23

First - Assess the situation and determine if an active rescue is possible and safe. Many would-be rescuers are caught or killed in follow up avalanches because they acted without assessing the surrounding conditions. Assuming you have equipment to assist in the rescue follow the guidelines below. Yell to alert your partners and other people that may be ...


11

Really the key to escaping tree wells is to ski/board/snowshoe with a buddy. I have friends who have ended up head down in a tree well, completely unable to reach their bindings. With every movement more snow would fill in the well. If they hadn't been skiing with a partner, it would have been a dire situation. Even with a partner it took a while to get them ...


10

There are three important aspects: Maneuverability, exposure to wind and firm attachment. The optimal orientation for all of those is vertical. Most of the board is then covered by the body so there is minimal added wind resistance compared with horizontal mounting, were most of the board sticks out on the side and act as a huge sail. With horizontal ...


9

To expand a bit on the good answer already given: Slope - 25-45 degrees is a good broad suggestion, but your region of the country will have a big impact on this. Maritime snow is wetter and stickier, so tends to be most dangerous at steeper angles. Transitional and Continental snow is less wet, so has a most dangerous slope range on the lower end of the ...


9

Camber - Where the ski or snowboard creates a slightly concave shape in relation to the snow surface. Better hard snow and ice grip. Makes the board or ski "carve" the snow. Rocker - Where the ski or snowboard has a slight convex shape in relation to the snow surface. Better soft snow lift and float. Makes the board or ski "smear" the snow. Hybrid - ...


8

Scandinavia is a good option, the more north you go the better. For me the nature there is more remote, more 'raw' compared to the Alps. So I would think it's comparable with Canada (although I've never been to those regions). If you can choose when to go, why not go during winter time. You can add late autumn and early spring too. In this timespan you ...


8

As a rough guide to waterproofness - 5000mm is generally rainproof but won't necessarily stand up well to torrential rain. Around 15000 should be fine in that context. If you go higher than that then you're looking at fabric that can be immersed in water and still stay waterproof for a while, but should be ample for any rain shower that might come along! ...


7

First of all: the boots are the most important equipment for snowboarding! It's good to read something about it but please go to a real board-shop before purchasing them! Choose one of those fancy ones where guys hang around listening to punk/rap-music :) The common ski- or sport-shops are in general not that reliable when it comes to snowboarding. The ...


7

The different types of snowboards are: All-mountain: Versatile snowboards that can be used on all parts of the mountain, including machine-groomed runs, backcountry, and park and pipe. Freestyle: Boards that are light, short, and flexible, and ideal for terrain parks and doing tricks (riding rails, jibbing, etc) Freeride: Boards that are ideal for ...


7

I think the answer is as simple as: If you own a mid-layer wear it to the store when you purchase the shell. If you own a shell wear it to the store when you purchase your mid-layer. If you don't own either purchase them together to ensure best fit. There are several different layering systems find what works for you and try everything on in store. If ...


7

These are transponders that the riders wear. They provide data to the judges, most notably amplitude or height achieved out of the halfpipe. In effect, each athlete now controls his or her own clock, determining when it stops and starts and, increasingly, carrying it along the way. Speed skaters wear transponders on their ankles that mark their location, ...


6

In addition to Dangeranger's answer: If you as victim have climbing equipment or a rope, fasten it to your body (if not already fastened) and release your rope. It is very, very hard to find avalanche victims, some are not even found after hours of searching. The chance that at least some part of 30 m rope will be over the surface and therefore allows ...


6

That are a lot of questions for one question... Mountain = report for the top of the mountain, the highest point in that area (start of the piste is somewhere up there) Valley = same for the valley, the lowest point Height = height above sea level for both Fresh snow = the snow that has fallen recently, how much is needed depends on the piste (are there ...


6

As for most outdoor activities, you can certainly get by with non-specialized clothing for skiing and snowboarding. As @imsodin points out in the comments, a ski resort is (compared to a lot of outdoor settings) a pretty safe place to make a mistake about clothing: if you find yourself too cold or wet, you can get indoors quickly; if you stay on-piste, your ...


