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28

First off, I want to make clear that this applies to skiing and snowshoeing as a means of long-distance travel. It doesn't directly apply to skiing in specifically for the descents. Skis are better for: Lake traveling: The snow on frozen lakes tends to be firmer and this enables the ski's inherent advantage, glide. Even when pulling a sled, skis will be ...


20

This is really interesting, and I think it might be similar to why we don't generally have snow tires / chains etc as a common item here in stores. Certainly the South rarely gets snow, with Wales, The North and Scotland being more likely to get snow days. From the MET Office: The UK gets on average 33 days of snow fall or sleet a year (1971 - 2000). ...


14

Summary from a winter spend in Winnipeg long ago compared to Central European conditions: there are probably good reasons why native North American people went with snowshoes while native Europeans invented skis. terrain Snowshoes have advantages over skis in bushy terrain off trail (where long skis become super cumbersome) or rugged terrain. Canadian ...


11

In addition to the good answer by Aravona, there are two important reasons: Snow shoes are impractical on steep terrain because they put a lot of stress on your ankles. If you are going to buy equipment for going up snow-covered mountains, there is a much better solution: mountain skis with skins attached. Skins increase the grip tremendously. Example: ...


11

I am willing to take the time to learn what I need to, so I don't want to go with the "easier to use at first" option. If you really mean that, then you can't not try skiing. There are many trails in Colorado where it is no easier to go uphill on snowshoes than to go uphill on skis, given even modest technique on skis -- but with even the smallest ...


10

If you have no experience with either, then I recommend getting some snowshoes first (I'm not recommending you don't eventually get into everything else as well). There are many different styles of snowshoes out there, the most popular types on the market are the hiking snowshoes with the crampons, but if you're going cross country on flat terrain, then you ...


10

There are three important aspects: Maneuverability, exposure to wind and firm attachment. The optimal orientation for all of those is vertical. Most of the board is then covered by the body so there is minimal added wind resistance compared with horizontal mounting, were most of the board sticks out on the side and act as a huge sail. With horizontal ...


10

By engaging in winter sports (where there is significant snow on the ground) you are already greatly reducing your impact. The biggest impacts to back-country areas from non-motorized recreation come from vegetation disturbance: boots grinding up plants and breaking topsoil, tents compressing vegetation, camp activity destroying vegetation, fire scars, etc. ...


10

I think it's quite similar to skiing because the reason for kick-and-glide is to save energy. Same for snowshoes; try not to elevate the whole weight of the shoe for every step. Of course in deep snow you have to lift the leg including the snowshoe quite high, but not as high as you'd have to not wearing snowshoes. Open the fixture at the back to make the ...


9

Snowshoes are available in the UK, but generally you have to go to more specialist mountaineering shops. I doubt any of the high street chains stock them, instead look at the smaller independent shops. Especially those shops located close to mountainous areas, where snowshoes could be more useful. eg Braemar Mountain Sports have a few models Icicle, in ...


8

Snowshoes will fit on either right or left foot, most people recommend facing the binding buckles toward the outside of your feet as it keeps the buckles from coming into contact with one another. Is there a right and left shoe? While both snowshoes will fit on either right or left foot, we recommend facing the binding buckles toward the outside of ...


8

Walking technique You can save energy by not lifting your shoe higher then needed. And also how long steps you take. If it's steep try to make smaller steps to save energy. If you walk with poles use your poles with the correct length and technique as with cross-country-skiing, both for every step, one per step or asymmetric. Path planing I think you can ...


7

I would consider two items: Trekking poles with large baskets. And if you are looking for a pair of modern snowshoes Consider models which have bars at the rear to elevate your feet during ascent. It is common to use the trekking pole to flip the bar up when required.


6

There is one often forgotten thing in skiing that can be harmful. The waxes. The racing ones contain a lot of fluorocarbons that can stay in the environment for ages. The pure racing fluorocarbons (mostly powders) are dangerous even to people applying them and special masks should be worn (see). Consider using just pure hydrocarbon waxes or other waxes ...


5

Most styles of snowshoes are symmetrical, and will work on either foot, but some bindings are designed to be right or left handed, meaning that they are easier to operate with one hand or the other. Lace up bindings can be worn on either foot without any problem, but snowshoes equipped with buckles and straps on one side of the binding are easier to ...


5

Snowshoeing is ridiculously easy, will get you everywhere, and is quite cheap. Where I live you can rent them for the entire season for, IIRC, 60$. Cross-country skiiing (off trail, that is) require knowing how to actually ski, and also specific material, like cross-country bindings, possibly shoes (with insert). I don't know much about cross country ...


4

Elevation bars are great, but more important are the grips/spikes on the bottom, not just for icy snow, but for fallen wood/exposed roots which are especially slippery in the winter. That traction makes all the difference. Ideally the grips run parallel to the length of the snowshoe, usually to the outside, and an additional grip runs across the toe where ...


4

Search and rescue guy here. It's been a while since I've skied, XC or downhill, but I do plenty of snowshoeing, and they are nothing alike, even with shallow snow. If anything, snowshoeing on shallow or crusty snow is more like using crampons. Just keep your gear tight, with straps pointing out (eg, gaiter strap on left foot is pointing left, straps on right ...


4

I find that horizontal is often not convenient. It will get caught in narrow paths, it will get in the way of your arms if you use poles to go up, and it can easily get unbalanced, pulling strongly on one side. On the other hand, most dedicated packs allow you to secure the board vertically, which works very well. You need to secure it very tight to ...


3

I have the Denalis and I also found it difficult to tighten the straps in the cold (it was -20 C the first time I put the snowshoes on.) I found if I fit them to my boot first in the warmth of my house and then loosened the heel straps a couple of holes it was easy to tighten them up again in the cold. I found the the straps came loose in the frontmost ...


3

If you're not walking on very steep slopes, there is basically no special technique to learn. On steep slopes, you can use many of the same foot techniques as with crampons, and in fact many snowshoes include a type of built-in crampon. Front-pointing doesn't work with snowshoes, however, and I don't think three-o'clock position works either. Snowshoes ...


3

Look for a pack where the ice axe is on the side of the back. Strapping snowshoes to the back of a pack is fairly trivial: usually I rig a loop at the bottom of the pack about 4" in diameter. Run the tails of the shoes through the loop, and a bungie cord areound the body of the pack hooking into the toes. (I'm using Ojibway style wood and babiche ...


3

I believe you should search for backpacks that are specifically marketed for snow-shoeing/ backcountry skiing and check if they allow carrying ice tools as well. I haven't tested it myself, but it looks like Osprey Kode 30 could be a good fit for you. Well, at least if you don't require a bigger bag. Also, the post seems a bit old, not sure if they still ...


2

With the little information provided the safest educated guess would be porcupine having a wintertime meal. An extension.org page on barkstripping discusses the issue and lists likely culprits and telltale signs: Identifying the cause of the bark damage is fairly easy. Beavers and rabbits can only strip bark as high as they can stand. Black ...


2

In addition to the other answers: you might take a look at snowblades. These are very short skis, which means that you can both ski and relatively easily cross forests. --Edit Bear in mind that next to advantages of both, they have disadvantages of both as well. It may be wise not to use them if you don't have experience with them.


1

Some things you can try to hold the boot in place that work for me: Strap the toe, then the heel. Strap the rest of the foot straps. Then, re-tighten the toe & top straps so they are really tight. It helps to think about pushing your foot back into the heel strap. Really pull on the straps. You're probably already doing this, but you can always pull ...


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