74

There's an abandoned quarry near me where local kids used to jump off the topmost cliff edge, 100 feet up, every summer. When done properly it is survivable without injury. You have to break the surface tension with a part of your body that can take the blow, and you have to keep all your muscles clenched and your body absolutely rigid, and you have to hit ...


29

Even though the question describes a hypothetical and unlikely situation I think it has some merits as it is somewhat relevant for SCUBA diving also: it describes an emergency uncontrolled SCUBA ascent (swimming or buoyant). Note that the answer below assumes an absolute emergency only that requires an immediate no-air ascent. As in, you either reach the ...


23

First and foremost: Don't Panic At 30m, you'll be fine if you can free yourself within about 20 minutes and know what you're doing. That being said, there is a good chance you won't know your exact depth, so the sooner the better is going to be your guiding principle. (At 40m, your time drops to 8 minutes. At 20m, you have 45 minutes.) PADI and NAUI both ...


21

Feet first is always best - you might break your legs if you hit the bottom, but at least you won't break your back, neck, or be knocked unconscious - all of which can kill you, either through the damage to the spine or through drowning. I would aim to jump in angled away from the cliff (i.e. body not totally vertical), arms across chest or covering mouth/...


15

I think that list is talking about immediate priorities, that is, what you must focus on first to stay alive in a survival situation, not whether food is necessary. From Backcountry Chronicles, the article Wilderness Survival Rules of 3 – Air, Shelter, Water and Food lists four of the rules like this Survival Rule of 3 and Survival Priorities For ...


13

Well, first thing first, 100' (30 metre) is likely not to end well for you. So really the question stops being valid way before that. Second, if you've ever spent anytime diving and had the pleasure of a bellyflop, you know you don't want to put yourself into any kind of uncontrolled tumble, and that means minimizing your rotation from your starting ...


9

Personally, I usually take neither. Instead, I bring a sturdy knife and a saw. The knife wouldn't be replaced by hatchet or axe: it is anyways needed for cooking and it is at least as good as a hatchet/axe to make kindling (if I cannot collect that directly, anyways). The saw weighs less than a hatchet and sawing is more efficient than cutting by axe for all ...


9

Escaping a sunken ship or submarine has some similarities to an emergency ascent in the course of SCUBA diving, but it's not identical to it. First the differences: You don't have fins. Without fins, you cannot swim as fast and as efficiently. Fins allow you to limit oxygen consumption by using efficiency-optimized leg muscles. Swimming with arms and feet ...


8

I think there are simply not that many uses for nails in emergency situations. Using nails as intended: If you want to build shelter or other wooden constructions you would need a lot of nails - which are heavy. Hammering in nails with a rock is rather annoying - and you're not planning to bring a 500g hammer, are you? In any case, for shelter and tool ...


8

When you say "trapped" I presume you mean he cannot find his way out, as opposed to being trapped by rock fall or something blocking his exit such as flooding? The only weather-related clues could be when reaching to very near an entrance where the temperature can change. Caves tend to be at a fairly constant temperature (around the average for the location)...


8

TL;DR: Death trap? No. Should you be cautious? At least as cautious as you would be with normal tinder. Think of it this way: Pile of loose jute twine, seem dangerous? No. People who use it for arts & crafts probably don't even realize its fire potential. Pile of loose paracord. Dangerous? No. Tinder can sit out without worry. Paracord can sit out ...


8

Even the “regular” paracord would be set ablaze if you put it close to a fire / heat source :) It’s a nylon / polyester after all… In my opinion, such gimmick paracords are not more dangerous than a normal one. Unless that tinder is a strand of black powder fuse :) UPDATE I reckon that extra strand is some kind of waxed cotton or something. If that is the ...


7

The danger is not only suffocation due to lack of oxygen, but also poisoning due to too much carbon dioxide in the air. Normal air has 21% oxygen; humans will safely survive down to ~15%. Maybe 10% oxygen is barely survivable for a few hours. Mountaineers might have an advantage here, they regularly survive Everest, which has ⅓ of the oxygen at sea level ...


7

is there any evidence to suggest that de-prioritizing food increases survival Anyone who has ever prioritized food and died of any of the other issues would be evidence that de-prioritizing food would have increased survival. If someone spends a couple days setting traps, snares, and fishing lines only to realize they still don't know how to get fresh ...


