Hot answers tagged

32

I am not sure about the being able to feel more, but the most important reason I don't use socks is to avoid the rock boot sliding on my foot. If you are on a marginal grip using just the edge of your sole, you don't want the boot to move at all. This is also one of the reasons that rock boots for more experienced climbers are much more rigid than those ...


18

I've been bouldering outdoors for a couple years now and let me ask you this question in return: Why wear socks in your climbing shoes? What is the possible benefit to wearing socks? Try it. Your shoes will still stink, I guarantee. Your feet run the risk of slipping around in your climbing shoes. And if you buy tight, aggressive shoes, the fit will go all ...


16

Sleeping with the socks on your torso is the most effective method I have found, and it does not require anything you wouldn't already have. For this, you just: Take socks off Put them inside your shirt, under all layers of clothing. They should be touching your skin. Sleep Wake up in the morning with dry socks. This works with a lot of things: socks, ...


14

Simply throwing them in the wash should suffice, but if you want to be extra sure the fungus dies, you could soak your socks in a 1 part bleach to 10 parts water mixture for ten minutes. Keep in mind that it's not your socks you need to worry about so much as your shoes, they're a little more difficult to clean. Try changing your insoles out, they make ...


14

For any type of cold you want wool socks. I wear one type of socks all year-round: They are 74% merino wool, 20% nylon, and 6% Lycra Spandex. They breath very well, and keep you feet warm even when they are wet. I wear them in my hiking boots in the heat of the summer, and all the way down to -30°C. I have them on my feet right now actually. I've been ...


13

Because you want to increase your chances of contracting nail fungus or athlete's foot from your rental shoes :) In other words, it's probably better to keep the socks on if you're renting shoes.


11

I believe it is mostly a matter of taste. Many people claim that going barefoot inside the climbing shoes allows you to feel a bit more of the surface than with socks. Granted, you can't feel much through the thick rubber of the shoes to begin with, but I can see how that would be true. Others counter claim that socks make your shoes less stinky after a ...


11

Just change socks. I always wear different socks when hiking compared to when doing anything else, like driving. I don't like hiking with thin socks and shoes and I don't like driving with thick socks and boots. It only takes a couple of minutes to change.


10

Well, basically the difference is just that their design is mirrored. However, I have the feeling that your real question behind the actual one is "Why do they have to be mirrored?" Compared to "normal" socks, which are basically just a symmetrically knitted tube that is closed at one end and has a kink somewhere in the middle and can be worn on either left ...


10

(Late answer here.) A scholarly report discusses fungus and laundry Several years ago, a scholarly report was published. The report's "Appendix A" discusses, among other things, how you should do laundry if someone in the home has a fungal infection. The advice given The report advises: Whenever you do laundry, add some activated oxygen bleach (AOB). ...


10

When would actually one want to wear exactly cotton socks? Hygienic reasons where washing your socks hot (95 °C) and frequently is important. I guess the most common such reason (besides being doctor/nurse/...) is having a fungal infection. In that case in addition to the proper medication you should change your socks frequently (if they get moist even more ...


9

Every layer between your feet and the ground (or hill or whatever you are climbing) adds some distance resulting in: - less balance - less 'feel' with the type of material you are climbing - you feel ditches/gaps/small stones better (depends on how thick your shoes are) Also you might be able to have smaller (less wide) shoes making it easier to place a ...


7

I carry a pair of cotton socks on every backpacking trip for one reason: To sleep in. After a day on the trail, nothing like a dry pair of comfortable cotton socks to absorb all that foot moisture and leave your feet toasty dry by morning. Helps keep your feet happy and healthy. Bonus ProTip: A cotton handkerchief wedged in other "moist" and chaffing areas ...


7

Wicking is not the most important factor here. You need a material that wicks and also has good insulation when moist / wet. With boots her feet are going to sweat in the car. This is a good article from REI Cotton: 100% cotton is not recommended as a sock material for hiking. Cotton absorbs sweat, dries slowly, provides no insulation when wet ...


6

One problem with hemp compared to wool is how it conducts heat when it is wet. Wet hemp conducts heat very well when wet which means your feet could get freezing cold. Wet wool is a poor heat conductor so even if wet they will not be as cold.


6

You most definitely do not need specialized socks. If your socks suit you when hiking, chances are good they will for skiing as well. And as you said merino should also be good for warmth. As for the length: The important thing is, that the upper end is outside/above the ski boot. If the end is inside, that's a point of friction and especially on your shins,...


5

A key part of the answer is to wear socks that dry more quickly. Most of my life I've never really questioned the superiority of Merino loop socks such as the SmartWool PHDs. But I've begun to realise that once they get wet they are slow to dry and unpleasant to put on when cold. So recently I've been experimenting with Bridgeport CoolMax synthetic liner ...


5

The esoteric "answer": Try footwraps. Advantages: dirt cheep can be wrapped in any preferrable way, to provide the most padding against the most aggressive edges of Your shoe at a short break(5min) - re-wrap the footwrap in the opposite direction i.e. the cloth, that is wet from the sweating feet goes up against the ankle and calf to dry out and vice ...


4

The most important things are: Do what works for you. Try boots with the type of socks you intend to wear them with. Sock weight can be used for fine tuning even once you've bought the boots but these two points are critical. You may find that the "better" socks (with padded weight-bearing sections) are worse for you than cheaper hiking socks with a ...


4

Going along the "homebrew supply" route, peracetic acid AKA PAA/peroxyacetic acid is a reasonably safe and very effective sanitizer. It's used in hospitals and by veterinarians, as well as in the brewing industry. I've splashed it on myself and my partly wool socks (and shoes) enough times that I'm confident it won't hurt your socks. Use suggestions: ...


4

The problem seems to be not in the socks. She should prevent her legs\socks from getting wet. I suggest to take off the shoes while driving. Especially shoes with Thinsulate. If her legs\socks are wet then it will be cold in any socks.


3

Availability factor - cotton socks you can buy practically everywhere. When it comes to price, the wool socks you can buy relatively cheap in the military surplus, but it usually means buying in internet. Wool socks are good for winter, but for me they are not-an-option in summer because my feet sweat in them like mad. Wool socks are also heavier and taking ...


3

Chlorine Bleach is not good for wool. Found a solution that worked for me - phenolic disinfectant (Lysol) the web site also suggested Pine Oil (Pine Sol or Lysol Pine Action) http://laundry.about.com/od/handwashing/fl/How-to-Wash-Wool-Socks.htm Remember to also disinfect towels, shower shoes/sandals, etc as the athlete's foot fungus can spread via laundry ...


3

First I use the trick of wringing out the excess water with a ultralight packable towel. Then I strap them to my ridge line in my hammock just above where my legs are. The heat coming off my body, even in the cold a little bit, seems to dry out the socks a little bit. In cold and noise weather, I make sure I have the ability to rotate clothing, but there are ...


3

I would not advise putting wet socks anywhere near anything that's preventing you from getting cold if it would generate a risk of hypothermia through decreased insulation or increased heat conductivity. Using your body heat to dry socks is dangerous in cold conditions as you're taking heat from yourself. With this in mind, you should use an external heat ...


3

I think this is highly dependent on your feet. Maybe with more experience, this will change for me - but I have bony, clammy, wide but low volume paddle feet. So unless I can't get a shoe highly tailored to my foot I need the sock to soak up side-to-side space (even if my toes are very tight after going down a half size).


3

"Cushioning" can be better achieved with an insole designed for that specific purpose. Since almost all hiking boots allow you to swap insoles, there is no reason to get socks for "cushion". Cushioning also doesn't really help with blisters (though this is hotly debated as you can see here). Thicker socks will help with warmth but there are also other ...


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