64

Use a pencil. They do not freeze and can be easily sharpened. You might also use a grease pencil; they can write on metal, plastic, wet, oily, or waxy surfaces as well. These don't always afford the finest points, so if this is a concern, consider a fine-tipped sharpie, but, Sharpies are still susceptible to cold and wet weather. EDIT: Now that you've ...


44

I have previously used a tape recorder and nowadays, a smartphone or tiny handheld microphone. Then I simply speak my observations and findings in a way I know I will be able to easily tabulate when I am inside once again. If it is too windy to use an outer microphone, usually putting it below clothing layers will do fine. If it's muffled, I later boost the ...


41

To address the issues you're having with audio-based solutions, keep the phone inside your clothing and use a "hands-free" headset (wired). This will stop the phone dying due to a cold battery, which incidentally I've never had trouble with on a range of Android phones. With the right software you should be able to record when the microphone button on the ...


27

When I was hunting, I found that the best way to keep my fingers warm, while still allowing me to free them for delicate manipulation (loading a magazine, etc) was to wear "convertible gloves" - that is, fingerless gloves with a mitten pouch that could be slipped over your fingers when not writing. Additionally, adding a chemical hand-warmer to the mitten ...


21

Prepare a form for the information you collect. Make the blanks big. Fill in the form by grasping your "pencil" in your gloved fist. Use an over-sized writing utensil (so your fist doesn't cramp). Revert to bare fingers when necessary. Blanks for numbers are easy. So are checkboxes. If there is text you need to write, try to create options ahead of ...


20

When I worked at a salebarn in the winter we had this problem and the solution was multiple pens inside your shirt pocket under your coat. Pens will work for a while then get too cold at which point you switch it out for a new warm one. You might also look into the mittens that have gloved fingers inside, you can pull just the top off to write while most ...


17

One time, during a winter research project, it was only after after a full-day ski to the study site that we realized that none of us had a pen or pencil. So we wrote the numbers in the snow with a twig and took a picture. I realize this doesn't directly answer your question, but it made for an entertaining story.


17

Think of the basic triangle - you need warmth, dryness, and wind-free. OP's question does not mention being wet but does reference the cold AND the windchill. So limit the wind with some kind of windproof shield. Here's a generic "outdoor clipboard". So the plastic lid keeps rain off, but will also act as a wind shield. It will not really act to hold ...


15

Of course. You can (almost) always cool down a 4-season tent, but you can't very well protect a 2-season tent from a blizzard. The primary concern is weight, but if you're going to be camping near a glacier with -5°C winds, you'll want a sturdy tent, so that's going to come at a certain cost of weight. To keep a tent cooler, you can pitch it in the ...


15

The temperature within the cave is almost constant whatever the current surface temperature is. Once well away from surface influences, i.e., not near an entrance or another close connection to the surface, where air movements can influence the temperature, caves are usually at the same temperature (or very close) as the annual average temperature for the ...


14

-10C (14F) is not that cold. If you keep moving a thin "glove liner" or "running glove" should be warm enough for a while. The glove liners are thin enough where a regular #2 pencil will do fine. Then put on a pair of "Over Mitts" over the liners when you don't need to write. You're using a waterproof field notes book, right? You're using dot tally to ...


13

Pencils. Pencils are also approved by the Bundesmarine (German Navy). I remember how pencils just worked when we stood outside in the rain and in the snow at temperatures around 0°C, and us recruits practicing morse codes. Unfortunately I have no other quotation for this, except myself (Signalbetriebsdienst class of Winter/2004 at Bremerhaven). Paper was ...


13

Most answers seem to assume the writing implement is the problem, but the asker specifically states that his comfort is the problem. I can think of two solutions. If possible, figure out how to simplify your inventory. Consider writing in ways that don't require a large amount of dexterity -- I would consider tally marks. If you need more detailed notes, ...


12

There is no such place. 40-60°F is a very narrow range. 20°F can be just from day and night variation, which leaves basically nothing for seasonal variation. Even if you meant daytime highs, I still don't think there is any place on earth that fits this description, let alone anywhere in the US. Let's flip this around and think of what would make ...


12

There are some pens that are made for extreme conditions such as the uni-ball PowerTank Retractable Ballpoint pen. I've never personally used one of these but it has many positive reviews on Amazon. There is also a freezer test performed on this pen with the following results: Source: OfficeSupplyGeek


12

I write software for a company that supplies an application for field engineers to use to collect field data with a hardened android tablet. I expect you could use a text editor in a hardened android tablet to take notes. The value of this is that the notes can then be exported to a desktop (our software transmits it to a cloud server) and you won't have to ...


11

Well... a 4 season tent is a 4 season tent... You can use it during the whole year without any problems while a 2 season tent might not be as pleasant during the winter. I receive questions like this all the time. "What sort of boot should I get?", Packs, tents... My answer is kind of consistent for most of them... You buy gear for what you are going to use ...


11

I think the answer is highly personal, as an avid coffee-drinker, hot is for me what scalding might be for someone else. But if I am to give some kind of benchmark, I would say 45°C is a pretty good temperature to aim for. Not as hot as to scald your mouth, but hot enough to give you some warmth if drank in sufficient quantities. But if you want to carry "...


10

Depending on the complexity of the notes, you may not have to sightwrite them. So, wear a warm but roomy coat, pull in your arms, and take your paper and pencil notes that way.


9

The key to cold weather clothing is viewing it as a system. The base layer of the system wicks moisture from the body and provides a small amount of insulation. The middle layer(s) of the system provide warmth and wind protection. The outer layer provides protection from the elements. That being said, a proven system for the temperature range you're ...


9

TLDR: -148 °F including windchill has been survived inside of a snowcave. I went looking for cases of people surviving extremely low temperatures while inside a snow caves, and it looks like the record is held by the climbers who did the first winter ascent on Denali. On February 28, 1967, Dave Johnston, Art Davidson, and Ray Genet became the first climbers ...


9

I would suggest a pair of good waterproof winter gloves instead of mittens. These will keep your hands warm and protected from wind and still allow for enough dexterity for writing with a pencil.


8

Wind chill factors verge on being junk science, especially when interpreted uncritically. However, your physical intuition does make sense, and published formulas and tables do have a property very much like the one you have in mind: as the wind speed increases, the incremental effect of adding a given amount to the wind speed gets smaller and smaller. For ...


8

Let me suggest that some acclimatization may help (though I'm not sure how practical this is). I was personally rather astonished how much we can actually adapt to cold weather: I spent a winter in Winnipeg (office job, no outdoors job). Nevertheless, whereas I had been freezing on the bike in windproof + light fleece pants/jacket in November in +5°C rain, ...


7

A good estimation is to deduct 5 degrees Celsius from surface temperature to get temperature at 20m - 30m depth. (This is based on my experience over thousands of dives, but most of the diving is in temperate and colder waters) There are several factors that can influence the difference between the temperature at surface and at depth. I would say contact ...


7

The answer might be already hidden in the answer to this question: In the US, there seems to be no standardized norm for sleeping bags, i.e. every manufacturer can write onto the label whatever they want – which can be more or less realistic... Basically this means that they will possibly write the most impressive number onto the label they think they can ...


7

Your question made me wonder how Robert Falcon Scott wrote his final diary entries on his trip to the South Pole in 1912. This article, from The Guardian, Scott of the Antartic's final diary published online says with certainty that Scott's diary entries on the journey to the South Pole were written in pencil. Readers can, from today, pore over the ...


6

Many 4-season tents cannot be ventilated as well as tents made for summer conditions. Also, they tend to be larger. this means, you can use them, but it won´t be ideal. This differs a lot with the actual models you are comparing, some might be well suited for all conditions. Note that the temperature difference between summer and winter trips normally has ...


6

There's not a simple answer to the question of where your body loses heat, because the body is a sophisticated thermoregulator, and the amount of heat your body loses, and where it loses heat, varies depending on how warm or cold it "thinks" it is. The primary means of thermoregulation are by controlling blood flow near the surface of the skin, and by ...


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