7

This sounds to me like a bad idea because you don't want to go into the hike already a little dehydrated. My recommendation would be to go into the hike very well hydrated, and to drink a lot of fluids during the hike, and don't forget about electrolytes.


7

I'm assuming for this answer that you are based in the USA, and have read the recent NY times article on "Murder Hornets" Like most wasp species, you are at little risk unless you are disturbing its nest or happen to accidentally cause it to think it is being attacked (e.g. it lands on your side without you knowing and you lower your arm onto it). ...


6

Feet first. This has been well covered in other answers. Keep your body nice and straight, use your abs to support yourself, point your toes. All the things that competitive divers do to make less splash will also make your entry into the water easier. Take a deep breath, you will need it (about 2.5 seconds of fall time, plus however long it takes you to ...


6

I have served in an Army that tried that, “water discipline” was used to try and make soldiers get used to using less water. It failed miserably, people have died or got seriously hurt and there was no visible benefit and the habit was abounded


5

Caves breathe. As the outside pressure increases or decreases the air inside a cave has to equalize. The most common cause is a pressure change is when the the outside temp changes due to the sun rising or setting. A front will also affect this. The larger the cave, the more air will go in & out. The air will feel like a wind. This is more noticeable ...


5

From your heading I gather the mountain in your story is covered in snow. If the slope allows it, then I'd skid down on my behind. Grab something like a suitably formed stone to be able to perform a self-arrest. Any kind of skis you could expect to build up there would perform far worse.


4

As it is the questions you have are unanswerable - Is it on a permanent snow covered mountain, or seasonal? how deep snow? how high mountain (tree-line)? How isolated? Do you know where you are or not? Daylight hour length? What supplies/gear do you have? How bad are the injuries? Do you have a first aid kit (comprehensive or not)? Where in the world are you?...


3

The technique @helm recommends is (at least in this neck of the woods) called a "Glissade". It is essentially "a method of descending a steep snow-covered slope via a controlled slide on one's feet or buttocks". I have heard of people using other items to assist in a glissade by using them as a sort of sled, a backpack or as in Ed Abbey's Desert Solitaire; a ...


3

There are lots of options - the most popular seem to be rotting fish and chicken parts. In a pinch, dog or cat food seems to also work though it's not quite as effective as the alternatives. The general rule is the smellier the better. You can also try a variety of crab attractants which are made from concentrated fish parts and are extremely smelly. They ...


3

There are many references available on the internet regarding consumption of ash from untreated wood. The practice apparently dates into prehistory. However, as a few people have pointed out, the intent was not to use the ash as a food but as a food modifier. My own research shows four main uses: as a leavening agent, both in Europe and in North America ...


3

I have heard that if you drink a lot of water as a habit, the body doesn't do much retention. That just means that your body will not retain excessive water. Therefore, if you are preparing for a hiking in the desert where not much water will be available, is lowering the water intake a few days before the hike a better approach to deal with the ...


2

Water preparation on desert hiking? It is almost impossible to training the body for hacking or trekking in the desert, especially if one is not use to it. Heat acclimatization seems to be a much more beneficial way to prepare for the desert than what you are speculating would a good way to prepare: ”Lowering the water intake a few days before the hike a ...


2

The New Yorker has an interesting and sad article on people jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. According to the article: The rare survivors always hit feet first, and at a slight angle.


2

The choice between ax and hatchet is a trade-off between weight and utility. Axes are heavier to carry, but easier, safer and more efficient to use. Hatchets are lighter-weight, but more dangerous and more tiring to use. My advice is to make the decision based on how far you will have to carry the tool. If you are car camping (IE camping within a short ...


1

XY-question frame challenge. The only way to win the game is to not play. If you were to be jumping in, then the other answers give insightful food for thought. But that's a huge, colossal if, especially given your use case. So here comes the party-pooper... As long as you are even moderately well prepared I would be willing to bet a lot of money that the ...


1

If I was considering nails for my survival kit, I think I would probably upgrade to a hand drill instead. Metal nails are use once and gone, a drill and a knife will make an unlimited supply of holes and wood fasteners. Keep in mind survival is either short term stationary or it is mobile. Anything you have to leave at the last campsite, does not ...


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