We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
24

Diagnosing hypothermia requires a special thermometer, as most over-the-counter thermometers are not accurate below 34.4 °C (93.9 °F). Additionally, local body temperature variations means you need to use a rectal, esophageal or bladder thermometer, which you probably aren't going to want to use in the wild. Even if you had that, there is variation from ...


14

Being without a sold "roll", partner, or paddle float can make it quite challenging for a novice to re-enter their kayak after a capsize. However there are techniques which will make it easier to get back in your boat safely. Note: All of these should first be practiced in mildly shallow water, in flat water. Don't practice in rough water until you can ...


13

This is a great question. There are many different kinds of measuring body temperature, from oral/anal digitals, temporal/infrared digitals, glass, strips, non-contact infrared, and ear thermometers. First off, any battery-operated thermometer is useless when the batteries run out. This can happen when the batteries wear down, but it can also happen when ...


10

Summary: Develop muscle memory for the basic move through instruction and repetition, develop robustness against external water conditions, and address the internal panic response. Develop muscle memory: get some instruction and then practice the basic mechanics of a roll until you can do it thoughtlessly. The investment in the instruction is well ...


7

The most important factor is to have some slack in your roll. If you're only just coming up in flat water you're not going to be coming up as soon as there's an additional factor against you. Make sure that as you practice your roll you're not at the end of your movement as you come up. The places to find that slack are to: improve your hip flick ...


7

I've been in the early stages of hypothermia before, and I can tell you from experience that when you're in the early stages of hypothermia, you're convinced you're okay and that nothing is wrong; as in shivering and shaking uncontrollably while trying to convince the people around you, "Oh I'm fine, I don't feel cold at all I don't know why I'm shaking so ...


5

You can usually lay the paddle across the kayak as if you had a paddle float and use it for stability to climb in. It's not as stable as a paddle float, but it's better than nothing. If there is another kayaker with you, they can pull up along side you and hold the floatless end of your paddle on their cockpit. You can also climb in over the side without ...


5

It's been some time, but at our canoe club our sea kayaks were outfitted with one of two systems (others I have no experience with): A hand pump mounted in the deck like this: (Source: UK Sea Kayak Guide Book) A simple tube-like pump with two unidirectional valves mounted on the foot rest. It constantly pumps with every pushing action against the ...


4

Disclaimer: Despite a comment I made earlier about how I too would like to hear about ways to test for hypothermia, I should stress that relying on this could be potentially dangerous and should be a last line of defense, not first. That is, always assume that you could be even if your test is negative, instead of assuming that you are not until it is ...


4

If you are confident and not out of breath, reattach the skirt before the roll after upside-down re-entry (re-entry and roll mentioned above). It takes a lot of effort and maybe a nose plug. But if you can do it, it saves a lot of pumping effort.


3

There's no reason why a boat of this type could not be used for short expedition type trips, assuming you stay within the capabilities of the boat and paddler. As boats of this type don't usually have watertight hatches you need to consider a couple of things, importantly Securing your gear to the boat Ensuring your dry gear stays dry 10' boats don't tend ...


3

It's reasonable to identify stages up to the start of shivering. But shortly after that judgement goes out the window. If you are traveling in a group, set up a buddy system. Each person has a buddy and you monitor the other party for symptoms. Look for the 'umbles. Fumbles -- fine motor coordination. Trouble with zippers. This can also be caused by ...


2

100% no. The best case scenario your going to get is an anal thermometer. You have to be pretty high up in management to use one of those on your self properly. Oral, infrared, or "stick on" thermometers are nearly useless unless you're trying to confirm a fever. Even then, they really only indicate "do something" and not an actual problem. Core temperature ...


2

Your question implies that having a radar reflecting hat is somehow going to prevent you getting hit by a large ship that is using radar. This is at best wishful thinking. In most cases human powered boats have the right of way, except in narrow channels. A vessel of less than 20 meters in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a ...


2

It's a very good question. I found an article that has some suggestions: Finally, it is important to consider your visibility on radar and at night. The best way to ensure that you are seen on radar is to use retro-reflective tape on your kayak, paddle blades, and PFD. I recommend putting 6inch long strips of Solas ® retro-reflective tape on both sides ...


1

Here is a suggestion, though somewhat wacky is perhaps more realistic than the "hat" idea. The page Sailing Safety Secrets - Are You 'Radar Visible' to Ships at Sea? says that the reflector should be as high as possible. For a boat with no masts, that can only be done by towing a kite, or a helium balloon. What should the reflector be? A tinfoil hat or ...


1

One simple check that I have used is to touch your thumb to your other fingers. If you can no longer touch your thumb to your pinkie finger (which usually is utterly trivial when warm) and if it is difficult or you can't do it at all, you should definitely think about warming up. I have gotten cold to the point that I couldn't, but it was at a base camp ...


1

Just wanted to second the comments above about keeping your gear dry. If it’s within your budget, good-quality drybags will be good for this and all future adventures. But extra-large ziplock bags, kitchen trash compactor bags, or just ordinary trash bags closed and handled carefully (put inside duffels to protect them from rocks etc) will work. Does your ...


1

One more piece of gear worth considering, if you plan to do solo trips or group trips in conditions that might separate the group, are inflatable sponsons—-long narrow inflatable tubes stowed compactly alongside the cockpit rim, secured in advance to the hull or rigging. You can inflate these in an emergency from inside or alongside your boat, making the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible