's answer but you should give the snake a little more time. In the most cases it tries to avoid you and will flee as soon as you come too near. Escoce: The best thing to do is just avoid it completely. If you can't go around because the brush is too thick. Then find a plenty long enough stick and get it off the path. If ...


14

The concern is valid; your basic plan should be to stay calm and not increase your heart rate. If other options for evacuation are not available, slowly walking yourself out is the best remaining option. The bitten area can swell quite a bit, so remove nearby jewelry or clothing to prevent them from turning into tourniquets. If you have a pen you can use ...


14

About the only real danger of the ones you mentioned is a scorpion under a rock you just picked up. They do hide in crevasses under rocks during the day. Just be aware that there might be a scorpion under any rock, and pick it up accordingly. For example, if it's a fist-sized rock, don't pick it up by wrapping your hand around it. If in doubt, kick the ...


13

Mate, I am so glad to know that you and your daughter are safe. First, Rattlers are often found under rocks and logs, particularly if the temperature doesn't suit them. So instruct your kids and other concerned people about it. Rattlesnakes are typically capable of striking up to a distance equal to 1/3rd to half of their overall length, although longer ...


12

I hike in generally the same area of the country, mostly on the AT around NC and VA. Snakes in this area will be most active during spring and fall months. Generally they will be more active in moderate temperatures. In extreme cold and extreme heat you'll see less snakes. In the summer they will be more active in the early mornings and evenings. During ...


11

Stop and move away. Generally that's all you need to do. The rattle is a defensive warning. Develop the instinct (and teach your kids to do so as well) that you freeze, locate it, and move in the opposite direction the instant you hear a rattle, and you should be fine.


11

When a snake rattles at you, it wants you to move away from it. Rattlers will warn you first before striking, giving you enough time to move away. My wife and I were hiking once in the desert, she was ahead of me and passed right by a large diamondback snake that was curled up next to the trail. He coiled up and rattled at her, scaring her so that she ...


11

I keep on telling people that they should never try to restrict the blood flow by using a tourniquet or a tight restricting bandage. It has been a stupid myth among people, visualizing that the snake bites a person and the venom gets mixed in blood like you dip a color paint brush into the water bowl and water turns into a different color. This is not how it ...


11

You cannot overcome a phobia without facing the cause that triggers the fear in the first place, at least in a indirect way. To close the book on a phobia and throw it away really cannot help one get over a phobia. Many people get professional help to deal with their treatment of phobias. Like anything else the degrees of phobias vary from individual to ...


9

As you specifically mentioned Southern Nevada Mojave Desert, if you come across a snake and considering the worst case its a venomous snake, then its very likely to be a Rattlesnake or a Side Winder or an Adder. The best way to avoid trouble with venomous reptiles is to be aware of your surroundings and observe some rules for your own safety. Most bites ...


9

First, to directly answer your question: no, don't run. Running increases your heart rate, which increases how fast the venom will be spread through your body. It also increases the likelihood of another injury such as a twisted ankle, which would further delay treatment. Your first priority is to distance yourself from the snake and any of its friends. ...


9

Rattlesnakes will generally only strike when provoked. That is the very reason we hear them rattle. Keep in mind a rattler cannot produce more venom quickly, so they too prefer to flee rather than bite. Young snake tend to be more aggressive and do not know how to control their venom. If you hear one close to you, back away slowly. Once far enough away they ...


9

Already a couple of nice answers by imsodin and Liam. I'll add 2 cents to it. Might appear a bit lengthy, but for me its essential. I keep on telling people that they should never try to suck the venom out of a snake bite or why are venom extractors useless, it is not just for the safety of the one who is sucking, but also to educate why that is of ...


9

Yes, the bite of a common krait (Bungarus caeruleus) can be painless. It is a venomous snake found on the subcontinent of India and is also known as the Indian krait. Kraits are nocturnal, therefore instances with humans most often occur at night and therefore the snake may also not be seen. Source: Common krait (Wikipedia)


8

Response for the question #1: I grew up in an area filled with Prairie Rattlesnakes and in grade school we were taught the following. It always worked for me and during summer vacation it was common to come across a rattler every day. Before reading the steps please be warned that the Prairie Rattlesnake is known to be less aggressive and wants to flee ...


8

The skin of snakes is covered with tough scales, similar to fingernails. On the upper surfaces of their bodies these tend to be approximately round or diamond shaped and on the underside are usually longer bands running across. These scales both provide protection from abrasion and can also help it to grip surfaces it is moving over. On some species the ...


8

In this situation, if you wanted to preserve the life of the snake, I would have recommended you used your poles to pick it up, swing it out over the gorge side of the trail and place it back on the ground behind you. You may have also had success using the basket of your pole to hold it's head down while you walked past. Myself, I would have simply ...


8

This is simply a compendium of relevant answers already given. Hopefully someone will come up with an original more detailed answer. This is from an answer by WedaPashi in What are the first aid precautions to be taken in case of a snake bite?. Do not let anyone try to suck the venom out of the bite site. (I have heard cases of such a horrid thing done, and ...


8

It is thought that noise generally will not be affective to make copperheads slither away. Making a lot of noise frightens snakes. Mostly false. For one thing, "snakes lack external ear openings and are deaf to airborne sounds, so they won't hear or be afraid of pure noise," Beane said. "But they can feel vibrations through the substrate extremely ...


7

Last summer I did a yo-yo of both the Toyaibe Crest and the Ruby mountains while also summitting both Mt Wheeler and Boundary Peak. The mountains aren’t particularly dangerous, other than the big summits I did there really wasn’t any times where I was particularly concerned. Snakes are less of a concern in the alpine areas and the other wild animals get ...


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