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9

Taking a literal definition of US and not restricting the answer to the continental US, there is a mangrove swap on Heeia in HI and the list of reptiles in HI does not include crocodiles or alligators. There are also 9 mangrove areas in Puerto Rico and the list of reptiles in PR does not include alligators or crocodiles (although I found some conflicting ...


9

There isn't really a safe way to do this. The problem is that you have no way to tell how deep the water/mud ahead of you is and there is always the risk of getting entangled in submerged holes, branches or other obstructions, plus marshes tend to have viscous mud or silt at the bottom whcih can suck at your feet making walking tiring and greatly increases ...


7

A big risk is falling into a stump hole. They can be hard to get out of on dry land, much less while submerged. Carry a stout stick and feel the ground ahead very forcefully. Waders should protect you from hypothermia just fine. After those risks, I would consider critters. Mosquitos love bogs and carry all sorts of nasty illnesses. Water snakes will ...


7

Mangroves no, because if you compare this map of the distribution of mangroves to this map of the distribution of alligators in the United States, Image Source there aren't any places with mangroves that don't also have alligators. On the other hand, there are places on this map of cypress swamps that extend farther north than the range of alligators. ...


6

I would say that the risks would be fairly significant, due to how things are going to be fairly flat and the banks wills have lots of vegetation, both of which will limit the amount of distance you can see. Also, in any areas like that, things will start to look the same after a while. The tricks I would recommend for avoiding getting lost are, Stop and ...


5

You have a leg up as far as canoeing experience is concerned, but there's a definite risk of getting lost, especially the first time you're doing swamp canoeing. The terrain is different from other types of waters you've traveled, but according to my friends who have done swamp canoeing, there are things that you can do, both before you go, and during your ...


5

I see that Charlie has already shown that there may be a few cypress swamps that don't have alligators if you go far enough north and inland. However, being in a canoe gives you considerable protection. Alligators aren't going to attack the canoe somehow. In the unlikely event that one will get curious and come too close for your comfort, you have paddles ...


4

It seems to me that a canoe would be the most pleasant way to navigate/explore a swampy/boggy area. Canoes typically have a shallow draft allowing you to explore areas with minimal water depth. They will also help you avoid inadvertently falling into a hole and getting a foot/ankle/leg trapped. You will have extra space to carry more supplies, and in a pinch ...


3

Alligators won't bother you. They will chill out on the floor of the water feature in question and patiently wait for you to pass by. I've skied on the Mississippi River before, as well as in other riverine regions in the South, and have as such spent considerable time bobbing in the water, waiting for the boat to circle back and pick me up. I've also spent ...


2

I'm reiterating and expanding on highlights from other answers and adding a cautionary anecdote. First off, as noted in a comment, please confirm with local environmental protection agencies if you are permitted to enter these bogs. Regardless of their answer, know that these are inherently quite sensitive environments and your wading will disturb them. ...


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