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10

In the picture given: The brown spot beneath the arm is a gut shot. If sitting just like this you'd have to shoot through the arm for a chest shot (and waste most of that meat). In general: Rifle hunting (.22) just shoot for the head. The head is just as big as the chest target area and damages the meat less. Generally though squirrels are not very ...


9

Often times it makes sense to ask the locals by asking at gun shops or outdoor gear shops like for example Sportsman's Warehouse or Cabela's. The other good resource would be the managers of public land in the area, sometimes the BLM or Forest service will have designated areas and sometimes areas will be closed to shooting during certain times of the year....


8

There are a number of aspects you need to train for shooting a gun. The specific scenario you are training for will change your choice of gear and approach. I have trained a number of people for defensive style shooting, such as that found in IDPA or IPSC competitions, or for concealed carry purposes. For indoor training, I use SIRT pistols from Next ...


6

Having actually hunted and killed squirrels for food before, if you're planning on keeping the meat, then you don't want to shoot it in the body, shoot it in the head. A squirrels head is just as big as it's kill zone, if you shoot for the body you'll likely damage the precious meager morsels. One squirrel isn't enough food for one person to begin with, so ...


6

My point of view will come from training for competition (eg, Olympics) since that is what I did. You won't find any non-cartridge BB/pellet gun that will simulate real recoil so I wouldn't bother. The closest would be the spring piston ones that were in use before CO2 and compressed air took over such as the Feinwerkbau 300 or RWS 75. I'm sure there were ...


4

You could visit your local police department and ask if they can recommend a public range. This is somewhat more likely to get you a range that caters to handguns than rifles, but it's worth a try.


4

As most of my experience is in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire, this answer may be biased towards that location. I typically try to find promising places within the national forest with satellite and topographic maps, then drive to the place to actually scout it out. A promising place would be a clearing or a sandpit, at least a mile ...


4

Despite what the extremely smart and dedicate (and if I say so myself good looking) individuals in the US military say is the maximum safe exposure, more noise reduction is always better to the extent that it does not hamper situational awareness or impact operational readiness. As a recreational shooter, this means more is better. The big issue is that in ...


3

Most of these I have experience with the supporting arms are the weak point - hit them and they bend, making it hard to take the target apart for storage, keeping the target from spinning/flipping, etc. A spring loaded "popper" style target may work better/longer without issues. Alternatively, a hanging target and have it hung from (small) chains. I've ...


3

Currently, the lightest arrows I can find are 5 grains per inch of arrow, plus a few for the head, knock and feathers. You are looking at about 150 to 160 grains for the lightest 28 inch draw arrows. If you want lighter arrows fired from a normal draw bow, the Turkish use a "Majra" to fire short arrows from standard length bows. With one of those you ...


3

It is important to match your intended shooting height to the bipod that you select. Additionally, the longer that you are shooting the more stable the attachment between the rifle and the bipod need to be. Additionally to properly load up the bipod you want feet that will grip the surface that you are on instead of allowing the bipod to walk forward.


2

Aside from the durability issue @ivanivan mentioned, if you hit the "stem" that is common to nearly all spinners, you might take that as a hit when in fact it was a miss. You should also look at Champion Target's Duraseal series, which are a bit more environmentally friendly as there is no lead splatter/dust. Of course, they will eventually need replacing ...


2

Often, public versions of these ranges are also operated/regulated by the same agency that regulates hunting/fishing/game harvest in the area. When I moved from Alaska to Michigan, I found that while Michigan only has a few public shooting ranges operated by the state (5 perhaps?, and none in my area), they do provide a listing of private shooting ranges in ...


2

You can shoot an arrow from a bow that is so light as to cause damage to the bow! There needs to be some resistance/weight in the projectile or you will be - in effect - dry firing your bow, which is at least a very bad idea and in most cases very damaging if not catastrophically damaging to your weapon. Flight bows and arrows are, for the most part, ...


2

Well if you're Daniel Boone or Davy Crockett you'd aim for the little stump the squirrel is sitting on and bark the squirrel1: As the reader may imagine a squirrel hit by a rifle ball would be torn to pieces, so that neither its flesh nor its fur could be of any service. In order to secure the animals intact, the backwoodsmen resorted to a skilful ...


2

The weight of the arrow depends on the material used to make it. First let’s understand that you pick an arrow based on the weight of the bow (poundage) and the archer’s draw length. That will give the spine (group) of the arrow you should be using. There are ways to play with spine... longer arrows, heavier points, etc but let’s forget this for now and ...


2

You are comparing apples to oranges here. You can have a much much higher pull weight on a crossbow, simply because it is easier and you can use mechanical advantage. If you look at history, the advantages of a crossbow is that the archers didn't need to have the same amount of physical strength required to pull a long bow. For example, That said, most ...


1

I recently ran into a mention of the Coolfire system: https://coolfiretrainer.com/ My understanding of it is that it attaches to a real gun and simulates recoil. I have no experience with it. There are also cameras that attach to a gun and record what happens when you pull the trigger.


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