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18

Moose–Vehicle Collisions From Fatal Car to Moose Collisions: In Sweden, the number of moose vehicle collisions (MVCs) were 5874 in 2016 (Nationella Viltolycksrådet 2015). During the last 10 years in average 5 [human] fatalities occur annually due to MVCs in Sweden. To put this in proportion, see Sweden Sverige (emphasis added): There are approximately 350,...


12

Some considerations I can think of: Legality As long as it is not a nature reserve or a military restricted area, it should be allowed. You could probably check with some authority if it applies to the smaller islands as well. I would just try to contact Naturvårdsverket or Gothenburgs tourist agency. Safety Since its in the blatic sea, tides aren´t that ...


9

Protected species in sweden are listed in English here: Protected Species in Sweden. Since information is subject to change I will not copy the information into this answer. Apart from that, hunting and fishing is regulated. Naturally, anything grown commercially is off limits too, since that is the property of the land owner. Note that National Parks/...


8

Hunting with bow is not allowed in Sweden, but a bow does not require a license, and the Swedish law for the nature ("allemandsretten") is very liberal, so I guess it is ok shoot at targets, when not near any people. The Swedish weapons guide (in Swedish, sorry) https://polisen.se/Global/www%20och%20Intrapolis/FAP/FAP551_3_RPSFS2009_13.pdf Bows A ...


7

In the more densely populated areas of Central Europe these long distance trails just seamlessly blend in with regional or local trails, so while the whole, say, 2690 km of the EB Eisenach - Budapest may not be well-known, e.g. its westernmost 170 km is the Rennsteig, a very famous regional trail in Germany which is moreover very old: it used to be a ...


7

The easiest is to take the routes that many people take, because on those routes, social trails have formed and you may find help if you are in trouble. 5–7 days is too short. Although you can get through quickly if you take take the route from Tjåmotis into Aktse and you might make it to Akkastugorna in 5 days, I would not recommend it. You should take ...


6

Well, it seems that the mystery was solved: it is a common roach with a guanin deficiency that causes them to have a different colour, as explained by this ecologist (in Swedish).


5

You have actually quoted the right answer already. I missed it the first time I read your post. same­[-]byns gemensamma kassa This means collective funds of the Sami village (My translation, check google for a laugh).


5

This comes from more of a personal experience side of things, rather than a statistics point of view. See the other answers if you are looking for the actual numbers. Being a Swede, and telling just from the number of people I know have hit moose with a car, that figure might very well be correct. Moose are very common in Sweden (seeing as the country is ...


4

To address the follow-up, Sweden has four species of large carnivore: wolf, wolverine, brown bear and lynx. The first three are all willing to scavenge, as are some birds, and of course humans (plenty of people eat fresh roadkill). In other countries large roadkill is used as food for bears and zoo animals, though I can't find a solid source for Sweden. ...


4

Here comes my variant of the trekking route which I've recently done without any problems. Starting point is Kvikkjokk, the end is in Saltoluokta. Day 1. Kvikkjokk - Pårte. Day 2. Pårte - Aktse. You'll have to cross Laitaure lake to get to Aktse. There are rowing boats at any time or a motor boat twice a day. If you want to take a motor boat you'll need ...


4

I think a better translation would make the meaning obvious. "Kassa" here means "fund". ie a "kassakåta" is a hut funded by the village, not by an individual or a family.


4

The Scandinavian mountains reach from Stavanger in the south to the North Cape in the north. You can easily explore where mountainous areas are via the interactive topographic maps of Norway and Sweden. Southern Norway is geographically closest, but is less well connected, with only few trains connecting Malmö with Oslo. You might find that it's just as ...


4

Abisko is kind of unique in Sweden, with it’s accessible alpine setting. (It’s a long journey no doubt, but not complicated thanks to sleeper trains) The areas of Kebnekaise and Sarek have a similar feeling, but takes even longer to get to, even if slightly more south. Then you have the area between Hemavan and Ammarnäs. Still further south but not ...


3

I'd say borders are the main reason such trails aren't famous. Well nowadays with free movement within EU, borders aren't an issue. But that is just quite recent history. Also lack of common language can discourage people from hiking across country borders. Before Euro also lack of common currency. Individual countries themselves are not that big (compared ...


2

The brightly coloured stuff pictured was probably sold for the purpose, unless it was painted for the players to use. The most readily available material in the UK (and other bits of Europe I know, but the only time I've been to Sweden was 30 years ago) is guttering, as used to collect rainwater falling off roofs. This should be available from most places ...


2

I'll gladly answer, as I have trekked Sarek before in 2010, and also have months of experience on Kungsleden/Nordkalottleden/Padjelantaleden and various other trails in the region. On helicopter flights I cannot personally condone helicopter flights for anything where they are not absolutely needed. They are loud and ecologically wasteful and they seem to be ...


2

Here is some food for thought: Autumn is the time to come and enjoy the fruits of nature’s labour. During August and September, the forests burst to life with berries, edible wild mushrooms (chanterelles and porcini), and local plants and herbs that are just ripe for the picking. A Swedish law called Allemansrätten ("every man's right"), means that anyone ...


2

Not nearly enough - don't rely on it. You might find blueberries in the parts of the trail that is below approx. 200m above sea level and certainly you will come upon patches of ripe cloudberries as high as perhaps 600m hillsides facing south but that will not be enough to sustain you. There are some edible roots and shoots - also reindeer moss - but you ...


1

I was about to write a long essay on how strange the Norwegian rules regarding rights-of-every-man and the department of safety and readiness but I realized you are just asking where to find the information. This is usually not a judgement that is made at the nation level - it is made by each municipality or city council. So you'll normally expect to find ...


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