9

Basically all answers boil down to the availability of anchors. If there is any fixed anchors like bolts, rapelling would be your best choice. You would have the weight of a harness and a carabiner for a munter hitch (probably 200-250 grams plus the rope). It is possible to rappel from accessory cord but this is likely out of specification. If there is no ...


5

I think it is important between position and turning technique. I am going to focus on the position you want to have while going straight, without actively breaking, accelerating or turning - i.e. a "neutral" or "basic" position. First of all I agree with @Gabriel C. that you should have an active stance. For me this means having body tension, but not being ...


4

In short: Yes this has happened, and so it is a realistic concern. It's not common, but I have heard of it happening (usually resulting in a small finger scrape, not degloving). People in this reddit thread say they've seen it happen. To illustrate the danger, try it. Put your pointer finger in between the gate and edge of a carabiner at home and pull it ...


3

What is the basic position? The basic position seems to be simple yet effective stance to help with various aspects of skiing. The Mechanics of Sport stance page explains the aspects that were described above: "Bend knees and hips": Be able to absorb bumps through the legs and allow the body to flex. This means that the knees must be bent, as well as ...


3

From what you describe as being taught, the basic position seems to align with the concept of being relaxed and in an active stance as opposed to being stiff and static. This makes it so you can respond to changes like bumps and ridges more adquately and in turn retain more control than if you were being jolted around and unable to absorb stresses in flexed ...


3

You're gripping the handle too high. I know the problem you are describing from a similar situation arising in HEMA (historical european martial arts) sword fighting. There I use a Viking Spatha, the handle of which can look similar to what your machete looks like. And I actually had to fight with blisters at the very same spot you're describing in the past....


3

As there's ample anecdotal evidence, bad things can happen when doing this. There's also ample anecdotal evidence, that bad things will likely not happen. When bad things happen, scratches and even more rarely degloving is mentioned. I can reproduce scratches with placing my finger really badly below the opened gate. And sure, if I can avoid scratches, I'd ...


1

2-3 m is a nice short distance. A technique I've used only once is having two cams on two doubles (a double is a double-length runner that would normally go from the protection to the rope). Put first cam it at the top. Climb down until you can barely reach it, put second cam in, take first cam out, climb down some more. About three leapfrogs and you're ...


1

I don't think it is possible to explain how to do this in words. Peilonrayz makes a good crack at it, but even as a skier I get confused by this. It's like trying to tell someone how to tie their shoes. The following applies to any physical skill. "Show me" is far better than "Tell me" Search for downhill skiing tutorial on youtube. Watching a new ...


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