29

Even though the question describes a hypothetical and unlikely situation I think it has some merits as it is somewhat relevant for SCUBA diving also: it describes an emergency uncontrolled SCUBA ascent (swimming or buoyant). Note that the answer below assumes an absolute emergency only that requires an immediate no-air ascent. As in, you either reach the ...


24

Theoretically, it might be possible to survive on fish, rainwater and desalinated seawater. In one 1930 experiment, two men survived for a year eating exclusively meat without experiencing any health issues. This indirectly suggests that meat (and therefore possibly also fish) contain all the essential nutrients, but this was a small and relatively short ...


23

First and foremost: Don't Panic At 30m, you'll be fine if you can free yourself within about 20 minutes and know what you're doing. That being said, there is a good chance you won't know your exact depth, so the sooner the better is going to be your guiding principle. (At 40m, your time drops to 8 minutes. At 20m, you have 45 minutes.) PADI and NAUI both ...


20

Summary: eat the rabbit. Every single bit of it. With 1 rabbit per day, you are in starvation while probably not exceeding your normal capacity for daily protein digestion, though it may very well exceed the protein digestion capacity if you are in total starvation (also without protein) for a prolonged amount of time. In any case, you should stretch it ...


17

You can, of course, use the skin for some (minimal) clothing - furs are nice and warm. You could also use the animal as bait (living or dead) to attract larger animals (bigger skins) or for fishing. You could also boil the meat and skin to extract the fat components, which then could be consumed in a broth/soup. Marrow from the bones is very nutritious, ...


15

I think that list is talking about immediate priorities, that is, what you must focus on first to stay alive in a survival situation, not whether food is necessary. From Backcountry Chronicles, the article Wilderness Survival Rules of 3 – Air, Shelter, Water and Food lists four of the rules like this Survival Rule of 3 and Survival Priorities For ...


14

... can someone gather/hunt/farm all of the nutrients required to be healthy whilst never having to land again? Nutrients yes, healthy not likely. A 1000 days is a grueling journey. Reid Stowe, whom used to have a website called (Beyond) 1000 Days at Sea: The Mars Ocean Odyssey, lived at sea (without contact with land) for 1,152 days (equals 3 Years, 1 ...


12

Assuming you have no way of safely and reliably leaving the cave to get help, your first priority is not to become a casualty yourself as well. Even if the Guide needs urgent medical attention, it would take an appreciable amount of time for the first members of the cave rescue team to arrive on site and then to locate you and the Guide in the cave, so ...


11

Because swimming takes energy that your body could be using for heat and instead uses it for movement. The more energy you use in cold water, the more your body cools off. If you cannot climb out of the water, conserve body heat by remaining as still as possible and reducing the amount of your body exposed to the water. Protect your critical heat loss ...


10

In my experience, it comes down to 4 things. Wilderness First Responder Certification: The first course is 80 hours and then you need to recertify after 2 years. There are other certifications such as a Wilderness EMT but this is pretty much the standard. Organization specific instructor course: When you become an instructor for an organization you usually ...


9

Escaping a sunken ship or submarine has some similarities to an emergency ascent in the course of SCUBA diving, but it's not identical to it. First the differences: You don't have fins. Without fins, you cannot swim as fast and as efficiently. Fins allow you to limit oxygen consumption by using efficiency-optimized leg muscles. Swimming with arms and feet ...


8

Even the “regular” paracord would be set ablaze if you put it close to a fire / heat source :) It’s a nylon / polyester after all… In my opinion, such gimmick paracords are not more dangerous than a normal one. Unless that tinder is a strand of black powder fuse :) UPDATE I reckon that extra strand is some kind of waxed cotton or something. If that is the ...


8

TL;DR: Death trap? No. Should you be cautious? At least as cautious as you would be with normal tinder. Think of it this way: Pile of loose jute twine, seem dangerous? No. People who use it for arts & crafts probably don't even realize its fire potential. Pile of loose paracord. Dangerous? No. Tinder can sit out without worry. Paracord can sit out ...


8

When you say "trapped" I presume you mean he cannot find his way out, as opposed to being trapped by rock fall or something blocking his exit such as flooding? The only weather-related clues could be when reaching to very near an entrance where the temperature can change. Caves tend to be at a fairly constant temperature (around the average for the location)...


8

I think there are simply not that many uses for nails in emergency situations. Using nails as intended: If you want to build shelter or other wooden constructions you would need a lot of nails - which are heavy. Hammering in nails with a rock is rather annoying - and you're not planning to bring a 500g hammer, are you? In any case, for shelter and tool ...


7

The danger is not only suffocation due to lack of oxygen, but also poisoning due to too much carbon dioxide in the air. Normal air has 21% oxygen; humans will safely survive down to ~15%. Maybe 10% oxygen is barely survivable for a few hours. Mountaineers might have an advantage here, they regularly survive Everest, which has ⅓ of the oxygen at sea level ...


7

is there any evidence to suggest that de-prioritizing food increases survival Anyone who has ever prioritized food and died of any of the other issues would be evidence that de-prioritizing food would have increased survival. If someone spends a couple days setting traps, snares, and fishing lines only to realize they still don't know how to get fresh ...


7

This sounds to me like a bad idea because you don't want to go into the hike already a little dehydrated. My recommendation would be to go into the hike very well hydrated, and to drink a lot of fluids during the hike, and don't forget about electrolytes.


6

Although I checked your link, I am not sure how exactly you would personally use a salt lick (based on the images from the mineral lick wiki article). There might be certain signs that can give away a salty environment: plants that thrive in a such a place, dried edges of water streams/ponds where the salt becomes visible (the ground is covered with a thin ...


6

From how it sounds, the river is too deep to walk through. I strongly advise against trying to swim through it in winter - if you are not well trained, well equipped and know the river very well, this is very likely deadly. Also, I advise against using some makeshift equipment or a blow-up raft. The river will likely become deadly after an earthquake strong ...


6

I have served in an Army that tried that, “water discipline” was used to try and make soldiers get used to using less water. It failed miserably, people have died or got seriously hurt and there was no visible benefit and the habit was abounded


5

A vivid description of this is described in "Young Men & Fire" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Young_Men_and_Fire Early 50's Forest service is developing smoke jumpers. At the time teams didn't train together as a team. They drop into the Mann Gulch fire, above it. Their plan was to come down the gulch opposite the fire, cross over and fight it from ...


5

This is a photo of Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum). It can grow extremely dense in some locations. People don't usually choose to swim where this and other plants grow very dense, but if they do, they are most at risk from entanglement if they panic. I work professionally on aquatic plant management, and also am an avid lake swimmer.


5

Here's an article about the Iroquois long house: https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/longhouse Woodland Cree made log cabins, generally with shed roofs covered in layers of poles, dirt, and bark. Cherokee also were cabin builders. Inuit made skin tents over pits for summer use. The teepee was only used on the plains AFAIK. The building in ...


5

From your heading I gather the mountain in your story is covered in snow. If the slope allows it, then I'd skid down on my behind. Grab something like a suitably formed stone to be able to perform a self-arrest. Any kind of skis you could expect to build up there would perform far worse.


5

Caves breathe. As the outside pressure increases or decreases the air inside a cave has to equalize. The most common cause is a pressure change is when the the outside temp changes due to the sun rising or setting. A front will also affect this. The larger the cave, the more air will go in & out. The air will feel like a wind. This is more noticeable ...


4

A great starting point would be to undergo an intensive program in outdoor skills and leadership. In Canada there is COLT -- Canadian Outdoor Leadership Training. COLT is 100 days long and covers camping, open canoeing, whitewater kayaking, sea kayaking, hiking, rock climbing, mountaineering, and wilderness first aid. In the US, and in many other countries,...


4

I like the answer of @Charlie Brumbaugh, and it would be hard to do better as an official answer, but I would like to add the perspective of one category of prospective client: The older, highly experienced but still healthy backpacker who now needs help with carrying stuff (Sherpa help -- I hope that does not minimize the important role Sherpas play on ...


4

Smoke contains phenols which are antioxidants, and anti-microbial. This reduces fat going rancid, and bacterial growth on the surface. Smoke also contains formaldehyde, poisonous to bacteria and people alike. Don't make a steady diet of the top millimeter of smoked food. Organic acids (like acetic) lower the pH further making life as a bacteria difficult. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible