65

There's an abandoned quarry near me where local kids used to jump off the topmost cliff edge, 100 feet up, every summer. When done properly it is survivable without injury. You have to break the surface tension with a part of your body that can take the blow, and you have to keep all your muscles clenched and your body absolutely rigid, and you have to hit ...


19

Feet first is always best - you might break your legs if you hit the bottom, but at least you won't break your back, neck, or be knocked unconscious - all of which can kill you, either through the damage to the spine or through drowning. I would aim to jump in angled away from the cliff (i.e. body not totally vertical), arms across chest or covering mouth/...


11

Well, first thing first, 100' (30 metre) is likely not to end well for you. So really the question stops being valid way before that. Second, if you've ever spent anytime diving and had the pleasure of a bellyflop, you know you don't want to put yourself into any kind of uncontrolled tumble, and that means minimizing your rotation from your starting ...


5

Feet first. This has been well covered in other answers. Keep your body nice and straight, use your abs to support yourself, point your toes. All the things that competitive divers do to make less splash will also make your entry into the water easier. Take a deep breath, you will need it (about 2.5 seconds of fall time, plus however long it takes you to ...


2

The New Yorker has an interesting and sad article on people jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. According to the article: The rare survivors always hit feet first, and at a slight angle.


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