52

To remedy the lack of sources (and hard numbers), I've started to write down here (for easier references) what is given for caloric values here: USDA Food Composition Databases. Feel free to contribute. ALL CALORIC VALUES LISTED BELOW ARE IN KCALS FOR 100 GRAMS OF THE PRODUCT. Pâté Fish in tin cans (+) practically never spoils (+) can be warmed on the ...


30

I don't think it works like you think it works. If you're trying to build your distance, you might do 8 miles one Saturday, then the next weekend do 8 on Saturday and 6 on Sunday. The next, 10 on Saturday and 8 on Sunday. Or more if you feel up to it. Mixing training and a through hike is a recipe for bad things to happen, from fatigue to blisters to actual ...


23

There are a lot of factors, but for the Appalachian Trail there are a lot of hikers so it can give us pretty good insight into the time it takes for the average thru hiker to reach maximum mileage per day. Map Man (Steve Shuman) conducted an analysis of 240 successful north bound Appalachian Trial thru hikers who kept a journal (so not quite average, but I ...


14

Couscous is one of the best sources of carbohydrate I've found. It's much denser than most forms of pasta so takes up less space, and can be cooked using much less fuel. Mixed with a packet of dried soup or even just chilli powder it's reasonably palatable, or you can chuck in anything else you can find (meat, veg, etc).


14

I haven't tried it, but it looks ridiculous. If you are going to be hiking on flat and mildly rough terrain, why not get a bike with a lot of panniers. This provides for the same carrying capacity (maybe up to 40 kg). Probably will be less expensive than the trailer. There is an obvious advantage when going flat or downhill. Bikes have larger wheels than ...


13

Months not days. Walking is a sport. Like any sport, you need to train your sport-specific muscles over months before you start getting really serious. If not, instead of getting progressively stronger, you'll just injure yourself on the first day and you won't recover. Unlike most other sports though, if you injure yourself hiking then you're most likely ...


12

Its going to depend on the person and the terrain, from experience it takes about 5 days to week to really hit your stride, but that will depend per person and some people take much longer to really get going. The other thing you are missing here is that you will be able to go faster and further during the hike, because like a rocket, you are consuming your ...


11

I made my own hiking trailer - first version 2011. I pulled my hiking trailer in various environments. You can read more in my Wiki pages - the text is Finnish but you can use Google translator. In my Wikipages you can find answers to many guestions and problems. It really works very well in all terrain.


10

I think you need to separate this into two parts: Money spent before the trail starts, and budgeting while on the trail. Before you start, you're going to spend money on gear for sure. Your sleeping bag that was good enough for a weekend trip is now your home... Do you really want to put up with that limp, cold bag for 5-6 months? Same goes with a lot of ...


10

Compare the size of those wheels with the size of the wheels of outdoor vehicles, and you'll see that such small wheels can't work well in hard terrain! Probably even on dry meadow the energy you'll have to use to drag that device, which will constantly catch on blades of grass and other plants, would be much more than that you'll use to carry a backpack. ...


10

It will depend so much on the individual. I think your numbers are aggressive. You should do some training and start at more the 10-12. And finish at like 14-16. Your legs, heart, shoulders, and lungs all get stronger. But they also get tired. I have done a number of 50 milers and did not see much improvement in a week. Last day could hump out ...


9

See the llamas looking at them weirdly at 2:10? That's because the llamas know how ridiculous it is! I'm not just referring to how it looks, I'm referring to the fact that in anything other than nice terrain it just doesn't look like it'll work. Fancy pulling that through a marsh? Even assuming the ground is solid (big assumption in the wilderness) the ...


9

For pure calorific content, you cant beat Kendall Mint Cake. Its basically glucose, sugar and some mint essence, stores very well, is light, cheap and you can even make some yourself easily enough. There's a reason Edmund Hillary took it to Everest :-) Id also take lots of beef jerky, which is great protein for the weight. Various flavours and substitutes ...


9

According to the 2016 Halfway Anywhere Survey of PCT hikers: The average days on trail was 145 and the length is 2,650 miles (4265 km). The average number of resupply stops was 26 If you subtract the average of 17 zero days (days without mileage) and 13 near-zeros, we have 115 days of actual walking, meaning the average hiker was carrying 4-5 days of ...


8

Here are some pointers and questions: Gloves: Layers are good. Have spares, as well as a set of mittens. Wool pants: How water resistant are they? The greatest potential for problems would be from precipitation in temperature ranges from 32F down to +10F. You don't want frozen stuff melting into your trousers when cold. Sorels: Is that -40F for active or ...


8

I met a fellow from Holland using a Wheelie to hike across Canada. This was his third or fourth summer hiking across Canada and he recommended the Wheelie for anything close to what he was doing. He walked mostly without using his hands, but he loved the handles for when the road was rough. He was using roads exclusively. He had purchased the optional ...


8

For sustaining a person long term in extreme conditions such as walking daily 15-25 miles in varying conditions, the biggest problem after having enough energy to walk is the ability to properly recover every night to do that again and again. To be able to recover well you need a good amount of protein every day, especially during the night, to get good ...


7

Depends on where you are going? Some places/nations will not allow certain food types. However to answer your question: Military Rations pricey but well known to be very shelf stable. However they are bulky and if you are hiking by yourself with no re-supply I assume space and weight are at a premium Survival Energy Bars - They are usually pretty compact, ...


7

I find tahini paste to be a useful trip food. According to wikipedia: Tahini is an excellent source of copper, manganese and the amino acid methionine. Tahini is a source of the healthy fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6. Tahini made from raw sesame seeds is lower in fat than tahini made from roasted seeds. Tahini's relatively high levels of calcium and ...


7

I met a guy who left February 14th, the same day as I did, and he used a 40F Katabatic quilt the whole time. He slept with his down coat and gloves on. I didn't meet many people with 0F bags. I took a 0F Feathered Friends bag and was never uncomfortable. I swapped it out for a 35F bag in early May and had a few cold nights in Northern Virginia. Leaving ...


7

NSTs do not have a uniform set of rules. That said for the major trails, there are good websites that can answer many of your questions. The ATC website says that dogs are NOT allowed in 3 areas: Baxter State Park in Maine, Great Smoky mountains National Park in Tennessee, and Bear Mountain State Park in New York. There is an alternate road walk for the ...


7

In the more densely populated areas of Central Europe these long distance trails just seamlessly blend in with regional or local trails, so while the whole, say, 2690 km of the EB Eisenach - Budapest may not be well-known, e.g. its westernmost 170 km is the Rennsteig, a very famous regional trail in Germany which is moreover very old: it used to be a ...


6

For an extended trip, one of your problems will be the accumulation of moisture in your insulation. I would definitely get some kind of vapor barrier layer for your sleeping bag and at least try some vapor barrier socks. It is very important that you test your gear for a couple nights before you head out. Better to make your mistakes in the back yard than ...


6

No. They can be on the vast majority of each trail, but in most cases the land agencies along the way still have their own rules, and many National Parks (and some state parks) forbid pets on trails. You would have to either bypass those areas or arrange for your pet to be transported to the other end of each.


6

There are several equivalents just as there is for the AT. I would consider Halfmile maps combined with PocketPCT. Halfmile's PCT maps 'Erik the Black' books PCT Data Book Pocket PCT (No longer available at this link as of March 2018) U.S. Forest Service PCT Yogi's (No longer available as of March of 2018) Wilderness Press books / databook ('official') ...


6

Potato Chips: seriously good cal/weight ratio, come in a variety of flavors. Most will crumble quite easily but not too bad. Nido: this is dried whole milk, often found in the Mexican/international aisle of US grocery stores. It actually tastes very good, I often have some in the evening or morning for an extra boost. You can pair this with some "instant ...


6

People have taken dogs on long thru hikes in about that time. This summer my dog was (I’m fairly certain) the first to complete a thru-hike of the Continental Divide Trail. We began our adventure June 20th at Chief Mountain in Glacier National Park on the Canada/Montana border. We hiked through 5 states: Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. ......


5

Porridge is good for breakfast. The small packets of "golden syrup flavour" are the best, but a bit more expensive than regular porridge. (N.B. The more powdery it is the faster it cooks.) Carbs: rice/pasta/ cous cous (I like "Moroccan medley", "tomato & chilli"). [aluminium bubble foil: DIY shops sell this in the insulation dept. Use this to make a ...


5

Not tested yet. Criteria lightweight, long shelf life, low bulk, no cook, easy and cheap resupply. Oat meal [compressible]-amino acid: methionine, tryptophan. Powered milk [compressible]- amino acid: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, valine; electrolyte: sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium. Almond- (due to gout, ...


5

The only real difference is that in a one piece double you don't have zips so the insulation is evenly distributed. The zips add some weight over a one piece but not much - it also won't pack quite as small but has the advantage that it can be split across two packs. Where you have zips, the insulation has gaps. So if you are going somewhere really cold, ...


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