6

To add to Can't Tell's great interpretation, a good day to go snowboarding would mean: Not so cold it's uncomfortable to be outside (adequately dressed) Not a bad day to be outside for any other reason Not so warm the snow is slushy, or worse melting. Snow not melting for any other reason Snow deep enough your snowboard isn't going through the snow and ...


5

Like a lot it comes down to preference. Assuming from your current setting you do not ride fakie/switch a lot. (Then something like +12°/-12° would more appropriate, and the following paragraph would be less helpful.) Something that is preferable in deep powdery snow is to have a long nose and a short tail (which is something you can observe also in the ...


5

25-45 degrees of slope. If you can avoid this, you'll avoid most avalanches. New snow or newly wind-loaded snow. Unstable snow that collapses under your feet with a "whump". Pillowy or wavy looking snow. Recognize an avalanche chute -- an area with missing trees, messed up snow, etc.


5

I first learnt snowboarding twenty years ago, when boards and bindings were rigid, the boards were long and asymmetrical, and back then carving was the way to turn. You'd lean right over (sometimes 75-80 degrees over) and the board would carve itself round a turn. Modern boards are much more flexible, and what your instructor means by twisting is that you ...


5

Getting trapped in a tree-well is equally as dangerous as getting buried by an avalanche. In fact, it's claimed that tree-wells account for ~20% of all ski deaths. Every professional guide I've ever skied with has warned that tree wells are just as deadly as avalanches. You need to treat tree-wells with the same respect you treat avalanche terrain: Don't ...


5

You aren't going to get an edge while you're scraping down the slope. What you need to do is get your board pointed down the slope so you can turn and cut a new edge. You will gain some speed attempting this, but essentially what you need to do is get up and get your board under control before you can turn and get your edge back. If you're on your butt, try ...


5

There are basically two ways to go slower while boarding. First, point more across the slope, rather than down it. Easier said than done, sometimes. Secondly, washing off speed by letting the board move slightly sideways, rather than nosefirst. This is the equivalent of snowplough. Let's say you're regular-footed, and riding heelside, so you're travelling ...


4

This is why most snowboarding and skiing gloves these days have a wiper built in. Rain-X and other coatings can help a little, but there appears to be no all purpose solution, so just get a pair of gloves with a wiper, and get used to using it frequently.


4

I know an answer has already been accepted but I figured I'd chime in. Preface: I had an AWFUL pair of boots that aged terribly. They were cheap, general sports store off season specials. I don't know if the fit was wrong (I have very thin legs) or if the construction was just that bad, but the tongue would "float" to the outside on both boots after only ...


4

If it ain't broke don't fix it. These's only one real guideline for sharpening anything, and that is to sharpen things when they get dull. If your edges aren't dull, or dinged, or rusty, then they likely don't need to be serviced. Inspect your bases and edges for any nicks or gouges regularly, if you take your board or skis to the shop to get waxed ...


4

I find that horizontal is often not convenient. It will get caught in narrow paths, it will get in the way of your arms if you use poles to go up, and it can easily get unbalanced, pulling strongly on one side. On the other hand, most dedicated packs allow you to secure the board vertically, which works very well. You need to secure it very tight to ...


4

Like Jon Custer said, move your board so it's level (board not not pointing downhill) and then lean into the slope. I.e. you want someone downhill of you to be able to see some of the bottom of the board. (You can do this facing either upslope or downslope.) Think of it as trying to use the snow piling up under your board as the brakes. Of course, the ...


3

I ride a lot and have never seen any gadgets for fixing this. It depends on the snow as well, since the bigger wetter stuff (so cal / washington mountains) tends to be much more of a problem than the bone dry stuff (co / slc mountains). Worse is that in conditions with lots of snow coming down you may want to wear goretex shell mitts, and regardless you'll ...


3

Rocker is a term common for freeride ski and snowboards. Because of the deep snow (powder) you need ski which are floating by design. That means it is easier to ride in powder with a higher rocker. Rocker technically means the negative preload the ski/snowboard are having. So if you lay them on the ground without any load, the ski only touches the ground in ...


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