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10

In general, the time from high to low tide or vice versa is a little over 6 hours. This varies by location, of course, but it will get you in the ballpark. 12 hours and 15 minutes from high tide to high tide is little more accurate, because some places the low tide is early or late relative to the high tide. If you plan ahead, you can look up the amount the ...


10

The math is absurdly complicated. There is no way you are going to be able to estimate the tides without substantial geographical and astronomical information. The brackish areas can be especially hard to predict, because their geometry can cause them to have more complicated cycles than the common twice daily cycle. From the Wiki Article on Tides: The ...


9

It looks a lot like there's a power station just downstream (photo), which can be seen on openstreetmap. I suspect that the power plant is being used to respond to peak loads for which hydro is very good. That whole stretch of river has several power stations and the flow through them will be coordinated to some extent. In particular there's a dam upstream ...


7

You'd be much better off doing the research before you head into the areas - print off tide tables for where you are heading to and for the period you'll be there. Tide tables should be available on your local meteorological service's website - and should include things like average range of the tide. The actual range between low and high tide is dependent ...


5

There is a (very) basic model that involves taking into account the position of the moon - the earth rotates on its axis once every 24 hours and the moon rotates the earth in the same direction once every 28 days. The moon pulls on the sea creating a sort of bulge on the side of earth currently facing it, hence high tide - an equal bulge appears the other ...


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