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22

I think there are several factors to consider when traveling alone. Pros You can set your own pace. For me this is one of the main reasons to hike alone. When with other people they often want to go faster than you and you end up breaking yourself trying to keep up or are slower/less confident and you have to slow down/not do those 'interesting' scrambles ...


9

Your most practical solution would seem to be a wing shelter. For the most part, you simply need your tarp, a tree, sticks and rope. The pdf I attached recommends making it 5 feet tall, but you could easily make it 2 or 3 feet tall to accommodate the length you need the shelter to be.


9

Pros: The ultimate freedom – from where to camp to pace, breaks or even where to go, it is all up to you There is a lot more room in the tent and you can spread your things everywhere No one makes stupid navigation errors and argues about it with you (unless it is you...) When you are camping, you can just read a book, or look at the sunset or just lay ...


9

The quick answer to a question of credible sources for solo trekking trails is, "NO", there are no sources which can be completely relied on for this kind of information (at least for the western ghats part). The following set of attributes might help you in deciding upon heading out solo in the western ghats: Safety: The western ghats are safe for ...


8

Determining whether it's a tick If you have a digital camera or mobile phone with you, you could try photographing your suspected tick. I don't have a tick handy for testing purposes, but I just tried a couple of close-up shots with my mid-range 2015 phone and it doesn't have any trouble imaging features well under a millimetre in size. A high-end phone or ...


6

OK, I finally tried the setup inspired by this site, which can be fully closed by pegging the sides closer to the middle, and pegging it directly on the ground on the opposite side of the entrance. It would be quite a tight night and you would need to leave your rucksack out, if it's big. But I was able to put the sleeping bag out of the bag from the ...


5

In general trekking/hiking is not very common in RSA and most of the possibilities will be maintained by the MCSA. I recommend that you get in contact with the Cape Town section of the MCSA and ask about longer hiking trips. Generally you have to consider that most land in RSA is private property and owners may not allow trespassing. But if the MCSA tells ...


4

Speed versus comfortable pace of life Kayaks are faster, if you actually have somewhere to go kayaks are the better option. If you want to watch the world go by with your dog sitting in the front then you want a canoe. Cargo Canoes are generally bigger, you can take more stuff. In a kayak you'll have to learn to pack light with mostly smaller items. Even ...


4

A kayak has the general advantage that with practice when tipped over one can roll back up. For this reason I'd say it's preferable. However, even with this advantage, if you're planning to go onto a lake far from the shore alone you will probably want to learn how to get yourself back into a boat if you do fall out and it fills with water, regardless of ...


2

A big part of this is "which canoe? which kayak" A long paddle in a white water kayak is a pain. They are slow. Ocean kayaks are much faster but are less than nimble to turn. I find the position in a kayak uncomfortable, and painful after about an hour or so. Canoes also come in whitewater versions, with a fair amount of rocker, and full bow and stern, ...


1

The second one is the better form. I have used that form, with the tall end in a spruce in both heavy rain and in snow, and stayed perfectly dry. However I didn't use a tarp as small as 1.4 x 2.4 m The one I used, I think was sold as an 8 x 10 foot tarp, but in fact was about 7.5 x 9.5 feet -- call it 2.4 x 3 meters. The first one is good for heavy dew ...


1

You could also have a look at the "Reflect Wedge" setup for the ALPKIT.COM Rig 3.5 Tarp in this PDF document on ALPKIT.COM. Although they show a bike and its wheel being used to support the tarp, you could of course so the same thing with trekking poles or similar. bearbonesbikepacking.blogspot.co.uk also has some examples of how you can setup the Rig 3.5 ...


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