Hot answers tagged

6

Yes there is, but the situation being described is probably not exactly that. If we consider a standard sailboat with a headsail and mainsail, as the boat turns into the wind the wind pressure on the headsail tries to push the front of the boat away from the wind. As the prow turns across the wind, i.e. through the point where the boat points direct upwind, ...


5

The text implies differences in the ships. Once settled on the new tack the Loire’s natural advantages asserted themselves once more. She showed her extra speed and extra weatherliness; Hotspur: Smaller (he's running not fighting), slower in a straight line, but quicker to tack Loire: Bigger and faster on the straight but slower to tack, possibly able to ...


5

I hope you like a non-answer. There rarely ever is a theoretically optimal time to tack that can be described in the abstract, as there are so many unknown, random variables. The best time to tack, for pure speed, is never. But never isn't a practical answer, as you usually have an ultimate destination or things to avoid, and the wind isn't constant, so you ...


3

Forester provides the answer earlier in the text Assuming a steady wind speed and direction, no obstacles to avoid, and progress to windward not in excess of that needed to make one's destination on the opposite tack, there is no such thing as an optimal moment to tack. In the passage cited, however, the obstacle is the pursuing vessel. That French ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible