10

The limit isn't temperature, it's heat index. Since your body cools itself by sweating, you need to take the humidity into account when figuring out if you're going to overheat. As an example, 10% humidity and 41°C (what you might find at Arches National Park) will heat you about the same as 100% humidity and 28°C (which you might find in the Everglades), ...


9

Its hard to confirm what the video crew was experiencing but generally speaking wet-bulb temperatures over 35C (approximate lethal limit for humans) are still very rare on this planet. An interesting study from 2020 dives deep into this subject: The study identifies thousands of previously rare or unprecedented bouts of extreme heat and humidity in Asia, ...


7

I am going to disagree with the frequency and surety with which you predict these temperature swings, but they do happen. Typically it gets colder as the night goes on, which is a shame because it's easy to kick off extra covering while only partly awake, but harder to add more. Nonetheless, here is what I do: I leave my sleeping bag unzipped, and when I go ...


3

The best option is a flued fuel-based heating system, such as a wood fire (depending on fuel availability). All the other options require you to either have open burning of fuel in the shed, which is a no-no for reasons of flame and CO production, or to use electricity, which as you mentioned is a precious resource. With a flue, gas (propane or methane) and ...


2

@BenCrowell's comment is right. This was going to be a comment agreeing with his, but grew. I think the best single number you could do is some sort of total sun risk index, which is of limited value as mitigations for the different risks are different (shade is good for both, clothing can increase heat retention while protecting from UV, extra water is ...


2

I think that the most extreme temperature swing I experienced in a tent involved 15 degrees C. Besides the zipping/unzipping what I've found to be helpful were: getting my head warm: not only covering-with-sleeping bag warm, but actually putting on a cap getting my face covered as much as I can: from my experience that is a surface which can lose a lot of ...


2

Even at home, I will add/subtract covers during the night. Mind you, I sleep with the window wide open. I go to bed knowing that the temp is going to go down. I usually sleep in polypro longjohns -- top and bottom. These give me draft resistance. This won't be true if my tarp is at 20 degrees C. I have a toque or balaclava at hand. I start the night ...


2

In four decades of backpacking, I don't think I have ever had a totally uninterrupted night or a totally comfortable night. I found the rewards of being in the outdoors so great that I just ignored minor inconveniences and discomforts. But that doesn't answer your question. And minor is subjective. The short answer is: ZIPPER. First, the scenario you ...


2

Here in Scotland it never really gets cold; getting below -10C is pretty rare, and in the summer here, because the sun doesn't set until very late (after 10pm in mid-summer) trying to get rid of excess heat is my first concern. I find in a small solo tent I generate far too much heat so an unzipped sleeping bag over me that I can kick off is essential. In a ...


1

It’s not just about the temperature, it’s also about the level of difficulty ( easy, moderate, strenuous, etc.), distance , elevation, humidity and how hydrated the hiker is. From personal experience a 1 mile hike with 99 Fahrenheit , around 10% humidity while staying hydrated is doable. Not comfortable but doable.


1

A tarp makes the best all season any weather shelter. Each occupant needs an overhead line or inside support in his corner to keep the tarp above his head. A centre or side chimney supporting the tent. 2 pegs on each corner attached to tie points 4” from tarp edge about 12” apart. Poles can support all sides which can be raised to make a shade in hot weather ...


1

It's possible to adapt yourself a bit, to get used to fluctuating temperatures, if you don't keep your home such a constant temperature. Partly this is temperature tolerance, but partly it's getting used to making adjustments while half asleep. dealing At home, I use the same quilt and (lack of) sleepwear year round, though the bedroom temperature can get ...


1

Via the NWS: The WetBulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) is a measure of the heat stress in direct sunlight, which takes into account: temperature, humidity, wind speed, sun angle and cloud cover (solar radiation). This differs from the heat index, which takes into consideration temperature and humidity and is calculated for shady areas. If you work or exercise in ...


1

For a period of time, asbestos was used. I have slept in an old army tent and the jacks were (I think but did not cut them to see) asbestos. There great, lightish durable, and totally safe until you rip it, breathe asbestos for awhile and die of lung cancer.


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