Hot answers tagged

51

Lots of swim/board shorts come with key keepers in the pockets. Chances are you may even have one in the swimwear you own. It's simply a length of elastic cord stitched into your pocket. If you don't have one, it can easily be added. You attach your keys to the loop using a girth hitch:


38

There are a few ways to do this in addition to the previous answer. If you have a car with a hitch: This is what we use when we SCUBA dive. Since you are only swimming and presumably not going to great depths, you can also use a waterproof wallet. I have two varieties: Or: The wallets tend to run less than $10, the hitch lock is more like $30-$50.


30

One of the deciding factors for thieves with cars is whether they can see something they consider of value. If they have it fixed in their minds to breaking into your vehicle, they will do it. Here is a few things I do to avoid such misfortunes: Park your vehicle in the best open and visual spot possible so that thieves would be deterred from being ...


28

If it's just the keys that need securing, I love key wristbands. They are properly secure and you have the key in sight if you are a bit paranoid about it ;) I prefer it over any kinds of bags on strings, as it gives you less of a hassle and less of a feeling you might lose that stuff dangling from your wrist at any moment. If you hit your favourite online ...


27

We've has a similar question on Travel.SE. The answer below is largely based on this other answer of mine. Invest in a Dry Egg/Box My suggestion is to carry your keys in the water with you when you go for a dip. Keys can easily fit in what is called a freediving dry egg/box which, as the name suggests, is a gadget used by divers to keep their stuff dry ...


23

I would be very leary about taking keys out into the water - most car modern car keys are not particular water proof and if you lose it in the water, it's pretty much gone for good. I use a combination lock box that attaches to my car. Eg something similar to this This allows you to leave bigger items in the car and rely on the car locks to keep every ...


23

The existing answers by Ken and Liam offer good advice. But unfortunately there is nothing you can do to prevent break ins. Thieves can be surprisingly stupid. True story... A friend of mine drove her jeep wrangler with a soft top to the trail head and parked it before going on a hike. The roof is canvas and the back side window unzips FROM THE OUTSIDE. ...


16

As a nudist/naturist, I've been to resorts where I've rented a cabin or trailer and needed to keep the key with me. As the resort(s) deal with people who aren't wearing trunks or have pockets, the key they provided was attached to a coil wristband, much like a telephone receiver cord. I was then able to keep it around my wrist the whole day while swimming, ...


15

Storing the backpack inside instead of next to you won't provide a whole lot more security, in some crowded places where theft is more common it might be justified. Normally, if I am worried about people my common practice is to keep a low profile and try to camp out of sight. If on the other hand, I know that there aren't any humans for several miles then ...


14

Very low budget solution: Safety pin your key to your swimsuit--inside a pocket if possible.


12

We hardly ever stay in a campground. We usually camp far from a trailhead, and far from the trail, in places where there are no official campsites. We have done this for decades, and nothing has ever been stolen by two-legged critters. When we are leaving our remote camps to take a hike, we put the packs inside the tent and zip up the tent. We always ...


11

Basically, the same rules as elsewhere apply. I’d stick with those: If possible, do not leave anything of value in the car. They can’t take what’s not there. Also avoid leaving hints of something valuable being in the car. For example, a few years back in Milan, the general advice was not to leave a suction cup holder for a sat-nav on the windshield, as ...


11

For many cameras, there are locks or lock boxes available. Google for "lock trail camera", and you will find plenty of offers. Other measures: fix the camera in a tree high enough you need a ladder to reach it, so people cannot just "accidentally" take the cam. They would have to bring a ladder as well, I guess most thieves won't invest that effort. use a ...


10

You can get waterproof belt pouches. I used to use them when I wore a wetsuit for kayaking (a drysuit makes this simpler). They'll easily hold cash + phone +keys, and are nicer for swimming with than something that trails round your neck. As kayaking sometimes involves swimming in white water with trees and rocks around, the pouches with lanyards would be ...


9

If you can't leave the car empty-looking, at least don't load the storage up at the trailhead. There was a spate of thefts a few years ago on Dartmoor where car parks were watched for signs of valuables being tucked away, then a window was smashed and the items stolen. This was the sort of place where cars are parked for hours rather than days. In our ...


9

One thing that has not been mentioned is to consider which trail head you park at. Some trails/areas have multiple trail heads. If you have a choice in trail head, it is worth talking to locals to determine if any are particularly problematic. In my experience the most problematic trail heads are those with easy access. What this means is that often if the ...


9

The quick answer to a question of credible sources for solo trekking trails is, "NO", there are no sources which can be completely relied on for this kind of information (at least for the western ghats part). The following set of attributes might help you in deciding upon heading out solo in the western ghats: Safety: The western ghats are safe for ...


9

There is a product that launched in 2015 called PocketBands. It is a low profile silicone band/bracelet that has a hidden pocket. You insert your key on the underside and it stays secure while swimming, running or other activities. It only holds one key, so you would need to buy two for both your keys. I bought these when PocketBands were a Kickstarter ...


9

A thin (2 or 3mm) steel wire, plastic coated, with a loop at each end works well. Anything between one and two metres will do, depending on tent situation. One end looped round the straps of the bag - or locked with a small padlock to the zip ends, and the other end wherever you prefer. That could be attached to the tent, a tentpole, your sleeping bag zipper,...


9

I assume based on the [backpacking] tag and the phrases "miles away from civilization" and "most contents of a pack are essential" that you are specifically talking about back country camping and not car camping. The reason I am clarifying is my opinions on security are very different for the two and many of the answers presented here are only practical for ...


8

If your trunks don't have a designated key pouch or you're a female you can tie your keys to the draw string inside your trunks or bikini top. If you have a key fob on your keychain leave it in your car or at home. If your car has a combination lock you can leave your keys in the car.


8

I use 3mm utility cord around my neck. I tie in key with a Girth Hitch. Or tie the key into the necklace. I use a double fisherman on the cord.


7

Here are a couple of tips. Make it harder for them to steal anything, roll up your vehicle's windows and lock its doors. Make your stuff less attractive to thieves, cover valuables with a blanket and don't flash expensive gear or jewelry. Exude confidence, look people in the eye, walk with a confident stride, and make it clear that you are not someone to be ...


6

There ain't no way man...As Mr. Miyagi would say, "the best defense against a would be car vandal is no be there." I propose a different solution than others would: I never have that problem because I do not park at trailheads. We have been known to pull our 1999 Toyota Corolla off the dirt road we were on ( another tip: find those dirt roads! ) and cover ...


6

I can't help you with exact configurations. But as usual this kind of thing has a basic rule. The less it's activated, the less it will use it's battery. Standby mode (time it spends counting the seconds to next use) will use almost no power at all. As soon as it comes to life it will aquire a GPS signal, Triangulate it's position and send it to a server ...


6

It frustrates me that most of the answers are unfortunate variations of "just put the keys into your pocket" The problem with that suggestion is that most sets of car keys include an electronic component with buttons for remotely interacting with the car. The only other really viable answer I've seen is the Dry Egg thing, but that isn't entirely convenient....


5

In general trekking/hiking is not very common in RSA and most of the possibilities will be maintained by the MCSA. I recommend that you get in contact with the Cape Town section of the MCSA and ask about longer hiking trips. Generally you have to consider that most land in RSA is private property and owners may not allow trespassing. But if the MCSA tells ...


5

I’m having trouble finding a link, but I’ve read several praises for a net bag made out of cable. Put the bag in it and lock it closed. When ready to hit the trail again, it collapses into a little ball and goes into the pack. The hard part for OP’s situation is finding something to secure it to. The testimonials I read were from people staying in ...


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